Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $4.99 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Custer's Last Campaign: M... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Clean and solid. A couple of creases across corners.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Custer's Last Campaign: Mitch Boyer and the Little Bighorn Reconstructed Paperback – August 1, 1993


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$22.96
$18.20 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$19.99

Frequently Bought Together

Custer's Last Campaign: Mitch Boyer and the Little Bighorn Reconstructed + Lakota Noon: The Indian Narrative of Custer's Defeat + The Mystery of E Troop: Custer's Gray Horse Company at the Little Bighorn
Price for all three: $55.28

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 446 pages
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (August 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803270402
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803270404
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 5.5 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #613,890 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Gray, a retired physician and Little Big Horn aficionado, has produced a book intended to be the final word on the events surrounding Custer's final campaign. He does a good job of highlighting the role of Indian scout Boyer, but most of the book slides toward tedium. The last half is an incredible minute-by-half-minute reconstruction of the movements of virtually every person and horse involved in the battle. Reappraisals such as this are of interest mostly to antiquarians who quibble about who-shot-who-from-which-hill. For Western Americana collections; public libraries will still be better off with Evan Connell's lush Son of the Morning Star ( LJ 9/1/84).
- Raymond L. Puffer, U.S. Air Force History Prog., Los Angeles
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Easily the most significant book yet published on the Battle of the Little Bighorn."—Paul L. Hedren, Western Historical Quarterly
(Paul L. Hedren Western Historical Quarterly)

"[Gray] has applied rigorous analysis as no previous historian has done to these oft-analyzed events. His detailed time-motion study of the movements of the various participants frankly boggles the mind of this reviewer. No one will be able to write of this battle again without reckoning with Gray"—Thomas W. Dunlay, Journal of American History
(Thomas W. Dunlay Journal of American History)

"Gray challenges many time-honored beliefs about the battle. Perhaps most significantly, he brings in as much as possible the testimony of the Indian witnesses, especially that of the young scout Curley, which generations of historians have dismissed for contradictions that Gray convincingly demonstrates were caused not by Curley but by the assumptions made by his questioners . . . The contrasts in [this] book. . . restate the basic components of what still attracts the imagination to the Little Bighorn."—Los Angeles Times Book Review
(Los Angeles Times Book Review)

