Customer Reviews


987 Reviews
5 star:
 (729)
4 star:
 (143)
3 star:
 (45)
2 star:
 (19)
1 star:
 (51)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


1,209 of 1,237 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Appears solid, though slow changeovers and optimistic runtime
I bought the 1000VA model in this PFC series about a month ago to replace a fading APC Back-UPS ES 725. So far, performance has been encouraging.

My first impression upon opening the cleverly double-boxed packaging was that the picture size was deceiving. This CyberPower looks large. It's not. It's dwarfed by my standard mid-ATX towers. Eyeballed relative to...
Published on April 26, 2011 by D. Alexander

versus
221 of 242 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Drawbacks of This Unit
Although I agree with most of the positive comments of other reviewers, there are also some serious drawbacks to this unit that you should be aware of if you're thinking of buying one.

The first unit I received made a loud rattling noise whenever the fan came on. After discussing this with the very helpful and patient CyberPower tech support guy (and even...
Published on August 17, 2011 by Lucubration


‹ Previous | 1 299 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1,209 of 1,237 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Appears solid, though slow changeovers and optimistic runtime, April 26, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I bought the 1000VA model in this PFC series about a month ago to replace a fading APC Back-UPS ES 725. So far, performance has been encouraging.

My first impression upon opening the cleverly double-boxed packaging was that the picture size was deceiving. This CyberPower looks large. It's not. It's dwarfed by my standard mid-ATX towers. Eyeballed relative to one, it's about half the width, half the height, and two-thirds the depth. Positively petite for a tower UPS and roughly the size of the APC it replaced were that one upturned. Extras include a short coaxial cable and an RJ-11 phone wire. Build quality seems quite good, and the appearance in person is an attractive combination of gloss and matte black. Once booted, the UPS is completely silent with mains power. It buzzes quietly when on battery. There is no internal fan.

That said, let's drill down the major features of the PFC series:

Line-interactive - In the consumer world, there are three major types of UPS units: standby, line-interactive, and double conversion ("online"). Standby runs wall power straight to the device with minimal filtering unless it detects a major voltage change. Then it switches to battery. Line-interactive is the same, except with a filtering transformer between the wall and the device to handle most voltage variations. In an area with dirty power, line-interactive units won't cycle to battery power as often. With clean power, there's no practical difference between the two. Double-conversion means the battery powers the device and wall power only charges the battery. The isolation is helpful for sensitive things, but less efficient because the wall power is perpetually converted from AC to DC and back to AC. The heavy-duty inverter this type requires also tends to increase cost and noise.

Some areas will have greater voltage fluctuation than others. If you're in California and surrounded by industrial machinery, line-interactive or double-conversion is where you want to be.

Sine wave - When a UPS with this feature is on battery power, the cycling frequency of the AC it produces will be a pure sine wave instead of a blocky approximation. Most devices don't care. Some devices with a direct current path may care, as will electric motors and instruments that derive their timing from the power frequency. The majority of computers will work fine with any UPS, but certain power supplies with active power factor correction can have issues with the approximated sine output of lesser UPS units. If you buy a UPS without sine output, you'll find out immediately if there's a compatibility problem because the system will shut off when the UPS switches to battery. If the system continues to run, and it probably will if it's older or inexpensive, you're in the clear. Pure sine output is compatible with all computers and skirts the issue entirely.

This UPS has a capacity of 600W and 1000VA. You can ignore the second number if your hardware is recent or expensive. In the grand old days when the real power use of a computer (W) was 40% less than the apparent load to the power grid (VA), it made sense to specify more VA capacity than W. Now, though, with power factor correction (an attempt make the ratio of W:VA closer to 1:1) standard for years, the actual load is likely to be 90% or more of the apparent load. A 200W computer will probably use 200-225VA of capacity. You're therefore likely to reach the watt limit well before the one for VA.

