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755 of 777 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile alternative to APC to consider:
I work as a network technician and have used APC equipment for many years. Their high-end units have always done well for us. For many years, I also used their Smart-UPS brand for my home network needs. As they've become old and had problems, it became more economical to replace them, instead of fixing them, especially, since for my desktops, the industry was moving to...
Published on October 26, 2008 by Mac Tech

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432 of 469 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Spend a little more money, get a lot more UPS.
I have several APC and Belkin UPS units in my house, so this isn't my first whack at buying a UPS. And after reading reviews here and other places, I thought the CyberPower model looked like a decent way for me to save a few bucks.

The first thing I noticed about it was how light it was for a UPS -- especially at 1000VA. For that capacity, I think this may be...
Published on April 27, 2009 by Kevin Nicholls


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755 of 777 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile alternative to APC to consider:, October 26, 2008
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I work as a network technician and have used APC equipment for many years. Their high-end units have always done well for us. For many years, I also used their Smart-UPS brand for my home network needs. As they've become old and had problems, it became more economical to replace them, instead of fixing them, especially, since for my desktops, the industry was moving to USB for signaling, and away from serial ports. My rack still has older 1400 VA SU units using SNMP management cards, but I needed a new desktop solution.

For the past three years, I stuck to APC's consumer products and have been very disappointed. They have more problems than the older units I've grown to love, and because they change models so often, it's harder to find a battery replacement. Plus, they just have a sort of cheapness about them.

With my latest computer purchase, a dual quad Mac Pro, my older 800VA APC just couldn't handle it. So, I decided to try this Cyberpower 1500 and have been very pleased with it, using it for about 2 months so far. The signaling and reported time is more reliable than the APC I was using. Although it should be said, any consumer UPS will not guarantee exact runtimes, load measurements, etc. - For what you are paying for this amount of capacity, some sacrifice must be realized. If you do your calculations correctly, and use it as needed (surges, brown-outs and limited black-outs), these units will fulfill your needs. If you need super accurate measurements and reliable AC power generation, then you should consider a high end unit, such as what APC offers for data centers.

The load reading for this unit, when measured with a Kill-A-Watt is pretty accurate. I like the soft blue lighting with auto-off. I connect my two, 24" LCDs to the APC 800VA unit, and the Cyberpower handles the Mac Pro with three, external FireWire drives with no problems. Testing it, by turning off the circuit breaker (shouldn't pull the cord from the wall), reports about 20 minutes of runtime, which seems about right. I've left it on battery power for about 10 minutes, and the readings remained fairly constant. I live out in the country at the end of our power grid, so I get a lot of "dirty" power. Brown-outs are common, and my larger UPS units have the ability to generate statistical logs each day of the power fluctuation. I feel pretty safe with this unit, and wouldn't hesitate to purchase another one.

Lastly, the software both Cyberpower and APC provides for the Mac OS, is really bad! I prefer to just use the Mac's SysPrefs to configure the UPS settings and leave it at that. Both companies desperately need a re-write of their OS X software.
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317 of 328 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Functional and stylish, very nice bells & whistles, March 19, 2008
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I'm not quite ready to nominate it for MoMA's permanent collection, but the CyberPower CP1000AVRLCD does look a lot better than your average geekbox. In fact, it's the first UPS (uninterruptable power supply) I've ever owned that I can easily tolerate having on a corner of my desk, where it has now quietly buddied up with a stack of external LaCie drives (the drives and the UPS all have round blue power-on indicators).

The CyberPower features a three-inch front-panel readout, backlit in (what else?) blue, that, with each consecutive push of the oversized display button, tells you in big digits what the current load is, the voltage it receives from the wall outlet, the estimated run time, the total load capacity, the battery capacity, even how many minutes remain after a blackout occurs and the battery is running down. The display turns itself off after 20 or 30 seconds, so it's not too distracting (actually, the user should have the option of keeping the display on, but I suppose you can't have everything).

When a blackout strikes, the CyberPower unit intermittently beeps to signal that the battery has kicked in -- but unlike other UPS's I've used, you can switch off the annoying beep in acknowledgment.

I deduct points for the nine outlets being so closely spaced together that any device powered by a wallwart will take up two or even three spaces.

