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Cut


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48 of 59 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Emotional and orginal
15-year-old Callie has been institutionalized for what she's doing to herself. She cuts her wrists, arms, and hands and she doesn't know why. It could be her parents who don't know how to deal or her brother who is very sick or maybe something else. She doesn't know. But she's not willing to ask for help. In fact she's not talking at all. She doesn't say a single word in...
Published on February 10, 2002 by Nancy E.

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79 of 85 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Superficial treatment of a deep subject.
I had expected more from this book when i bought it. After reading the summary on the back cover, i was hoping to read a serious novel that truly confronted the issue of self-injury (SI). Instead, i found the book to be lacking in depth and using SI as a gimmick to establish the lead character, Callie, in the setting of the book.
"Cut" is not a novel about the issue...
Published on September 12, 2003


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79 of 85 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Superficial treatment of a deep subject., September 12, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
I had expected more from this book when i bought it. After reading the summary on the back cover, i was hoping to read a serious novel that truly confronted the issue of self-injury (SI). Instead, i found the book to be lacking in depth and using SI as a gimmick to establish the lead character, Callie, in the setting of the book.
"Cut" is not a novel about the issue of cutting. It is a novel about a girl in an adolescent psychiatric ward. As written, the book is a very diluted version of "Girl, Interrupted," describing Callie's stay in the ward and some experiences with her therapist and with the other patients. With very little effort, this book could be rewritten as a story of a girl with an eating disorder or a substance abuse problem--the type of mental-health issue is unimportant to the plot.
If you are looking for a story about life in a psychiatric ward, written at a middle school level, this book is perfect and very readable. If, however, you are looking for a book for older teens or adults, or for a book specifically confronting the issue of self-injury, you will likely find "Cut" very disapppointing.
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48 of 54 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Creating a contrived "cutter" does nothing but harm, February 16, 2002
By 
Terrence Ibarra (Missoula, Montana) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
Look, i don't want to be really mean or anything. I just feel I really have to write a little review of this after seeing all these good reviews. I cut myself for four years, from 14 to 18. I know what it's about, I know why people do it. I have talked to so many others that have gone through the same things. Almost the only thing i found affirming, empowering in this book was the thought, about half way through, that I, too, could be a published author. And one with a little authenticity as well. Maybe I'm the only one, but I just got the feeling, from start to finish, that the author had never watched blood seep up through her skin, never waited those moments between the cutting and the release. Additionally, there are at least three jokes in this book taken almost, if not, word for word from "Girl, Interrupted." This book, "Cut," was about as genuine as the episode of 7th Heaven that dealt with the same subject. If you are struggling with this, if you are looking for some understanding, a little illumination, or, if you are a friend of someone who cuts themselves, or even if you are just looking for a book on this subject, look somewhere, ANYWHERE else. You will find no help, you will be unable to GIVE any help based on anything in this book. I'm not sure who was involved in letting this thing out, but perhaps they should reevaluate their criteria, not to mention their careers. As for the author, if in fact she never has cut herself, I would suggest she look, in the future, towards her own experience, rather than co-opting a serious issue that afflicts so many. It is already misunderstood enough. Cutting does not need this sort of false publicity, this pseudo-understanding, this ingenuous "creativity."
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's "okay", July 20, 2002
By 
"celticlabyrinth" (safe inside my skin.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
Recovering from self-injury myself, I greatly know the struggles that you are faced with in inpatient treatment and in giving up this coping mechanisim. This book protrays self-injury in a way that the non self-injurer can understand and breaks some stigma, which I give it credit for. But it doesn't really "show" you what trully goes through a persons mind- a person who would actually hurt themselves for temporary relief. And although the protrayal of the residential treatment program DOES show some resembalence to most residential treatment programs, but not a lot. Normal residential treatment programs are unpleasent having just-out-of-college staff who don't know what they're doing and the extreme, almost sickening, structure of a treatment program. It also doesn't go into the normal parrels of quick revolving door inpatient treatments which USUALLY happen before someone goes to the extreme of a residential treatment facility. It also goes so much more into the graphics of self-injury instead of the EMOTIONS of self-injury. It's not a book I would recomend for someone in recovery, but I would recomend it to someone who does not have a history of psychiatric problems or self-injurious behavior.
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48 of 59 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Emotional and orginal, February 10, 2002
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
15-year-old Callie has been institutionalized for what she's doing to herself. She cuts her wrists, arms, and hands and she doesn't know why. It could be her parents who don't know how to deal or her brother who is very sick or maybe something else. She doesn't know. But she's not willing to ask for help. In fact she's not talking at all. She doesn't say a single word in therapy, or group therapy where both girls with eating disorders, and drug addictions talk about their problems. As Callie starts to come out of her shell and speak in therapy a new girl comes to the clinic who cuts herself and shows off her scars with pride. Cut is amazing book about an issue that is rarely dealt with in teenage literature but is often dealt with in real life. If you enjoyed books such as Girl interupted and want to learn more about self mutilation and mental hospitals, or just read a great YA book, this is for you. I reccomend this to anyone who's a fan of realistic teenage books.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bak Middle School of the Arts- Mr. Felt's Review, May 25, 2003
By 
Veronica Horta (West Palm Beach, FL USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
Callie is a fifteen- year- old girl who does not use the word `normal' in her vocabulary. On the other hand, she knows far from `normal.' Callie feels that, "there's no rush, no relief. Just a keen, pulsing pain. I drop the pie plate and grasp my wrist with my other hand; dimly aware even as I'm doing it that it's something I've never done before. Never tried to stop the blood." She says this as she cuts herself. So, with her problem, she goes to an institution called Sea Pines (or Sick Minds like everyone likes to call it there.) Here, there are teens with cases such as anorexia, obesity, and even substance-abuse issues. Then there are others, like Callie, that suffer from behavioral issues. She cuts herself when others aren't looking. In the book Cut, she desperately turns to the blade of a paper towel dispenser in a restroom or even a metal strip from the cafeteria to feel that rush of relief, to make her happy.
Not only does Callie have a problem with cutting herself, but also she won't talk about it. At Sea Pines, there are daily meetings where everyone talks about their problems aloud and counselors try to help out with the issues. Callie won't say a word about it. She avoids looking the counselors in the eye so that she wouldn't be called on. Even when she was called on, she rebels and still won't say a word. Can Callie stay silent for so long? Will she handle it? She has to say something, right?
With an inspiring author like Patricia McCormick, how can anyone lose the chance of reading a great book like Cut? McCormick gives so much description and detail into the book that anyone can understand how the character feels. Find out when Callie will crack. Read Cut, by Patricia McCormick.
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64 of 81 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Cuts" to the Heart of the Issue, July 6, 2002
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
Fifteen-year-old Callie has a rare problem. She's not anorexic, she's not on drugs, and she's not bulimic. But she cuts herself. Soon she finds herself at a "residential treatment facility", Sea Pines (or "Sick Minds", as she calls it) and her hurt shows its face when she refuses to talk. Nothing seems to break the silence coming from Callie, and sometimes she just gets the urge to slice her skin, to see the blood...and it's like she's determined never to talk to her therapist. This book is a masterfully written story chronicling (in detail) the thoughts that whirl around in Callie's mind. It is filled with vivid and poignant emotions, and Patricia McCormick develops her main character well. Callie's relationships with the other girls at the treatment facility add subtle insights about human nature and the universal need of friendship. I enjoyed how Callie's family life and her reasons for "cutting" were slowly explored and explained in this novel-in a very natural and empathetic way, without being contrite. But the best thing about this book was its hopeful ending that leaves us with the feeling that Callie has emerged from her treatment stronger, wiser, and able to overcome the temptation to cut herself. I hope to see more from this author.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pretentious and Trite, November 24, 2005
By 
George (Chicago IL) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
I read this book a few years ago. At the time I was 15 and had over a year's experience with self-mutilation. Starving for the ability to relate to someone else, as most people do, I found this book and then began to voraciously read it. When I put it down an hour or so later, I felt betrayed, misunderstood, and completely insulted. This author cannot completely understand what it's like to hurt oneself or be institutionalized for it. The narrative does not portray at all what it's like to be locked into a place for weeks that's trying to reshape your entire self nor does she understand the desperateness of self-mutilation. If it's Mccormick's literary skills, or lack thereof, that hamper her characterization then she may need to rethink her profession; if it's her lack of experience that destroyed this book, then she needs to not attempt to vocalize someone else's struggle. I appreciate that someone is trying shed light on a new "problem," but as a person suffering from said "problem," I feel only ostracized and angry.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Real Life Issues, March 13, 2003
By 
Jenny Roskamp (Grand Rapids, MI USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
Cut by Patricia McCormick tells the chilling story of a teenage girl with an unusual addiction: cutting herself. This story goes inside a residential treatment facility to expose the world of teenage mental and behavior disorders. The most powerful aspect of this story is how easily it is to relate to the main character, Callie. Callie's story is not extreme: she feels that her family doesn't pay much attention to her, and she blames herself for her brother's illness. She finds relief in cutting herself. This works well for her until the school nurse notices her scares. Callie suddenly finds her self at Sea Pines, a residential treatment facility for teenage girls.
McCormick dives right into the thoughts and minds of this teenage girl as Callie is the narrator, and the story is told as if she is talking to her therapist. This book raises some important questions. When is a young person old enough to read a book that so vividly tells the story of girls who struggle with such heavy issues? Should issues such as suicide, self mutilation, pain and depression be discussed with children? How should these issues be discussed? McCormick describes a dark and grim reality for many teenagers today. Is it important for teenagers to be aware of such things? It is so easy to relate to Callie, so easy that it is scary for the reader to think "that could be me." Will Cut give teenagers a sense of hopelessness, or a sense of hope? This book starts out seemingly hopeless, with Callie refusing to talk to anyone, not even using her vocal cords. Eventually, as the reader goes on, a sense of control is gain. There is a sense that all is not hopeless, that Callie does have control over her situation.
This book is not to be taken lightly. This type of situation is very real for many teenagers and adults all over the world. Teenagers need to know that. Even so, this book should not be read without discussion. This book addresses some important, yet difficult issues that should not be looked over by anyone: adults or teenagers.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self mutilation never sounded so bad, January 19, 2005
By 
Student "Bob" (Cedar Rapids, IA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
Patricia McCormick's Cut is a review of all major medical problems facing today's youth. Callie, a cutter, is sent off to a troubled youth center with other girls that each have unique reasons to be there, such as anorexia and bulimia.

The book tells the story of a girl dealing with her problem and quite frankly; I don't think the other does very well writing about the problem. The book doesn't provide the clueless with reasons for cutting, something that needs to be known to relate, understand, and prevent the cutting obsession. Also, it doesn't seem like much research was done before the writing of the book. The girl McCormick writes about contradicts many traits of the real-life mutilator. One of my long-time friends is in counseling for cutting. Everything she says, the reasons and the defense, is absolutely gut wrenching. Cut doesn't deal with any of these and not once did I get the same emotions as I did from my friend. Even without relating to real life, Cut's storyline is somewhat boring and lacking all creativity. I'm sure there's a better book out there about teen self-mutilation; so don't waste your time with this one.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, December 30, 2005
This review is from: Cut (Paperback)
I read this book because someone told me to. me, being a former cutter, was greatly disappointed by the book. Calllie a girl at seapines cuts herself. There are other girls too with eating disorders and drugs issues, but they arne't mentioned enough for them to have an actual meaning in the book.

It's a quick read, but once I finished the book i was greatly disappointed. It had such a lame ending, there was somethign missing from the ending, liek the main reason for her cutting. Nothing intense happens in the book either, and the way she describes cutting herself isn't as great as i thought it would be.

This book seems to have a high rating to mostly those who haven't experienced cutting thinking that that is how it actually feels to cut. but there's a lot lacking from that, there's not much of an emotional side to it just the action.
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Cut
Cut by Patricia McCormick (Paperback - May 1, 2011)
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