Here's how the PFC models compare in maximum capacity, battery size, and runtime:

CP850: 510W max, 1 x 7 amp-hours = 8 min @ 255W, 2 min @ 510W
CP1000: 600W max, 1 x 9 amp-hours = 9 min @ 300W, 3 min @ 600W
CP1350: 810W max, 2 x 7 amp-hours = 9 min @ 405W, 3 min @ 810W
CP1500: 900W max, 2 x 8.5 amp-hours = 11 min @ 450W, 2 min @ 900W

While the latter two have USB charging ports and are physical larger to accommodate two batteries, all four otherwise share the same feature set.

Runtime doesn't scale linearly with load. A CP1500 feeding 100W may well last 60 minutes. At 900W, it'll last 2 minutes. That's a factor of 30 difference in runtime for only 9 times more load. To ensure your system stays on long enough to shut down properly, the expected draw shouldn't be more than about 70% of the maximum capacity. CyberPower's software can be configured to automatically shut down any single system via USB or serial, though the comments attached to this review note that older versions may write excessively to SSDs.

In my case, I've got a 12-drive file server, tower PC, router, switch, 24" LCD, and 32" LCD plugged in. The front-panel UPS LCD tells me that is an idle load of about 340W and 350VA. Projected runtime on my CP1000 is 6 minutes. A typical single computer and LCD monitor will draw 125W together. Gaming systems and larger screens, perhaps 150W-250W at idle. Most people with one system will find the CP850 adequate if they shut down soon after saving open work. Multiple systems or attempting to ride out a power loss would benefit from the CP1350 or above.

So how does the CP1000 perform? It's hard to say. It feels satisfyingly heavy even without the battery, but as I haven't torn it apart, it could well be filled with peanut brittle. There haven't been any lightning strikes, so the 1,030 joule surge rating (three times APC's typical rating) remains untested. Actually, the only stressor has been my laser printer. It's plugged into the same wall socket and when it heats up, the lights flicker and the UPS trips.

The switchover time from mains to battery isn't quite as fast with this Cyberpower. I know that because my APC caused a slight flicker on my LCD TV. This one gives a severe flicker that all but turns the TV off, though the other screen and the rest of the computer equipment are unaffected. It's also intolerant of overloads. Because a laser printer can easily pull 1200W or more, you're not supposed to plug one into any UPS outlet, battery-backed or not. I did by accident when I was moving cables around. The resulting shutdown and angry beeping was unsurprising. No docked stars for any of this, though I might have if the TV had actually turned off.

One niggle of note: my UPS took an usually long time to get past the initial startup. I spent about ten minutes pressing and holding buttons in accordance with the manual before it finally turned on. Since then, no similar issues, and I was alerted in a comment that it's possible to force the display to stay on by pressing and holding the display button until you hear a single beep.

All considered, I'd give this CyberPower a preliminary five stars. The APC lasted four years on the battery and five until the USB monitoring port went out, so that's the benchmark I hope it'll beat.

UPDATE 5/12:

I recently had an extended power outage. The estimated runtime was nine minutes at the start, but the UPS shut off in four or less even with a smaller load than above. This is significantly below Cyberpower's projections for this unit, so I'm docking a star. I would be tempted to choose a CP1500 if I were buying again. They come on sale for $150 or so every few months.

UPDATE 9/12:

I've had a new issue where the UPS stops powering all outlets for a few seconds at a time. No beeping or error messages ensue, but naturally, all devices turn off. The warranty for this unit is 3 years. Support has advised me to RMA. I'll update when that process is complete. Shipping to CyberPower was $18 through UPS. It's a very heavy package because they advise leaving the battery in.

UPDATE 10/12:

CyberPower has shipped me what appears to be a new unit. Turnaround time was a little over a week. No UPS signature was required. I didn't have any trouble turning this one on.

UPDATE 11/13:

No new issues to report. The replacement runs exactly as the original once did.

