Cycler and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Dust jacket in Has dustjacket condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Cycler Hardcover – August 26, 2008


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, August 26, 2008
$1.91 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Michael Vey 4
Featured New Release in Teen Science Fiction & Fantasy

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (August 26, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375851917
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375851919
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,200,281 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 9 Up—"I am all girl." That's the mantra that Jill desperately chants to herself whenever she feels the inevitable approaching—her body transforming into Jack. Four days a month, prior to menstruation, Jill's body mysteriously morphs into a male body, complete with sex organs. Despite countless hospital visits and hours of research, there is no explanation for this frightening phenomenon. In order to deal with the situation, the teen has developed a "Plan B," consisting of visualization techniques and chanting. Despite missing school and the necessity of giving noncommittal answers about her absences to her friend Ramie, Jill has ordinary teenage worries. Prom date issues are her prime concern, including garnering the attention of an elusive male student. Jill's situation grows treacherous when Jack rebels against the restraints placed upon him. The family has managed to keep him under control, but now he desires life outside the four walls of Jill's bedroom. His resentful attitude toward Jill causes significant upheaval and damage to her social life and causes a startling development in her friendship with Ramie. Themes of bisexuality, porn addiction, and gender identity make this best suited for mature readers. The writing is witty without being overly precious or self-conscious. The nonjudgmental attitude of some of the teen characters may not be entirely realistic, and the ending is abrupt and inconclusive. Still, Jill's real-life secondary concerns will ring true for many readers.—Jennifer Schultz, Fauquier County Public Library, Warrenton, VA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

For most of the month, Jill is a normal teenager who has best friends, Ramie and Daria; a crush, Tommy Knutson; and elaborate plans for wrangling an invitation to the prom. On four days during each month, though, Jill physically morphs into Jack, complete with the anatomy and fantasies of a 17-year-old boy. For three years, Jack has cooperated with his parents’ ultimatum of complete secrecy, but recently he has begun to slip out of the house to explore the neighborhood. Not everything is explained in this bizarre plot: Why is Jill/Jack’s dad banished to the basement, for example? McLaughlin handles each teen’s transformation with vivid, sexually explicit detail, and the discomfort the characters experience is well drawn, as are the supporting characters, including brazen Ramie and bisexual Tommy. This original, contemporary fantasy will circulate widely, leaving readers hoping that McLaughlin has many more such fresh, edgy books already in the editorial pipeline. Grades 9-12. --Frances Bradburn

More About the Author

Lauren McLaughlin grew up in the small town of Wenham, Massachusetts. After college, she spent ten years as a screenwriter and producer before abandoning her screen ambitions to write fiction full time. She lives in New York and London with her husband and daughter and is currently at work on her fourth novel. When not writing, Lauren can be found at the piano, in a dance studio, or in the kitchen inventing new desserts.

Customer Reviews

The characters were well developed and distinctly different.
Laura Herbertson
I think that there were too many twists and that things weren't fleshed out as much as it could have been.
Brandi Breathes Books
The book is a "must read" for those young adults who are questioning their persona.
Pitter Pat

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Pitter Pat on August 26, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I found Lauren McLaughlin's Cycler to be a truly enjoyable read. It will provide a challenge to the reader as it delves into gender and sexuality, topics that need to be probed if you are a teenager. The book is a "must read" for those young adults who are questioning their persona. The characters are funny, as are many of the situations they find themselves in.
Ms. McLaughlin is a quality storyteller, The book may invoke some controversy, but that is what makes it interesting. Young adults will relate to the characters. It is thought provoking. That makes it an enjoyable read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eric J. Juneau on April 22, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This one may have been the longest on my "to-read" list. All I knew was that it was about a girl who turns into a boy for five days every menstrual cycle. I was expecting a different story, one about girls versus boys. Differences between masculine and feminine. Today's societal issues. I thought it was going to offer some enlightenment and insight into how we treat each other based on gender. But this is more like a comic novel.

The girl is obsessed with prom. Right off the bat, I was disappointed. How shallow can you get, starting with a girl who has this gift that provides incredible perspective on a giant issue in high school. And all she cares about is the most asinine thing secondary education has to offer. I really couldn't tell you one more thing she's interested in besides prom.

And when she's a boy, they trap him/her in his/her room for five days, where he has his own fridge and porn. There is no plot in this story until halfway through, when the boy decides he's in love with his/her girl-ego's buxom best friend. Not to mention the unresolved storylines, like her family's dynamic with a mom and dad who are living separate lives in the same house. And that she doesn't tell her two best friends her secret until the very last line. Dude! That is not where you end your novel, that's where you end your first act!

There's a fantastic commentary locked in this story concept and it's wasted on petty YA junk like making plans for how to flirt with boys and shallow stereotypes and the importance of popularity. It focuses on what some Hollywood executive thinks are problems.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tam Nguyen on December 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
i picked up the book yesterday, thinking i was just gonna read this over the week, slowly. i ended finishing it in a day. i couldnt help but keep reading it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Laura Herbertson on November 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Once I started reading, I didn't put the book down. The characters were well developed and distinctly different. The story had personality. It reads like a young adult novel, but there are a few sex scenes. The sexiness really added to the story, because, after all, it IS a book about gender lines.

Clever, witty, well-written...definitely read this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Enchanting Reviews on October 30, 2008
Format: Hardcover
CYCLER
LAUREN McLAUGHLIN
Young Adult
Random House
ISBN# 978-0-375-85191-9
256 Pages
$17.99
Hardcover--Available Now

Rating: 5 Enchantments

CYCLER has a really intriguing premise that had me hooked from the jacket blurb. Four days out of every month Jill becomes Jack, in every single way possible. With the help of self hypnosis, Jill's been able to block out those four days, but Jack on the other hand, well he's been able to find a way to view Jill's days to keep up with what's happening in the world. Now he's no longer happy having to spend his four days cooped up in Jill's room. He wants out and he wants out for one reason: Ramie.

I loved this book. Aside from a really unique premise, Jill and Jack have their own voices that drew me straight in and made me like each of them almost instantly. Jack is your typical guy, except he only exists four days each month, but he's growing desperate to escape his prison, one that becomes even more solitary when Jill and her mother find out about Jack's first escape. Jill's your typical teenage girl, obsessed with prom and going with the guy of her dreams, who also just happens to have Jack to deal with. I loved how different Jack and Jill were, and how the black moment brought them together in one horrifying moment that actually had me cringing as I read the last few pages.

CYCLER has one of the best scenes I've ever read, when poor Jill in an effort to attract her crush goes to the ski hill with her best friend Ramie. What happens with her and the J-Bar is absolutely hysterical and mortifying.

Ms. McLaughlin creates a very vivid, at times hilarious page turner with CYCLER.
I was so glad to read in the author bio at the back of the book that Ms.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mark McLaughlin on September 28, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this book. While the subject matter might seem a little controversial, the story is surprisingly funny and sweet, and it moves along at a great pace. While Jill really is your average all-American girl and it's easy to root for her, I found Jack to be similarly endearing even though he's cast somewhat as her antagonist. One of the things I found most refreshing is the dialogue - or rather, the author's ability to make teens sound like teens, not what thirty-something writers often think teens sound like. Teenagers are at once ignorant and incredibly perceptive, and I think Ms. McLaughlin captures that perfectly.

This book strikes me as the type of story parents might want their teens and tweens to steer clear of - that is, until they read it themselves and see that you can tackle hot-button issues for kids - sexuality and self-identify - with grace and humor.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews