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Comment: 1998 Human Kinetics Pub. softcover. Great Condition! No writing or highlighting!
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Cycling Past 50 (Ageless Athlete) Paperback – April 21, 1998

79 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review


"This time the dean of human performance takes on the metamorphosis of aging along with the associated roller coaster ride of ills and thrills. Joe Friel's journey into aging explores the gamut of changes that affect us as cyclists. For some, Cycling Past 50 confirms the infinity of human physical potential. On a broader scale, it is our complete reference guide for personal exploration."
John Howard
3-time Olympic Cylist, 13-time U.S. national champion, Pan Am Games gold medalist, Ironman Triathlon world champion

"One of America's best cycling coaches shares his wisdom in a comprehensive book directed to the over 50-year-old. Senior riders will appreciate Joe devoting an entire book to them. Younger riders must read this book too-there's so much good information for riders of any age."
Arnie Baker, MD
5-time cycling national champion,
Elite cycling coach, author, and columnist

From the Publisher

"Joe Friel’s journey into aging explores the gamut of changes that affect us as cyclists. For some, Cycling Past 50 confirms the infinity of human physical potential. On a broader scale, it is our complete reference guide for personal exploration."

John Howard 3-time Olympic cyclist, 13-time U.S. national champion, Pan Am Games gold medalist, Ironman Triathlon world champion

"Senior riders will appreciate Joe devoting an entire book to them. Younger riders must read this book too—there’s so much good information for riders of any age."

Arnie Baker, MD 5-time cycling national champion, Elite cycling coach, author, and columnist

"Impressive . . . comprehensive, yet straightforward. Every cyclist and coach, whether young or old, beginner or professional, has something to learn from this book."

Mike Niederpruem, MS, CSCS Manager of Coaching Programs USA Cycling

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Best Books of the Month
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Product Details

  • Series: Ageless Athlete
  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Human Kinetics; 1 edition (April 21, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0880117370
  • ISBN-13: 978-0880117371
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #116,312 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

"Joe Friel has a masters degree in exercise science and has trained endurance athletes since 1980. His clients include elite amateur and professional road cyclists, mountain bikers, and triathletes and duathletes. His clients have included national champions, world championship competitors, and an Olympian.

He is the author of several training books and is a contributor to several magazines and websites around the world and offers clinics, seminars, and camps for athletes and coaches. He also consults with national sport federations and with businesses in the fitness industry. He is the cofounder of TrainingPeaks.com and TrainingBible Coaching.

As an age-group competitor, Joe has been a Colorado State Masters Triathlon champion, a Rocky Mountain region and Southwest region duathlon age-group champion, and a perennial USA Triathlon All-American duathlete. He also competes in bicycle races.

For information on coaching, speaking, or consulting services, contact him by email at jfriel@trainingbible.com or through his blog at www.joefrielsblog.com.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