Cyberpower also shortchanges Mac users by not giving them full-featured power management software. You can control the behavior of the battery backup through the Energy Saver control panel in OSX, which recognizes the brand and model of the UPS and lets you decide how you want to safely power down the computer and the other plugged-in devices in case of a blackout. So far so good. But the native Mac software won't let you instruct other applications to autosave and quit. That means unsaved documents will prevent applications from shutting down unless you're there to manage the process; and when the Cyberpower's battery depletes itself, the result will be the same as if you had no UPS to begin with -- the computer eventually shuts off as if you'd literally pulled the plug, and unsaved changes will be lost.

Still, that's not a dealbreaker for me; long ago I've gotten into the habit of hitting command-S every couple of minutes when I'm working on a document.

FWIW, the estimated battery run time of my configuration -- a 24-inch iMac with a 2.4Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo chip, plus three external drives -- is about 16 minutes.

Oh yeah: the unit has a swappable battery and three-year warranty. Not too shabby.

UPDATED, August 2012: It's still going strong. I just bought this product again, a second one, to plug in an extra computer and additional hard drives. Hope to have them for many more years -- ready to save my computer equipment from surges, blackouts, and brownouts at a fraction of a moment's notice.
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209 of 218 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It Works Well., February 20, 2008
By 
BB (Upstate, NY) - See all my reviews
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I've had this device for ~3 months and during that period the power has gone out twice for many hours and has "blinked" 5 or 6 times. Half the outlets in the back of the unit provide battery power and surge protection and the other half are just surge protection. I have my Dell XPS710 PC, 20" LCD, and two external USB drives connected to the battery power and my router, modem, speakers and printer connected to the surge protected outlets. It kept my machine running for over 25 mins. when the power went out. My XPS710 is a big gaming rig, so that is just fine. All I need is enough time to finish whatever I'm doing and shut down properly. My PC ran without a hiccup. Same with the power "blinks." They do not affect my PC at all. Plus, it keeps track of all the outages. For a lesser PC, this unit would probably sustain power for much longer. I highly recommend it for protecting any important equipment.

Also, the software will automatically shut down your PC at a pre-set time (i.e., 5 mins of battery power left) in case you lose power when you are not home. Don't forget to download the latest version of the PowerPanel software at the CyberPower website.
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240 of 256 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful Light-Duty UPS with Some Obvious Design Oversights, August 8, 2008
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My home and home office contain many sensitive electronic devices. We have several personal computers, a PC server, NAS drives, routers, switches, printers, cordless phones, security system, etc. All of these things (and more) plug into the AC mains and are therefore vulnerable to voltage sags or spikes and the occasional power outage. When a person invests a lot of money in electronic hardware, it only makes sense to do everything you can to protect it. That is why I always discourage people from plugging these sensitive devices directly into the wall. I currently have a total of 10 UPS systems and two line conditioners in my home, which protect my most valuable computer, security and A/V equipment.

Over the years the cost of power conditioners and Uninterrupted Power Supplies has dropped drastically, and yet the overall reliability and performance of these have improved a great deal. A typical UPS used to be thought of as a simple battery backup device. But today the majority of UPS systems also help to condition the power, to a degree, using technologies such as AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulation). There are several different types of UPS systems available, offering a wide range of output capacities and power conditioning capabilities. Of course the price goes up as your need of greater output and more sensitive voltage protection increases. But for some devices you can get by with a modest UPS system, to simply provide a moderate amount of power protection and battery backup time. This "modest" category is where the CyberPower CP850AVRLCD UPS fits in.

Model numbers of these UPS systems can be a little confusing, as many people think that the model reflects the output level of the device in watts. The model number of most UPS systems actually reflects the volt-amp rating, whereas the continuous watt load the unit can handle is usually a fraction of that VA rating, in terms of AC output. Calculating the exact watt output the UPS can sustain, strictly based on the VA rating, can be a little tricky since the AC load is not usually in precise phase. However, if you look up the specs of a given UPS system, the manufacturer usually indicates the maximum watts that the device is meant to sustain. In the case of the CyberPower CP850AVRLCD, the VA rating is 850 but the watt output rating is 510. That is a 60% difference between the VA and Watt rating.