If you intend to downvote, please leave a comment. I do try to be accurate, I'd much prefer to know the issue.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


147 of 152 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for Home and Small Office, January 4, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS 1500VA 900W PFC Compatible Mini-Tower (Electronics)
Purchased this to replace an older UPS that wasn't compatible with my new Computer Workstation. I'm a Software Engineer and DataCenter SysAdmin by trade.

This unit works great at a fraction of the price of a "True SineWave" UPS I'd use in Server Rooms, and is suitable for workstations equipped with newer / high-end PFC (Power Factor Correction) Power Supplies.

I love the Onboard LCD, which shows a battery meter and a load meter; along with stats like Output Watts -- much like a kill-a-watt would show. You can decide whether to turn off the LCD on idle, or have it always on. I also love the fact that the Alarm can be silenced -- which is a huge blessing if you already know your power lines aren't stable, or if you have a need to intentionally run equipment on battery power for extended periods.

There's a USB and Serial port for monitoring, which (combined with software) can have your Workstation or Server gracefully shut down before all the power is drained. Though, with the LCD-based stats, you can still get all the info you need without a PC hooked up.

The USB Charging Ports in front have enough juice (Amps) for an iPad to charge.

The replacement battery cells are pretty common (go to a shop specializing in UPS Batteries), but "some assembly" is required to connect them to a "Harness/Wedge" between the cells. This is a common design for dual-cell UPSes, so your UPS battery shop may even have pre-assembled units ready for sale.

In sum: I got one for my workstation, and plan to get another for my entertainment room. At this price and the feature-set offered, this is a great buy. Well done, CyberPower.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


99 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great UPS, March 21, 2011
By 
Dennis W. Simpson "Dennis" (Carrollton, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
It's sine wave output means it can be used with the latest computers and entertainment electronics. It cost a bit more than a non-sine wave output unit, but it is well worth it.

However THIS UPS being a sine wave output unit, did not cause any of my new higher power, advanced electronics to reboot when I pulled the power plug from the wall. It can handle the most delicate electronics.

I bought a high power gaming PC and put it on a non-sinewave UPS from another company. Every time I pulled the plug from the wall, the computer rebooted! I then put the other UPS on my plasma TV setup, and when I pulled the power from the wall, the TV and the satellite receiver both rebooted! I thought I UPS was supposed to keep electronics going when the power fails.

The problem I found is that newer computers and high end consumer electronics use automatic PFC(power factor correction) power supplies which makes the power supply more efficient (uses less current) but a downside, is the usual square wave UPS upon loss of AC power will cause the power supply to reboot, causing the attached electronics to reboot. So much for a UPS letting those electonic items ride through a power failure or brown out. Just search the web for UPS Active Power Factor Correction for information on this.

However THIS UPS being a sine wave output unit, did not cause any of my new higher power, advanced electronics to reboot when I pulled the AC plug from the wall!

The unit is easy to use, and quiet. When not supplying battery power, there is NO fan. When supplying battery power or charging the battery, the fan is on, but it is very quiet. Another thing I like is that the output display shows both watts AND VAs of the load. Other UPSs I looked at did not show output VAs.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


205 of 215 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Video Review, September 13, 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS 1500VA 900W PFC Compatible Mini-Tower (Electronics)
Length:: 2:03 Mins

Review: CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD Pure Sine Wave Or Not?- see for yourself if it's a "Pure Sine Wave" (as advertised) or not.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


148 of 156 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last a quiet UPS, November 15, 2010
By 
This review is from: CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS 1500VA 900W PFC Compatible Mini-Tower (Electronics)
First of all I purchased this UPS a little in the dark because I just could not find any reviews on it at the time; I guess it was a new model. I am glad I did, it exceeds my expectations... why?

1.It is silent! At last, my old 1500VA UPS was not loud but the drone was always there, this little guy, not a peep, you can even silence all the alarms.

2. Great load, I have 3x 27" monitors and my all computer guff hocked up for a total of about 580 watts full load and the UPS is just fine with that (70% load), even showing 10+ minutes of run time if power goes out.

