Customer Reviews


11 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars indexed historiographed and forgotten
In 1994, Doug Rushkoff set out to write an embedded, analytic travelogue linking a series of countercultural trends dealing with emerging networks and internet technologies. Instead of conducting technopunditry from the sidelines, Rushkoff got into the fray and followed around ravers, hackers,performance artists and writers whose philosophies emerged around a new surge of...
Published on June 7, 2003 by R. Abraham

versus
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting First Book On Cyberculture
'Cyberia' (1994) was cyberculture theorist Douglas Rushkoff's first book, written in 1992 and delayed because the publishers felt that e-mail and the Internet were not likely to become significant.
'Cyberia' has its obvious flaws in retrospect - examples regarding the links between drug culture, hacking, the Internet, and computers that have since become well-known...
Published on April 19, 1999 by Alex Burns (alex.burns@disinfo...


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting First Book On Cyberculture, April 19, 1999
This review is from: Cyberia: Life in the Trenches of Hyperspace (Paperback)
'Cyberia' (1994) was cyberculture theorist Douglas Rushkoff's first book, written in 1992 and delayed because the publishers felt that e-mail and the Internet were not likely to become significant.
'Cyberia' has its obvious flaws in retrospect - examples regarding the links between drug culture, hacking, the Internet, and computers that have since become well-known or overdone. Sometimes the tone is uncritical - probably because Rushkoff was so excited about the future potential of VR, the Internet etc. This book was written well before the Internet became the latest quarterly profit enhancer, well before the rise of Internet shopping malls and dubious e-mail chain letters. On its initial release, it made a significant impact, speeding up public acceptance of the Internet as a communications medium, and heralding the cultural 'future-shocks' regarding personal identity that will accompany it. Criticism is also prompted by a backlash against the author and his success.
'Cyberia' is best read as the author's first book, which succeeds in capturing the hope of a moment and sense of an underground movement that was pre-'Wired' magazine and pre E-commerce. There are some powerful sections such as a gonzo trip to the offices of 'Mondo 2000' and meetings with R.U. Sirius; Rushkoff checking out college colleagues entering Silicon Valley and being forced to take drug tests; and talks with Ralph Abraham, Timothy Leary, and Terence McKenna.
Read critically but thoughtfully.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars indexed historiographed and forgotten, June 7, 2003
In 1994, Doug Rushkoff set out to write an embedded, analytic travelogue linking a series of countercultural trends dealing with emerging networks and internet technologies. Instead of conducting technopunditry from the sidelines, Rushkoff got into the fray and followed around ravers, hackers,performance artists and writers whose philosophies emerged around a new surge of technoutopianism; linked inextricably with paganism, spirituality, and Eastern Philosphy. His aproach echoes the Tom Wolfe school subjective reporting, learning the lexicon of the object of study, trying to speak the language and reveal something about its psychology. What results is some snappy, breakneck prose colored philosophically and poetically by chaos mathematics and cyberpunk literature. This makes this book eminently fun, readable, and exciting. It also makes much of its proposed social and political uses for technology widely inaccurate. In a way, ten years removed, Cyberia should be appreciated now more than ever. We know better. And all of the wide-eyed fantasizing about decentralized spirituality and some wonderful fin de siecle millenial rapture spurned on by virtual reality are no longer dangerous or deluding, they can be seen in context, as thought waves that are spilled out of more optimistic time periods with exponential technological growth. The connect the dots game that Rushkoff plays is pretty astute, as well: the hippy connection, the second wave optimism that the 90s proposed to reconcile the "defeat" of the 60s, the fulmination of rave culture around these ideas that arrived in Berkely. A good book to read this book against would be Escape Velocity by Mark Dery, which is a little more "down to Earth", covers some similar material, and contains a counterpoint to Cyberia. Rushkoff himself has distanced himself widely from the rhetoric used in this book, but even this does not discredit this as a seminal text when looking at the viewpoints of subcultures built around technology.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A unique and detailed description of an emerging reality, July 29, 1996
By A Customer
This review is from: Cyberia: Life in the Trenches of Hyperspace (Paperback)
_Cyberia_ is a refreshingly complete account of what Leary
called "Cyber Culture." Focusing on the San Francisco Bay
Area, this book explains the various means by which people
travel to 'cyberia'. From all night raves, to paganism, to
super potent hallucinogens - people attempt to adapt
themselves for the future.
Each section of the book is well balanced and covers its
topic well. The book is still current, and the one flaw
that comes to mind is that the rave section focused too much
on house, ignoring other types of music.
All in all, an excellent book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What we have been thinking for years., August 9, 1999
By A Customer
Even though Rushkoff is apparently a foreigner to rave culture, I have to give him credit. Few people understand how techno/house, raves, drugs, chaos theory, and philosophy can blend together. As a math/philosophy/computer/music student, and curator of hillhaus.com, i have to give him credit for being able to write such an encompassing piece of literature all the while being a stranger to the culture. The tone of the book towards traditional capitalism and conservatives reminds me of Naked Lunch.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars TechnoShamanism, Morphogenetics, occasional mistake, January 3, 2001
This review is from: Cyberia: Life in the Trenches of Hyperspace (Paperback)
I found this book truly intriguing. The bits about the rave culture were a little off, and in the cases of his ecstasy coverage, very far off, but in general, it hits very close to the mark. I and many others that I associate with touch on the Technoshamanic view of the world. Rushkoff does an exceedingly good job demonstrating the relationships between psychadelics and innovation in areas like silicon valley and chaos theory mathematics. Read for yourself, judge for yourself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great eye and mind opener, May 22, 1998
By 
P. C. Van Dongen (Den Haag, Netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Cyberia: Life in the Trenches of Hyperspace (Paperback)
After reading this book, I thought about technology and all that encompasses it in a completely different way. Simply excellent.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars an enjoyable read, October 21, 2002
Rushkoff takes the reader on an elegant tour de force of the vast realm called "cyberia." With an uncanny ability to infuse humor and insights into his subject matter, he never lets the reader down.
The pulse of his books is reminiscent of the feeling you get at clubs when things are happening at a fast clip and a heated beat. The intelligence and forward-thinking Rushkoff offer make him unique and well worth the read.
Bravo!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Drugs not cyberspace, November 7, 2005
Under the guise of being a "theory" and "lifestyle" view of the communities arising around cyberspace, this book bats around the usual suspects - chaos theory, new cultures, modern life - and then degrades into a comparison between computer use and drugs. I will not deny the role drugs, specifically marijuana and LSD, have in computers, but to claim cyberspace requires much talk about drugs because it is a similar experience (seeing pretty images and designs in front of your face, even if they're not "there" in real life) is a bit of a stretch. Because the author spends his time discussing drugs, hippies, alternative lifestyles and other tangentially-related dreck, he fails to honestly explore hacker culture or even those who are advancing the concepts of cyberspace as something other than a consensual hallucination. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone except a researcher, as with the exception of a few pop quotes from famous computer and drug users, it's contentless and a moderately tedious read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a good book., April 23, 2000
By 
I read lots of these books. I have read most of Neal Stephenson's, Bruce Sterling's, and William Gibson's novels. This is a good book if you have interests in this area. The people who gave bad reviews are just not smart enough to understand the book's content, if they even finished reading it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cheap attempt to cash in on a trend, July 29, 1999
Rushkoff perused sfraves *the internet based mailing list* for about a year, hung out on hyperreal.org, read one too many copies of wired mag, and decided to string together a silly theory of "techno shamans". while there may be some legitimacy, at least conceptually, to the merger of technology, electronic music, and counter culture, it this book does not reflect it. this book felt like some rich, fat, publishing company sent the youngest ad exec with 'kewl clothes' to check out 'the rave scene and bbs's' and reported back what he found. what he found were people like him : poseurs trying to cash in on the next big thing. too bad he was 2 years too late. next time try reading 'altered states', or 'generation ectasy'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Cyberia: Life in the Trenches of Hyperspace
Cyberia: Life in the Trenches of Hyperspace by Douglas Rushkoff (Paperback - April 1995)
Used & New from: $0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.