155 of 156 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 14, 1998
Format: Paperback
While this book contains virtually the same information that is in Friel's The Cyclist's Training Bible, the focus on the older athelete makes the information more accessable and practical. Good reviews of current knowledge of cycling physiology, nutrition, and various training strategies for different types of cycling goals. Very good discussion of self evaluation of personal cycling strengths and weaknesses, along with guidance on how to set cycling goals, and develop abilties. Neither book is aimed at the casual cyclist, but rather those who want to develop and improve their skills. Where the Training Bible seems aimed at the elite athelete, Cycling Past Fifty provides reduced intensity trainig suggestions, and has more discusion on potential limitations, nad training problems. I highly recommend both books. Only four stars because of the poor title, and the level of repetition from The Cyclist's Training Bible.
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79 of 79 people found the following review helpful By K. Peffley on July 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
I've been a casual cyclist for over a year now, and I was looking for information that would explain in everyday language a strategy for improving my conditioning. This book hit the mark right on the head. I didn't want a detailed plan. I wanted to understand the concepts of training so that I could easily tailor them for myself, and this book provides just that. As mentioned in other reviews, this book is not just for those over 50. It could easily apply to anyone who wants to get more out of cycling, whether it be for long distance riding, touring, racing, whatever. I've known for a long time that working out in different heart-rate zones can improve conditioning and performance, but I've never known how to apply these ideas. Now I do, thanks to this book.
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64 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Silver on August 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
As a not-especially-athletic 50-something who rides to get in shape and lose a few pounds, I found the book a bit of a shock. Aimed at aging jocks, its main focus seems to be training for racing, centuries, and even LONGER rides! But once the shock wore off, I found a lot to help even me: ride often (3-4 times a week), vary the training regimen, and most of all -- learn how to use your heart rate meter. The book provides practical recipes for figuring out your "lactate threshold" (LT) heart rate (about 10% less than what my HRM calls my "maximum" heart rate) -- and then how to base your training program on time spent in various "zones" defined by percent of LT heart rate. It's helping!
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By cb on June 22, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a fit 51 year old that has worked out my entire life. Last year I did the Ride the Rockies, a grueling multi-day road bike tour through some of the most challenging terrain in Colorado. I followed the training recommended by tour and did fine, maybe in the top 30% of riders (passed 7 riders for every 3 that past me). A friend recommended this book which I used to modify my preparation for this year's ride... a much more difficult 535 mile ride with an average of 3,000 to 5,000 feet of climbing to do each of the 7 days. I had never followed a periodized training routine before, nor focused on several training techniques mentioned in the book like low heart rate training workouts to build pulmonary efficiency (or more accurately, low threshold workouts... read the book). In the months before the ride, my resting heart rate went from 62 to 48. The results during the ride were amazing. I blew past 99% of the riders and the same group of riders that did the ride with me last year, some on the same level some faster, could not even come close to keeping up with me. Everyone was asking what the heck I did. I pointed them all to this book which I followed closely. In fact, their is so much information in this book which includes other terrific advise on nutritional fueling, etc., that I read it a second time with pen and paper in hand.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Paul Mckenna on August 2, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Despite the title, cyclists of all ages will find this book useful. There is a great deal of both general discussion as well as specific recommendations for effective training. The sections which are age specific generally are of the form "If you were 20 you would train like this, since you are 50 you need to modify the training like this... (usually allow more recovery)". Thus the discussion becomes relevant for everyone.

Some will probably find the specifics more detail than they are interested in. Fine, take the bigger message (intensity + adequate recovery = ageless perfomance) and you will be way ahead of the game. The discussion of heart rate training is the best I have seen.

Again highly recommended for everyone.
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35 of 41 people found the following review helpful By GDH2 on May 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
Why "Train"?

I think improving my cycling will make it more enjoyable, so I've decided to experiment by following a training regimen. Last year I simply rode my bike as often, fast, and far as possible. I did get faster and able to ride longer, but it plateaued. The logic is obvious - specific steps designed by very, very experienced people for a specific goal are more likely to achieve that goal than random effort. Will it be too much or a PITA? Time will tell.
My First 12 Months

From past experience I knew I needed some days to rest, so I started off mostly following a riding one day with a rest or gym day - I had started my "get back into shape" effort by joining a gym two months before I started riding. I also joined two cycling clubs in my first month cycling, the Charles River Wheelmen and Nashoba Valley Pedalers and discovered that they had rides every week on weekends, most of which had very well-designed routes. Immediately I started doing club rides every Saturday and Sunday - scratch the ride/rest idea. After two months of riding, I added Wednesday Wheelers, a group within CRW. Then I had regular rides on Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday every week. Most of these club rides had options for two or three routes of different length. Naturally [in my mind, anyway], I would always opt for the longest ride option. Add in a couple of solo rides and there weren't many rest days in the week. By the end of six months, I was riding 5-6 days a week.

Find a Plan

The two most prolific authors on training for cycling seem to be Joe Friel and Chris Carmichael. Shortly after I started riding I read Friel's The Cyclist's Training Bible (skimmed), Cycling Past 50, and Carmichael's The Time-Crunched Cyclist.
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