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Cut Paperback – February 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 660L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Push; Edition Unstated edition (February 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439324599
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439324595
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (441 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #788,563 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Burdened with the pressure of believing she is responsible for her brother's illness, 15-year-old Callie begins a course of self-destruction that leads to her being admitted to Sea Pines, a psychiatric hospital the "guests" refer to as Sick Minds. Although initially she refuses to speak, her individual and group therapy sessions trigger memories and insights. Slowly, she begins emerging from her miserable silence, ultimately understanding the role her dysfunctional family played in her brother's health crisis.

Patricia McCormick's first novel is authentic and deeply moving. Callie suffers from a less familiar teen problem--she cuts herself to relieve her inner frustrations and guilt. The hope and hard-won progress that comes at the conclusion of the novel is believable and heartening for any teen reader who feels alone in her (or his) angst. Along with Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak and E.L. Konigsburg's Silent to the Bone, McCormick's Cut expertly tackles an unusual response to harrowing adolescent trouble. (Ages 14 and older) --Emilie Coulter

From Publishers Weekly

This first novel combines pathos with insight as it describes adolescent girls being hospitalized for a variety of psychiatric disorders: "The place is called a residential treatment facility. It is not called a loony bin," states Callie, the narrator, with characteristic grit. Callie does not speak aloud for most of the story, but directs her silent commentary chiefly to her therapist. Through this internalized dialogue, readers become aware of Callie's practice of cutting herself and, more gradually, how her cutting is a response to the dynamics of her damaged family. Similarly, the other girls' problemsDanorexia, overeating, substance abuseDcome to seem (both to themselves and to readers) like attempts to fight off parental or societal obliviousness to their needs: "It's like we're invisible," says a girl during a climactic scene. While running the risk of simplifying the healing process, this novel, like Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak, sympathetically and authentically renders the difficulties of giving voice to a very real sense of harm and powerlessness. Refusing to sensationalize her subject matter, McCormick steers past the confines of the problem-novel genre with her persuasive view of the teenage experience. Ages 12-up. (Oct.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Patricia McCormick is a two-time National Book Award Finalist whose books include "Cut," "SOLD," "Never Fall Down," and the young readers edition of "I am Malala." SOLD, based on McCormick's research in the brothels of India, has been made into a feature film due out in fall 2014.

Her debut novel, "Cut" is a sensitive portrayal of one girl's struggle with self-injury; it has sold nearly a million copies. "SOLD," a searing novel written in vignettes, and "Never Fall Down," based on the true story of a boy who survived the Killing Fields of Cambodia, were National Book Award finalists. Her other books, "My Brother's Keeper", and "Purple Heart" have received numerous awards.

She worked recently with Malala Yousafzai, on the young readers' edition of "I am Malala," the story of the Pakistani girl who was shot by the Taliban for standing up for her right to an education.

For more information: http://www.pattymccormick.com/ and http://www.facebook.com/pages/Patricia-McCormick/150993641605301

Customer Reviews

It is filled with vivid and poignant emotions, and Patricia McCormick develops her main character well.
Allyn
An amazingly real novel that anyone can to relate to, that makes you think; this book brings us back to reality and shows us how to understand a cutter.
Anna-Kay Thomas
I have to say that even though I did like this book,the end didn't leave me with any real answers because to me it just didn't seem realistic.
Katherine