This CyberPower UPS provides Automatic Voltage Regulation, shown by the letters "AVR" in the model number. This means that the UPS is capable of decreasing (Buck) or increasing (Boost) output voltage, slightly, in order to "clean" the power it is passing through to your electronic equipment. This is, or course, while the UPS is receiving AC power through your mains. If the voltage exceeds the minimum or maximum voltage tolerance, the system will automatically switch over to battery power, in order to protect your electronic equipment. The included PowerPanel Personal Edition software allows you a modest adjustment to these minimum and maximum voltage tolerance levels. The software also clearly displays the current status of the UPS, including voltage supplied, voltage condition, remaining battery capacity, battery status, remaining battery runtime and the current battery backed up load on the system. PowerPanel Personal Edition allows you to adjust the amount of time that your computer will remain running on battery power before shutting down. Of course you can choose to set the UPS to allow your computer to run as long as possible, but the UPS will still shut down your computer when it is down to only 5 minutes of remaining time. Therefore you will need to consider how much of a load your current equipment will put on the UPS, as too much load could cause the UPS to shutdown your computer almost immediately after an AC power failure. There is also a configuration screen for alert sounds, which allows you to enable or disable the beeping sounds this UPS would normally make during power events. There is not much more you can do with this software, which really limits its overall usefulness.

Some of the most important technical specifications of this device are as follows:

* UPS Topology: Line-Interactive
* Voltage Input: 90Vac - 140Vac
* Plug Style: Right Angle
* Cord Length: 6 feet
* Output: 850VA / 510 Watts
* AVR: Yes
* On Battery Voltage: 120Vac +/- 5%
* On Battery Frequency: 60Hz
* On Battery Waveform: Simulated Sine Wave
* Battery & Surge Outlets: 5
* Surge-Only Outlets: 4
* Overload Protection: Internal Circuitry Limiting/Circuit Breaker
* Transfers Time: 4ms
* Runtime at Half Load: 7 min
* Runtime at Full Load: 1 min
* Battery Type: Sealed Lead Acid - 12V/8.5Ah
* Typical Recharge Time: 8 Hours
* Surge Suppression: 1,080 Joules
* Phone/Ethernet RJ11/RJ45: 1-In, 1-Out (combo plug)
* Coax Protection (RG6): 1-In, 1-Out
* Computer Interface: USB x1 - Serial x1
* Dimensions (in): 10 1/4" x 4 3/8" x 8 7/8"
* Weight: 16 lbs.
* Product Warranty: 3 Years Limited
* Connected Equipment Guarantee: Lifetime
* CEG Amount: $250,000

The majority of my UPS systems are made by APC. However, I wanted to try a CyberPower unit, so I purchased this smallish 510 Watt unit to provide conditioning and battery backup for a DSL modem, an Ethernet Router, a wireless access point, and a 16-port Gigabit switch. The total load of this attached hardware is only about 45 to 50 watts, at full working load. Therefore this UPS should provide battery backup long enough for me to do some moderate Internet browsing from another UPS powered PC or wirelessly from a laptop. Setup of the CyberPower UPS was completely effortless. You don't even have to hook up cables to the internal battery, which is something that all APC units require. Upon powering up the CyberPower UPS I was greeted with a nice blue LCD display, which can be toggled to show current load level, estimated run time, input voltage, output voltage, output frequency, battery capacity, and the current status of the UPS (normal AC, battery in use, AVR in use, if system overload is detected, if audible sound is enabled or disabled, or if there is a household wire fault). I think this LCD status display is very useful. However, CyberPower has decided that the consumer does not need the LCD to remain lit, for real-time monitoring. Therefore you will find that the LCD will shut itself off after about 20 seconds, unless you push the toggle button, which lights it back up again as you switch between status screens. I find this extremely annoying, as I like to be able to monitor input voltage and current power load by just glancing at the display. All of my APC UPS systems, with LCD displays, allow me to set the backlight to remain lit at all times. I just don't understand why CyberPower would not provide this ability. I don't like it when a manufacturer makes a decision for me that I don't need something, even though I specifically paid for a UPS with an LCD display. Since I paid for it, I want to see it. I don't want to have to crawl under the desk to push the doggone toggle button, just to activate the backlight so I can see the display. The engineer that designed this shortcoming should be fired!

