Cur Deus Homo and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Cur Deus Homo (Classic Reprint) Paperback – August 20, 2012


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback, August 20, 2012
$42.50 $3.99

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 278 pages
  • Publisher: Forgotten Books (August 20, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1440058555
  • ISBN-13: 978-1440058554
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,465,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By James Huffman on February 20, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The scandal of Christianity is that God -- the Almighty God who created all that is seen and unseen -- became a man. Specifically, He became a male Palestinian who lived from around 4 B.C. to around 29-30 A.D. A man who was born of a woman, who was hungry, thirsty, sleepy, tired -- everything that we do -- but without sin.

And that man who at the same time God suffered for us under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died and was buried and rose from the dead on the third day.

All of this is affirmed by orthodox Christians. The question that has been asked -- and which this book seeks to answer -- is not, "Did this all happen?," but "Why did God become man?" St. Anselm's discussion is the classic discussion of western theories of the Atonement.

A little baffling is the paucity of scripture in this book, but St. Anselm is trying to answer the question by use of reason, in the form of a dialog.

This particular translation was completed in 1903 and this is a reprint of that translation which has been out of print for some time. It's a good re-print, easy to read (the book is surprisingly short for as influential as it has been) and well-bound. The publisher has done good for all Christians by providing this printing of this book. While not simple reading, this book is not difficult for educated Christians -- lay or clergy -- to read and ponder.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Joseph L. Louthan VINE VOICE on May 16, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Anselm's Cur Deus Homo or Why Did God Become Man? is an excellent, deep theological work that attempts to unravel the mystery behind the Incarnation of God in Christ Jesus our Lord and Savior. I gave this book only four out of five stars only because half of the book was letters back and forth between Anselm and people in the church and the monastery and it felt like filler to me. Despite the filler, the first 100 pages are well worth the price of the book and I recommend it to anyone who is not only interested in the "God became flesh and dwelt among us" but exploring the deep theological and philosophical aspects on the supposed free will of man versus the true and absolute free will of God.

The format is quite unique in that this is the first theological book I have read that is a discussion between two men. In this, we have Boso, a compatriot of the author's, who serves as the one inquiring about the Incarnation from a layperson's view and the unregenerate's view. And then we have Anselm, who seems to provide the answers but even more so, sharpens iron with Boso and sharpens iron with the reader.

I was pleased and fortunately to read this book after finishing Athanasius' On the Incarnation of the Word (which was a double joy to read around Christmas) and I felt like Athanasius' work serves as great, worshipful setup to this book. Athanasius lobs the pitch up and Anselm swings for the fences. If I could give the highest recommendation, it would to read On The Incarnation followed by Cur Deus Homo.

After reading, praying, processing and meditating, I would summed up the entire book in this:

In man's sinful nature, man lacks the power, ability and free will to fully live for God. However, in His divine nature, God has the power, ability and the free will to die for man so that man might fully live for God.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Bert C. Mccollum on October 18, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I can only add my approval to the compliments already given in the first two reviews. This is one of the great classics on the Christian west, and should be read by all Christians who are interested in attaining a greater knowledge and understanding of their faith. This translation is clear and elegant. There is an active table of contents. The price for such a treasure is a mere pittance. Please don't pass this one up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 30, 2013
Format: Paperback
In his most famous of all books, Why God Became Man, Anselm is answering the question given certain presuppositions. These include the great offence against God by mankind’s sin. Here it is significant to remember that the magnitude of the offence is not measured by the nature of the sin but by the nature of the One sinned against. Thus Anselm argues that the debt mankind owes to God for failing to give Him his due, is something that only God Himself can rectify.

God is only satisfied, hence Anselm’s theory of the Atonement, by One who is more than the sum of humanity (which could never suffice to restore God’s honor), and the One who is so “chosen” to restore the honor must by necessity command humanity’s allegiance: “The One who frees humanity from their predicament demands their obedience.” And secondly, “in order for an individual to offer an acceptable satisfaction he must be ‘all that God is not.’ ”

In Jesus Christ, the God-Man, the harmony is restored to the universe that was disrupted by Sin. Our faith and devotion in obedience to the One who sets us free is till being offered to God alone, as it is God who frees us.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A customer on December 8, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I still haven't read into the book that far, but the typesetting in this edition is decent and the content speaks for itself. Buy this book if you want to understand Western Christian thinking on the Atonement.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?