3.It really looks cool, if these types of things can be considered cool, my old UPS was an ugly box with some LEDs on the outside, this little unit has a dark with white LCD screen (which was why I got this model over the older one) you can set it to read out whatever you like(Run time, load, VA, %, Watts, input, batt, output etc) and you have it on always or go off after a minute or so.

4.Software, not that I will ever really use it I guess but nice to know it works first time (on Windows 7 64bit at least) have not tried it on my Mac yet.

Over all I am very happy and cannot find anything about this product I am unhappy about, if I do I will amend my review.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


221 of 242 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Drawbacks of This Unit, August 17, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS 1500VA 900W PFC Compatible Mini-Tower (Electronics)
Although I agree with most of the positive comments of other reviewers, there are also some serious drawbacks to this unit that you should be aware of if you're thinking of buying one.

The first unit I received made a loud rattling noise whenever the fan came on. After discussing this with the very helpful and patient CyberPower tech support guy (and even holding the phone near the unit so he could hear it), he concluded that the unit was defective. I swapped it for a new unit with Amazon (who were also very helpful), but I learned a number of things in the process.

When the fan was rattling, simply pressing gently on the side of the case in various spots changed the noise dramatically, in one case getting rid of it entirely for a while. The case flexed like a piece of paper. That's how I discovered that the plastic "case" is really just a thin skin around the internal components.

At the suggestion of the tech support guy, I tried opening up the battery case and partially sliding the battery out and back in, reseating the cables. It didn't help, but more than that, it turned out to be quite difficult -- the internal components are really jammed in. And I didn't even slide the battery out very far; I wouldn't look forward to actually replacing the battery. After forcing the battery and cables back in place, it was difficult to get the little door back in place properly. And I'm a strong guy with good manual dexterity (I fix and build lots of stuff).

My overall impression is that this unit is assembled like a really cheap toy. I don't know whether the defect was caused by lack of quality control in the factory, or damage while shipping, but I can see how this product could be easily damaged. (I suspect the company knows this too, since they seem to keep experimenting with different arrangements of foam padding each time they ship the product, both to me and to other customers who've reported mechanical damage in earlier reviews.)

The foregoing criticism has nothing to do with the electrical/electronic properties of the unit, of course, but it can still be a PITA. My earlier experience with UPS systems (I've owned a few) was that they had either sturdy metal cases, or at least heavy plastic.

Moving on... as luck would have it, I experienced a real blackout, lasting just a few hours, on the third day of testing the original (defective) unit. It performed properly (except for the rattle), preventing my system (tower computer, multiple hard drives, two monitors, external speakers, etc.) from crashing, and predicted almost a half hour of run time, which I thought was reasonable. However, I decided to shut down all the computer equipment (including the UPS) quickly, which I did. After shutting down everything but the UPS itself, the UPS display indicated a much longer run time than it had when the computer system was running off the UPS battery -- but not as much longer as I expected. It went from about 20 minutes (usually 25, but the battery was slightly depleted) to a prediction of about 90 minutes; under the circumstances I expected a prediction of several hours.

Since the unit had zero load (which it reported accurately), and since it couldn't recharge the battery (no wall current), I figured that it didn't have much to do at all and should run a long, long time. But the fan kept running. The tech guy later told me that in a blackout the unit has to consume battery power just to power its internal functions. Fair enough, but for such a minimal load (just monitoring the situation) it seemed to me that the fan should have gone off, and the fan was what was probably consuming most of the power.

Finally, a serious issue that will only be of interest to some Mac users. CyberPower doesn't supply separate software for the Mac (as they do for Windows), but they claim the unit is compatible with the Mac's built-in UPS software (which appears in the Energy Saver panel of the System Preferences if the Mac detects a UPS connected by USB). The CyberPower website claims the unit's firmware (build-in software) is Mac-compatible, and even shows screenshots of it running on a Mac. What they don't mention is that the screenshots are for a version of the Mac OS (Leopard/10.5) that was discontinued about two years ago, and that they apparently had never tested this specific UPS model with the current (at that time) version of the OS, Snow Leopard (10.6). The tech guy admitted that the screenshots are outdated, but more than a month later, I see they still haven't changed them.