Overall I am quite pleased with the CyberPower CP850AVRLCD UPS. It offers a reasonable amount of useful features, has plenty of backed-up (5) and surge-only (4) outlets, includes Automatic Voltage Regulation, and has a compact footprint. The battery runtime is rather low, especially when used for a mid-level or high-end PC and monitor. But for my low wattage needs, this UPS should keep my DSL modem, router, wireless access point and Ethernet switch up and running for quite some time. The LCD display shows, under the average 45 watt load I have, it will run for approximately 94 minutes. I almost expect that it will likely last even longer than that. My biggest complaints with this UPS are the weak software that CyberPower provides, as well as the unchangeable sleep mode that the LCD display goes into. CyberPower has really dumbed down this otherwise impressive UPS device. The product itself is a worthy, full-featured UPS system, but CyberPower has restricted user configuration to the point that it just can't compete with other big players in the market, like APC. For a very basic computer user, this UPS could be a good, low cost solution. But for advanced users, who demand more control of their UPS settings and features, the CyberPower CP850AVRLCD simply falls short. I think the folks at CyberPower should consider updating their PowerPanel Personal Edition software, to allow more control of voltage tolerances, automatic computer shut down, LCD backlight mode (choices for sleep mode and always on), and the ability to setup a computer hibernation rather than simply shutting down the computer. Maybe some of their higher end (more expensive) UPS systems allow for these settings, but I definitely feel that they should consider adding these abilities to models like the CP850AVRLCD as well. I could easily give this UPS 5 stars if the software was more useful and the LCD display were user controllable, but as it stands now I can only give it 4 stars at best. Everything else about this UPS is solid and well designed, so I recommend it for basic computer users that do not require power user features and configurability.
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432 of 469 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Spend a little more money, get a lot more UPS., April 27, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I have several APC and Belkin UPS units in my house, so this isn't my first whack at buying a UPS. And after reading reviews here and other places, I thought the CyberPower model looked like a decent way for me to save a few bucks.

The first thing I noticed about it was how light it was for a UPS -- especially at 1000VA. For that capacity, I think this may be the lightest UPS I've used. I also liked the LCD display, but was a bit put off by the construction of the unit. The plastic is relatively flimsy (compared to other brands), but on the upside, there are a generous number of outlets.

After charging the unit overnight, I decided to give it a test run. The display showed I had about 18 minutes of runtime, so I pulled the plug. Instantly, 18 minutes became 8... then 6... then 2... then... darkness. Alas, there was no graceful shutdown on my computer (despite it recognizing that the UPS was connected), and it kept my setup alive for all of five minutes, at best.

For reference, the UPS had a last-gen MacPro, cable modem, router, and a 23" LCD connected. According to APC's configuration tool (which should be universal for any UPS), they recommended an APC Back-UPS RS 800VA @ 63% capacity and 13 minutes of runtime. At minimum, the CyberPower UPS should have been able to match that.

In a business environment where I had a generator that automatically kicked on, I wouldn't really care too much, as that's enough time to carry everything over to generator power. But at my house, I either want the computer to shut down when I'm not there, or I want the UPS to give me enough time to go turn on the generator. Unfortunately, neither are possible with this UPS.

When you consider how close in price this is to the 1375VA BackUPS from APC (which also has a similar LCD display), or even closer to the 1000VA Belkin UPS, the few dollars you save isn't worth the risk when your power actually does go out.

I'm sure this is fine if you're overbuying in terms of capacity, or if you're just looking for a voltage regulator and don't care about uptime. But as a UPS, there are several better options available.
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96 of 102 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars CyberPower doesn't honor their warranty, June 15, 2010
By 
D. Rich "doug" (Austin, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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I bought this unit on 4/3/2010 and it had problems from the very beginning. Would not turn on with out holding down the display button.
I submitted a support ticket and a claim on 5/23 and initially was contacted by a support tech. His first response was some canned email that was way off the mark. When I ask him to respond to all the information in my inquiry he said that the unit was indeed defective and he would get the claim process moving along for me. The unit doesn't stay on when you remove power then to boot it back up you have to hold down the display button for a good 60seconds. It also fried one of my flat panel monitors. So no one ever got back to me and I have left voice mails and sent three follow up emails. No one is calling me back no one is returning my emails.

Very disappointed in this company.
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent in (almost) every way, February 7, 2008
By 
Patrick (San Diego, CA) - See all my reviews
I just returned a Belkin F6C550-AVR and got this CP850AVRLCD instead. It's *much* better than the Belkin in every way but one: The Belkin can tell the computer to Hibernate in case of outage, while the CyberPower can only tell it to Shutdown. Guess what, if you're not at your desk or are asleep when a 10-15 minute outage happens, you still lose any unsaved changes. Might as well have a garden variety surge protector. If you leave your machine running, and you live where sustained outages are a problem, then this unit might not be for you (unless CyberPower decides to update the software, hint hint.)