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

80 of 86 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 12, 2003
Format: Paperback
I had expected more from this book when i bought it. After reading the summary on the back cover, i was hoping to read a serious novel that truly confronted the issue of self-injury (SI). Instead, i found the book to be lacking in depth and using SI as a gimmick to establish the lead character, Callie, in the setting of the book.
"Cut" is not a novel about the issue of cutting. It is a novel about a girl in an adolescent psychiatric ward. As written, the book is a very diluted version of "Girl, Interrupted," describing Callie's stay in the ward and some experiences with her therapist and with the other patients. With very little effort, this book could be rewritten as a story of a girl with an eating disorder or a substance abuse problem--the type of mental-health issue is unimportant to the plot.
If you are looking for a story about life in a psychiatric ward, written at a middle school level, this book is perfect and very readable. If, however, you are looking for a book for older teens or adults, or for a book specifically confronting the issue of self-injury, you will likely find "Cut" very disapppointing.
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48 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Terrence Ibarra on February 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
Look, i don't want to be really mean or anything. I just feel I really have to write a little review of this after seeing all these good reviews. I cut myself for four years, from 14 to 18. I know what it's about, I know why people do it. I have talked to so many others that have gone through the same things. Almost the only thing i found affirming, empowering in this book was the thought, about half way through, that I, too, could be a published author. And one with a little authenticity as well. Maybe I'm the only one, but I just got the feeling, from start to finish, that the author had never watched blood seep up through her skin, never waited those moments between the cutting and the release. Additionally, there are at least three jokes in this book taken almost, if not, word for word from "Girl, Interrupted." This book, "Cut," was about as genuine as the episode of 7th Heaven that dealt with the same subject. If you are struggling with this, if you are looking for some understanding, a little illumination, or, if you are a friend of someone who cuts themselves, or even if you are just looking for a book on this subject, look somewhere, ANYWHERE else. You will find no help, you will be unable to GIVE any help based on anything in this book. I'm not sure who was involved in letting this thing out, but perhaps they should reevaluate their criteria, not to mention their careers. As for the author, if in fact she never has cut herself, I would suggest she look, in the future, towards her own experience, rather than co-opting a serious issue that afflicts so many. It is already misunderstood enough. Cutting does not need this sort of false publicity, this pseudo-understanding, this ingenuous "creativity."
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "celticlabyrinth" on July 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
Recovering from self-injury myself, I greatly know the struggles that you are faced with in inpatient treatment and in giving up this coping mechanisim. This book protrays self-injury in a way that the non self-injurer can understand and breaks some stigma, which I give it credit for. But it doesn't really "show" you what trully goes through a persons mind- a person who would actually hurt themselves for temporary relief. And although the protrayal of the residential treatment program DOES show some resembalence to most residential treatment programs, but not a lot. Normal residential treatment programs are unpleasent having just-out-of-college staff who don't know what they're doing and the extreme, almost sickening, structure of a treatment program. It also doesn't go into the normal parrels of quick revolving door inpatient treatments which USUALLY happen before someone goes to the extreme of a residential treatment facility. It also goes so much more into the graphics of self-injury instead of the EMOTIONS of self-injury. It's not a book I would recomend for someone in recovery, but I would recomend it to someone who does not have a history of psychiatric problems or self-injurious behavior.
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48 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Nancy E. on February 10, 2002
Format: Paperback
15-year-old Callie has been institutionalized for what she's doing to herself. She cuts her wrists, arms, and hands and she doesn't know why. It could be her parents who don't know how to deal or her brother who is very sick or maybe something else. She doesn't know. But she's not willing to ask for help. In fact she's not talking at all. She doesn't say a single word in therapy, or group therapy where both girls with eating disorders, and drug addictions talk about their problems. As Callie starts to come out of her shell and speak in therapy a new girl comes to the clinic who cuts herself and shows off her scars with pride. Cut is amazing book about an issue that is rarely dealt with in teenage literature but is often dealt with in real life. If you enjoyed books such as Girl interupted and want to learn more about self mutilation and mental hospitals, or just read a great YA book, this is for you. I reccomend this to anyone who's a fan of realistic teenage books.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Veronica Horta on May 25, 2003
Format: Paperback
Callie is a fifteen- year- old girl who does not use the word `normal' in her vocabulary. On the other hand, she knows far from `normal.' Callie feels that, "there's no rush, no relief. Just a keen, pulsing pain. I drop the pie plate and grasp my wrist with my other hand; dimly aware even as I'm doing it that it's something I've never done before. Never tried to stop the blood." She says this as she cuts herself. So, with her problem, she goes to an institution called Sea Pines (or Sick Minds like everyone likes to call it there.) Here, there are teens with cases such as anorexia, obesity, and even substance-abuse issues. Then there are others, like Callie, that suffer from behavioral issues. She cuts herself when others aren't looking. In the book Cut, she desperately turns to the blade of a paper towel dispenser in a restroom or even a metal strip from the cafeteria to feel that rush of relief, to make her happy.
Not only does Callie have a problem with cutting herself, but also she won't talk about it. At Sea Pines, there are daily meetings where everyone talks about their problems aloud and counselors try to help out with the issues. Callie won't say a word about it. She avoids looking the counselors in the eye so that she wouldn't be called on. Even when she was called on, she rebels and still won't say a word. Can Callie stay silent for so long? Will she handle it? She has to say something, right?
With an inspiring author like Patricia McCormick, how can anyone lose the chance of reading a great book like Cut? McCormick gives so much description and detail into the book that anyone can understand how the character feels. Find out when Callie will crack. Read Cut, by Patricia McCormick.
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