Their driver may work with some of their models in Snow Leopard (I wouldn't know), but *this* model is NOT software-compatible with Snow Leopard. The Mac handshakes with the unit when you hook it up with USB, but the communication between the two after that is generally non-existent no matter what happens, or else crazily erratic. During the real blackout I experienced, plus circuit-breaker tests I did later with the (non-defective) replacement unit, it was clear that the Mac had no idea if there was an outage, thinks the battery charge is always "120 percent" (!) no matter what, but conversely might occasionally decide there's an electrical problem (when there isn't) and begin the countdown to shutdown for no reason. Or, conversely, after a real blackout and despite power having been restored, it might continue the countdown to shutdown. Usually the Mac simply does nothing in response to the unit. In fact, the software is worse than useless, and any Snow Leopard user should not connect the USB cable. (I haven't tested it in Lion.)

For my workflow, the software doesn't really matter to me -- when the Mac is unattended I put it to sleep anyway, and an electrical outage won't wake the computer to shut it down (the event is not a "network event" according to the tech guy). So I just unhooked the USB and treat the UPS as a "dumb" unit. But the software might matter to you, plus there's the issue of the credibility of a company that claims Mac compatibility for two years after that was no longer true, and shows obsolete screenshots without identifying them properly.

Other than those criticisms, I like the unit well enough, thought the tech support was excellent, and consider it a good value for the money.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


The manufacturer commented on the review belowSee comments
37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bad product, useless warranty, March 11, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS 1500VA 900W PFC Compatible Mini-Tower (Electronics)
This unit worked fine for approximately six months. It was always plugged in with much less than the maximum load, and handled self-tests plus a few short power outages with no problem. Then one day, the power flickered, and the unit cut off completely and made a loud constant beep. Of course, it cut power to my PC/monitor until I power-cycled the IPS (Interruptable Power Supply -- that's a joke, son). I turned everything back on and went to the CyberPower application to perform a self-test. Pressing the self-test button caused the device to turn off and immediately cut power to my PC/monitor. Well, that's not good for my computer.

So, faced with a $200 paperweight, I decided to use the warranty service. No problem, just mail it to us! Wonderful, the thing weighs a ton, so it cost a small fortune to ship (okay, ~$30). That should have been my first clue; a good company will pay for you to mail their broken device to them as a courtesy for the hassle. I extricated it from my entertainment center and mailed it off.

Approximately two months later, they got around to sending the unit back. I would say fixing it and sending it back, but it came back in the same condition -- they didn't actually fix it. I turned it on, plugged everything in, verified the load was acceptable (~100W), and tried a self-test. Immediate PC/monitor shutdown. It behaves the exact same way as it did when I sent it to them. I think all they did was put a sticker on it. Thanks CyberPower, but I don't feel like paying another $30+ to mail it to you again.

Just sharing my story to save you all the same hassle.

Update 10/21/2014 -- revising my score up to 3 stars. After venting on here, Cyberpower did cross-ship a functioning replacement that is still running strong. I hope the regular warranty replacement program has improved in the time since my experience! Thanks to Cyberpower for making things right.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

 
stem
The manufacturer commented on this review(What's this?)
Posted on Mar 15, 2013 7:47:55 AM PDT
This is not acceptable and certainly not indicative of either our quality products or the high level of service we provide. Please contact me directly at pmiesen@cpsww.com. I will ensure that we send a pre-paid shipping label to pick up your unit and cross-ship a replacement product. Thank you for your CyberPower purchase. Your complete satisfaction is our company's goal.
 