But the good things are:
1) Nice form factor
2) When charged and nothing is plugged into it, it only draws 7 watts.
3) Software is intuitive and easy to use. Gives you all the useful status info you need
4) LCD panel is very nice. Also gives you the status info you need.
5) AVR - seems to be a true line-interactive regulated supply

So anyone from CyberPower, if you're reading this, please submit this feature request to enable hibernation in the PowerPanel Personal software. It's a gaping hole in the feature set of this product. (BTW, I'm running version 1.2) If this feature is added, my review changes to 5 stars. Thanks.
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165 of 186 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Lasted 7 months...., June 4, 2010
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I purchased this unit in October, and my power only went out once since. Suddenly, in May, everything that was plugged into the device (my PC and monitor) turned off, and the UPS emitted a long beeping sound. I called tech support, and was told that my battery most likely died. I was sent two replacement batteries roughly a week and a half later. I installed the two batteries, but to my dismay, the device still did not work. I contacted tech support, and was told I would have to pay to ship the unit back to them, they would fix it, and mail it back to me (as stated in their terms of warranty). Needless to say, the unit is quite heavy and is somewhat costly to ship. When I asked what assurance they could give me that the device would not fail in another 7 months (forcing me to pay for shipping yet again), I was told that if that happens, they would mail me a new one. I asked why they could not mail me a new one now as I have already been weeks without the UPS, I was told in a snarky tone by an uninformed tech support lackey named "Jeff" it's not "how they do things".

Anyway, I will be buying a better UPS than this. It is a shame that a company which I have heard so many good things about would sell defective devices, and pass the cost on to you.

UPDATE: 7/7/2010:
For kicks, I sent my UPS in, and within a few weeks they sent me a "new" unit. The unit I was sent was actually the same one (I checked the model numbers before I mailed it out), and it still did not work. Every time I plugged anything to it (even a small lamp) it did not power the device from an outlet. It used the battery, and emitted one long solid beep. Needless to say, I was irate, and complained to their tech support. This time they sent me a label to mail the unit to them and assured me a new unit would be sent out. It's been about 3 weeks and I still have not received any word from them about the status of the unit I mailed to them nor when a new unit would be mailed to me.

UPDATE 7/21/2010:
The unit finally arrived, it is new, and finally works. It took me threatening to report them to the better business bureau, but they finally honored their own warranty.
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45 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Works like a champ, August 16, 2008
By 
AVJGUY (Templeton CA) - See all my reviews
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I've had my Cyberpower 1350 for almost a year now and it has worked well switching to backup power dozens of times. I have a large desktop with two raptor HD's and two standard HD's, an IBM 19" CRT monitor, a Viewsonic 22" LCD monitor, a Canon 9000Pro printer, canon 8400F scanner and several other small periferals that have never blinked an eye during power outages. My only concern is that when the UPS is powering the system you can smell a slight 'electronic' odor from the unit as the internal fan always kicks on high while in backup mode. I doubt it is a problem as it continues to work over and over. I love the display. I use a little under 300 watts continuous and I figure it is much better to have a UPS too big so that it won't have a hard time powering the system and of course it will last longer in case you really need to get something finished. I had an older cyberpower unit for nearly six years before the batteries died, and it also did a great job, so considering my computer is on 10 to 16 hours a day I think Cyberpower deserved my repeat business.
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63 of 69 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Honoring their quarantees, June 21, 2011
I would like to put out a "buyers beware" for anyone thinking about purchasing a surge protector/battery backup system. CyberPower a company out of Shakopee MN does not stand behind their replacement guarantee. We had purchased 2 of their battery/surge protector units. During an electrical storm one of them was hit. I heard it and it made a beep sound after. My computer, DSL server asnd monitor hhad to be replaced. I sent the old unit in to Cyberpower and they told me there was nothing wrong with it. That is a impossible. The computer tech validated what happened. When I phoned CyberPower the customer service rep did not even look up my name in the system or anything. I would strongly advise anyone who wants peace of mind using their protectors NOT to purchase one from this company.
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