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Customer-Driven IT: How Users Are Shaping Technology Industry Growth Hardcover – February 18, 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press (February 18, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578518652
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578518654
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.5 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,301,035 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Predicting the future of information technology isn't easy-even the mighty Bill Gates long underestimated the influence of the Web-but Moschella is confident enough to do some prognosticating in this innovative book. The Computerworld columnist suggests a major power shift is underway, away from suppliers and toward customers. Through a kind of democratization of IT uses-for popular sites like Amazon.com, eBay and E*TRADE, among others-what customers need and demand will be what drives the future of the industry. Moschella runs readers through a history of the field and looks particularly at past introductions of technologies like radio and TV to see what lessons readers can learn about how the Web is being accepted economy-wide. This is more a book for hardcore industry wonks than it is for average lay readers, but it neatly distills the major technological advances of this century and peers into the future, to tell readers what other changes are in store for the world of IT.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Inside Flap

A Visionary Look at the Future of Information Technology

Will e-commerce ever really take off? What will it take to make online advertising work? Will we ever be able to vote online? Questions about the Internet’s true potential have been echoing across the IT landscape since the dot-com bubble burst. Will the Internet’s full promise ever be realized?

Noted industry forecaster David Moschella says it will— because the main source of IT innovation and progress has fundamentally changed. In this visionary book, Moschella predicts that it will be the effectiveness of IT customer leadership that will determine the future prospects for the information technology industry.

Customer-Driven IT describes the shift from a supplier- to a customer-led IT industry. It explains why even the most powerful IT vendors simply can’t address most of the key opportunities and challenges the industry now faces—but how IT customers and their industries increasingly can.

Moschella explores the concept of a customer-driven IT industry value chain, in which the value that IT customers create for each other is the most important source of IT market demand. By applying this model to a wide range of business, educational, government, and consumer IT applications, Moschella shows why IT customers must take the lead in developing many of the new systems, platforms, and standards the IT industry needs to move ahead.

This change in industry leadership has many implications for customers and suppliers alike. The book describes the adjustments each group will have to make in terms of its strategies, tactics, and mind-sets in order to leverage new opportunities and realize future profits, particularly in emerging areas such as Web Services and Semantic Applications.

The fate of the IT industry now rests much more with those who use technology than with those who sell it. If customers successfully embrace this important new role, the growth of the Internet might ultimately surprise us all.


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Customer Reviews

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Even dummies can manage this.
P. Craig
This also means that traditional venture capital backed start-ups will play a diminishing role in the industry.
Matti Makelin
As a result, the book dives deeper on occasion than the casual reader may like.
Frank Gens, SVP, AMR Research

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Matti Makelin on May 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent book on the near term future of IT. It says that the next IT growth is based on customer innovation. No incremental improvements to existing or leadership in emerging markets are is likely to be sufficient to drive a major industry expansion (page xiv). The shift from supplier to customer dominated industry represents a huge cultural and business change and challenge.
The emerging customer-centric era requires customer leadership, including vision, motivation, skills, and decision making capabilities. Customers must show the same level of faith and commitment than IT suppliers have provided in the past. The customer motivation is the single most important risk of the future success of IT (page 230). This is closely tied to executive attitudes towards technology (234).
This also means that traditional venture capital backed start-ups will play a diminishing role in the industry.
The responsibility is on the leadership of existing industries, with a relative absence of start-ups and therefore a relatively reduced role of entrepreneurs (143).
"The sad thing is that so much of (this) energy flowed into a flawed industry vision ...unless the IT industry embraces some sort of shared long-term vision and direction, the use of technology could either drift aimlessly or continue to squeeze diminishing returns out of proven areas of investments" (40).
Many of the key customer-centric applications have already been identified. These include music, advertisement, payments, health care, e-learning, government services, and community interaction (26).
Web Services and Semantic Applications are marketed as the next big thing concepts. Web Services implement process nets with modular components.
Read more ›
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By K. Wu on March 11, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book does a good job to summarize the past and current IT industry trends. The author high-level summarizes what he saw in the past and what he forsees in the future. This is a book for you to read and then think about what it means to your business.
However, there are some chapters not easy for everyone to read. Recommend to read ch1 and ch2 - if you are interested in the past IT trend; ch3 - the main concept of the book and the last chapter - conclusion. If you don't understand web services, then you can read other chapters.
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By John A. Dix on January 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a 22 year IT veteran, I've never before seen anything like the paralysis that now grips the industry. Buyers are awash in technology and afraid to take another step forward for fear that it will simply add to their problems instead of help solve them. Suppliers are out of sorts because the old spaghetti rules don't work any more ... throw a bunch of tech at the wall and see what, if anything, sticks. And everyone is spinning around in circles looking for the answer.
The author might not have all of the answers, but he points the industry in a direction that it needs to go, which is a dang good starting point. His answer: recognize that customers are now an integral part of the IT value chain. His words: "... with the arrival of the Internet, for the first time in this business's history, IT customers were intentionally and systematically creating value for other IT customers."
[Amazon.com] and others, he argues, were driving other organizations to reach for new technology goals. The customer was driving the industry, not the suppliers, as has been the case traditionally. Interesting insight. And the author goes on to say what this means to the long term growth and viability of the industry.
A good read, particularly as we as an industry try to sort out the lessons of the recent past and plan where we go from here.
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By John A. Dix on January 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a 22 year IT veteran, I've never before seen anything like the paralysis that now grips the industry. Buyers are awash in technology and afraid to take another step forward for fear that it will simply add to their problems instead of help solve them. Suppliers are out of sorts because the old spaghetti rules don't work any more ... throw a bunch of tech at the wall and see what, if anything, sticks. And everyone is spinning around in circles looking for the answer.
The author might not have all of the answers, but he points the industry in a direction that it needs to go, which is a dang good starting point. His advice: recognize that customers are now an integral part of the IT value chain. His words: �� with the arrival of the Internet, for the first time in this business�s history, IT customers were intentionally and systematically creating value for other IT customers.�
Amazon and others, he argues, were driving other organizations to reach for new technology goals. The customer was driving the industry, not the suppliers, as has been the case traditionally. Interesting insight. And the author goes on to say what this means to the long term growth and viability of the industry.
A good read, particularly as we as an industry try to sort out the lessons of the recent past and plan where we go from here.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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