 

The manufacturer commented on the review belowSee comments
47 of 50 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Liked it at first but getting annoyed, June 18, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
After a recent thunderstorm took out my trusty six-year-old Belkin UPS, it was finally time for a replacement. After spending days comparing models from APC, Belkin, and CyberPower, I decided on this model. I am happy with my decision. The design is stylish and sleek with glossy accents around the the matte black body. Construction feels sturdy, although it weighs a ton. The outlets are in the rear. They are arranged in two vertical columns. There are two widely spaced plug at the top of each column designated for larger plugs. The vertical column on the left side is battery plus surge. The right column is surge only. There is no "master' outlet that controls all the other outlets, which is fine with me because I hate that feature. It is always more of an annoyance than an energy saver for me. In addition to AC outlets on the rear, there are two powered USB outlets on the front. I love this feature. You can charge USB devices such as MP3 players, smartphones, tablets or portable video cameras. You can also use it to power USB hard drives, optical disks, or any other USB powered device, assuming the USB cable is long enough. I use it to charge the multiple iPods in my household, thus saving me from purchasing another overpriced Apple AC iPod charger.

The LCD display is very informative. It displays information on the current voltage, load, UPS status, battery capacity and error messages caused by abnormal voltage or malfunction. The UPS does have AVR which helps protect your equipment during brownouts or other current fluctuations, and pure sine wave which is compatible with newer computers that are much more sensitive to the switchover to battery power. You can adjust the UPS sensitivity to power fluctuations which will make it even less likely that your PC will experience a reboot or blue screen if a switchover occurs. The UPS also operates primarily in green efficiency mode, bypassing the transformer until needed, resulting in less consumed power and lower heat emission. Load capacity is very good. Although it has an overload warning, I seriously doubt anyone would trigger it unless they plugged something like an iron, vacuum, laser printer, or other heavy current drawing device. The enclosed instructions do warn against connecting any large power consuming device to the battery protected outlets. I have an Intel iMac, a NAS unit, and laptop PC (in AC only column) plugged in so far.

The only negatives I've encountered so far are a short cord and difficult to reach outlets (if it's in a tight area like mine). My previous UPS had the outlets on top, which were much easier to use. Other than that, it's a great UPS and I'm glad I purchased it.

*****July 29, 2011 Update*****

This UPS is good, as long as you never need to turn it off. The power button is as flaky as it comes. The instructions say you can hold it for two seconds or 10-20 seconds. It's "supposed" to then power down. Now here's where things get ridiculous. Hold it too brief (1-1.9 sec), it won't initiate shutdown. Hold it too long but too brief (3-9.9 sec) and the shutdown will cancel. I've held it for the specified times and every duration in between and can NEVER get it to shut down. If you don't believe me, you can actually find the ridiculous shutdown instructions in the PDF user guide available on the support site for this UPS. Now, this is a big deal for me because I personally found out (rather frighteningly) that if you attempt to plug anything into this UPS while it is on, there is a very REAL risk of electrical shock. After a loud pop and electrical spark while plugging in a PC that was powered off, I decided to play it safe and never plug anything in while the UPS is on. Problem is, I frequently swap plugs. I need to change plugs occasionally but I can never shut this thing off without major headaches. This is so annoying, not only did I knock two stars off my original rating, but had I discovered this little flaw within my initial return period, I would have went with another UPS. Sad too because the rest of the operation seems so good, but this is so annoying, it would have definitely been a deal breaker for me, had I'd known coming in.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

 
stem
The manufacturer commented on this review(What's this?)
Posted on Mar 6, 2012 7:09:38 AM PST
The power off/on switch is a delay switch to prevent accidental shutdowns of the UPS system. To power off the UPS, depress the power button approximately 2 seconds until your hear 2 beeps, then release the power button. There should be no more danger plugging a device into the UPS then there is a typical AC wall outlet. If you suspect a problem or continue to have issues turning off the UPS, please contact our Tech Support Center at 877-297-6937. Your complete satisfaction is our goal.
 