"Gray's analysis, by and large, is impressively drawn; it is an immensely logical reconstruction that should stand the test of time. As a contribution to Custer and Indian wars literature, it is indeed masterful."—Jerome A. Greene, New Mexico Historical Review
(Jerome A. Greene New Mexico Historical Review)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 16 customer reviews
An important study, highly recommended.
Bomojaz
Most historians would be happy, nay overjoyed, if they located a diary, a journal or a set of letters by a participant in some historical event.
Rory Coker
Great detail on Custer's final battle and possible plan.
Daniel Hurley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Bob Reece on July 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
For over 25 years, of his life, John Gray lived and breathed Mitch Boyer. Gray was driven to understand the scout who fell with Custer at the Little Bighorn. Gray spent that long writing the biography of Boyer and was almost on his last chapter when a monumental discovery was announced.
One evening I was lucky to sit next to John Gray in an auditorium on the Colorado State University campus in Ft. Collins, Colorado. Gray lived in this town not far north of me. He and I met in 1981 and we were catching up on things. We were waiting for a presentation by Douglas Scott, archaeologist for the National Park Service, about the 1984 archaeological dig at Custer Battlefield. Scott presented an incredible story of artifacts found on the battlefield, human remains and what this data might mean to the story of Custer's Last Stand.
Found near markers 33 and 34, along the Deep Ravine Trail, about 350 yards from Last Stand Hill were human remains including part of a jawbone, nasal cavity and eye orbit. Among the remains were found a mother-of-pearl button, soldier cartridges and warrior bullets. After extensive study of the remains, the forensic anthropologist determined that this person was of Caucasian-Mongoloid mix. The mother-of-pearl button suggested he was wearing civilian clothing. He was probably part of the Custer Battalion because of the solider cartridges and Indian bullets fired towards him. Only one person fit this picture, Mitch Boyer. Scott felt confident this was the case. After this announcement I turned to Gray and asked him how he felt now knowing Mitch Boyer was identified. Gray sat in awe and he said that now he could write the final chapter.
I recommend this book for many reasons.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Gettleman on February 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
I absolutely agree with the other reviewers on the quality of Gray's work--it is astounding. I would like to emphasize what I took away from the book: a new picture of G.A. Custer. For a hundred years it has been the "customary wisdom" that Custer, being a flamboyant, egocentric, arrogant commander, rushed into battle at the LBH because he wanted the glory of defeating the Sioux all to himself, and met his doom because his hubris blinded him to the Indians' superior forces. Part of this "customary wisdom" came with an implied view that this hubris was due to a belief in racial superiority of the white soldier vs. the Indian. As is so often the case, the "customary wisdom" is superficial, and when held up to rigorous analysis, proves wrong. Gray's trenchant logic make it clear that Custer was attempting to follow his orders from Terry, found himself in a battle situation that was not favorable, but due to the perception that the 7th Cavalry had been discovered, had no alternative but to attack. His battle plan was improvised at the moment, and was thwarted not because of Custer's hubris, or his false belief that his soldiers were fighting "only Indians", but for the reason many battles are lost: the failure of one of his unit commanders (Benteen) to follow orders and coordinate his actions with the actions of the remainder of Custer's command. I expect, however, that the old, comfortable, politically correct view of Custer will die hard, if at all--to some, logic means naught.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By rodboomboom HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on April 19, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The reader becomes mesmerized and impressed by the thorough and meticulous process of constantly checking witness testimony with known topography and horse/walking/etc. mph rates, then time/motion studies with all possible data examined to see what plausible explanations can be more pushed forward as likely scenarios.
At the center here is the infamous Indian scout, Mitch Boyer and the testimony of the young Curly, survivor with Custer.
Amazing how the evidence Gray presents turns Custer 180o around from what is historically bantered, an aggressive disobiendent hawkish leader. Gray's reconstruction reveals soldier who emphasized and implemented what orders were given to him, to pin the Indians from left flank escape, and all the time awaiting Benteen's company and ammo train, which never arrived in time.
Disappointed that no chronology chain here shown how the followup takes place to discover the battlefield. Possibly Gray's other books on this subject cover that.
Remarkably well written, able to keep this reader's attention easily even with all the careful calculation checks, etc.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Rory Coker on August 22, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Most historians would be happy, nay overjoyed, if they located a diary, a journal or a set of letters by a participant in some historical event. In tracing some relatively unimportant activities, Gray is not satisfied unless he can find three or four itineraries, four or five journals and diaries, and two or three sets of letters! Another reviewer commented that the writing of this book took 25 years! I can well believe it. With the well-known fallibility of eyewitnesses, this overwhelming mass of documentation is barely enough to allow Gray to sift event from confabulation.
What we have here are two books in one. The first book, in 180 pages, traces the life and career of guide and translator Mitch Boyer. At first one might dismiss such a goal as impossible, but Gray is equal to the task, and Boyer emerges as a convincing, consistent and competent historical personage.
The second book, in about 200 pages, uses what Gray calls "time-motion studies" to trace the troop movements from June 9, 1876 to and through the culminating Battle of the Little Bighorn. His "time-motion patterns" are what physicists call "world lines," with one space dimension as the vertical axis, and time as the horizontal axis. Where these diagrams indicate the interactions between a dozen separated groups they virtually amount to the classical equivalent of Feynman diagrams--- tools used by theoretical physicists to disentangle the various processes occurring in the realm where relativistic quantum physics hold sway.
The Mitch Boyer connection between the first and second parts of the book occurs because Boyer was the only scout who chose to stay with and die with Custer's columns.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews