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Cyborg Mass Market Paperback – July 12, 1984

4.6 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews
Book 1 of 4 in the Cyborg Series

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Mass Market Paperback, July 12, 1984
$200.82 $13.79

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Del Rey (July 12, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345316207
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345316202
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 3.9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,811,062 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Cyborg by Martin Caidin I first read this book in the mid-seventies when I was a great fan of the Six Million Dollar Man TV series. It was probably the first adult (in the non-pornographic sense) book that I had read. It is an enjoyable and informative read (although the science will now be hopelessly outdated) but at the time what impressed me most were the differences from the TV show. Austin loses his left rather than his right arm; the bionic eye cannot see and is 'merely' a miniature camera; the governmental atmosphere is less cosy with Oscar Goldman a shadowy figure and Oliver Spencer (featured only in the pilot TV episode) the major protagonist. Interestingly the early episodes of the TV show did reflect some of Austin's resentment at being transferred into a government superspy. It's both a pity and somewhat surprising - in view of the TV show - that this title is no longer available. I would certainly like to read it again even though it had such an impact on me that I remember parts of it very well. Terence Teevan
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Format: Hardcover
Although it's been many years since I read this, I remember lending it to several of my friends in college, and they loved it so much that I eventually never got it back.

This book was, of course, the basis for the popular cheesy '70s show "The Six Million Dollar Man". But this book is anything but cheesy. Steve Austin is an astronaut/pilot involved in the very real, very dangerous and exciting NASA "lifting body" program of the late '60s and early '70s, a program devoted to finding an acceptable design for the Space Shuttle. Martin Caidin, the author of this book, was a doctor who actually participated in this program, and he was actually at Rogers Dry Lake bed when Bruce Peterson plowed his M2-F2 into the turf in a terrible accident--the very same wreck that we saw at the beginning of every "Six Million Dollar Man" episode.

Steve Austin, who similarly crashes and is seriously injured, gets "enhanced" artificial limbs and an eye (although the eye really only functions as a camera; when this book was written, an actual "seeing" eye was WAY too farfetched), and he is enlisted by the government to perform special missions, including stealing a Russian MIG from a base in the Middle East.

Austin's problems with his new "freakish" nature and with his being used as a pawn of the government are quite realistically portrayed. Caidin delves much farther into the psychology of a "bionic" (which is actually a misnomer) man than the TV series ever did.

A very fun, fascinating, exciting read, if you can find it. One of my favorite books of all time.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Lieutenant - Colonel Steve Austin of the United States Air Force was a brilliant aviator and test pilot for NASA until the day he was savagely crippled during a test flight accident, in California. Barely alive, suffering from trauma, unable to use his legs, right arm, right eye and suffering from damaged organs and bones, Steve was ready to give up on life until he was proposed to undergo a top secret, government/military funded operation which would enable him to regain his lost capabilities. An operation which would make him better, stronger and faster than any man alive. He would be the 1st Bionic Man ever created, the perfect weapon for covert operations. I enjoyed reading this novel. I found it fast paced, exciting and interesting, especially on the scientific subjects such as Bionics and Cybernetics. It should provide for some good entertainment. This novel was the basis for the 70s tv series, " The Six Million Dollar Man ", which starred Lee Majors as Steve Austin.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very thoughtful reading, It is simple enjoyable. Interesting. Appealing. I bought it because I wanted to know if the plot was based upon to write that famous movie "the Six million Dollar Man," and it is, in fact. I found out that this kind of readings are simply awesome. It is a must have.
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Format: Hardcover
I didn't read it that long ago, actually, I somehow found it in a local library. I was very pleased of it's action, drama, and even suspense. I've read other books about "cyborgs" or whatever, and none of them even came close to the realism in this particular novel by Martin Caidin.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Cyborg was an interesting book especially for the time it was produced. What many readers might not know, or care, was that this book came out just a few years after the first "real" myoelectric arm was introduced. The "Boston Arm," was something I used for a science fair project my freshman year in high school a year before this book came out. Martin Caidin was not a doctor as some have chronicled but he was an aviation expert (most famous for his rebuilding of a JU-52 German Bomber from WWII "Iron Annie"). He also worked with the government on nuclear weapons safety. He has hundreds of books on aviation and dozens of Science Fiction books to his credit. My biggest problem with him as an author was that he started to sensationalize his science fiction towards the end of the career and no longer produced good hard fiction books, perhaps a reflection on the society he was now writing for, which preferred fantasy to science.

This book was powerful for its day in that it tried to use hard science, not fantasy science for most of its technology. This was a time when other authors (Michael Crichton comes to mind, with the Terminal Man), were talking about advanced (but plausible) science. The author knew what he was doing when he described "Steve" as an brilliant engineer, remember the astronauts of this time really were brilliant engineers and real pilots (not simply mission specialists). Would they have sent him out to play secret agent, probably not. However, for this time period this was about as realistic as it got. Nuclear power supplies, myoelectric prosthetics, all that was missing was the microprocessors of this era and this book could sell as well today as it did in the 70s.
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