 

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect in every way, June 16, 2012
By 
M. Anderson (Santa Ana, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS 1500VA 900W PFC Compatible Mini-Tower (Electronics)
I bought the CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD about a year ago to replace a UPS that had gone bad. Here's why I love it:

1. Visually appealling: The unit is visually appealing without being obnoxious. I use it with my entertainment center and it blends in well with the other electronics.

2. Informative: The LCD Display will show all manner of statistics, including input voltage, output voltage, wattage draw, percent battery life, charging status, and when the power goes out, an estimate of how much longer before it is going to die. There's even an option to shut the display off completely, so that the display isn't disruptive when you're watching TV in the dark.

3. Replacement batteries: CyberPower is one of the few UPS manufacturers that use standard Lead Acid batteries, and not proprietary battery kits. Many UPS manufacturers have created proprietary replacement kits and make additional money off you when you need to replace the internal batteries. Not CyberPower. In fact, as of today, they don't even sell batteries. Rather, they give you the industry standard model number and you can simply buy replacements. This unit, for example, uses two standary 12 volt 8.5-amp Lead acid batteries that you can buy for $18.00 each. The comparable APC requires a special battery kit costing $69.99.

4. Long run time: With the typical 100-watt draw that a computer and LCD monitor use, the unit will run for over 70 minutes!

5. Quiet: I've seen reviews of the comparable APC unit that complain that the comparable APC unit is noisy. I've never heard a peep out of this one, except for the beep sound it makes when the power goes out. And you can silence that noise if you want, either on a one-time basis or permanently.

6. Intuitive controls: There are four buttons on the front. Press the display button or the beep button momentarily to cycle through all the different informational screens. Press and hold the Display button for 2 seconds to switch the display between always on mode and on for 5 seconds after you press a button mode. Press and hold the beep button for 2 seconds to cycle between beep on and beep off mode (beep off mode means that it will not beep, even if the power goes out, and is confirmed with an on screen icon). Press and hold the Control button for 2 seconds to test the battery. Press and hold the power button for exactly 2 seconds to turn the unit off.

There is one thing that I wish that I knew before I bought this one: The CP1350PFCLCD is a bit cheaper and has the almost the same run time. The 1350PFCLCD uses 7ah batteries, while this one uses 8.5ah batteries. The 1350 also has a slightly lower maximum wattage output (810 Watts for the 1350 vs. 900 watts for the 1500).

The maximum wattage of most computer and monitor combinations today is well below both figures and the battery capacity is so close that I feel that there were no reason for me to spend the extra $40 for the more expensive model. I actually divide my entertainment center into two UPS's (TV on one, dish/xbox/audio on the other) and so I never use more than 300 watts on any UPS, so I could have saved $40.00.

Of course, all of these specs are posted on CyberPower's web-site, and so I have only myself to blame. :)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


The manufacturer commented on the review belowSee comments
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Buyer beware, December 27, 2012
If you receive a faulty unit like I did, be aware that amazon will not accept it back for a return. They consider it hazardous waste. I have to return the faulty unit to CyberPower for an exchange. I am told it will take 2-4 weeks to process.

I would have been better off purchasing it from some place like Best Buy where I could exchange it in the store.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

 
stem
The manufacturer commented on this review(What's this?)
Posted on Dec 28, 2012 8:05:47 AM PST
Mr. Watson, on behalf of CyberPower, please accept my apologies for receiving a faulty unit. As you can clearly tell from our reviews, that is not the norm with our product and certainly is not acceptable. We are currently working with Amazon on their misguided return policy. Our UPS systems have NO shipping restrictions. Please also understand that the 2 to 4 week time frame provided for a replacement unit is worst case scenario. We will make every effort to turn your unit around with a new system as quickly as possible. Thank you for your CyberPower purchase.
 
 

‹ Previous | 1 299 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.