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92 of 94 people found the following review helpful
on September 19, 2010
I've been looking for something like this for a long time, something to carry in my laptop bag when I travel and something to carry in my IT toolkit.

This device has 3 operational modes with different uses. I wouldn't recommend this device unless you need to switch between these modes with the same device, but that feature has good uses.

There is a Client mode. This will allow you to join the device to a wireless network, and bridge it to the ethernet port. This means you can connect a wired device to a wireless network. The downside to this mode is that one must first manually configure an IP address in the subnet of the Dlink default IP (192.168.1.50) so one can get to the configuration, then reset their IP back to dynamic or an IP in the wireless network you're connecting to.

This is useful for when someone moves a wired only computer or printer where there isn't a wire yet, and you need to just get it working for a while until the cabling happens or a more permanant device is ordered. You can also use it to connect your Xbox over at a friend's house. They may have wireless, you may have wired like in my case. Just configure it for their network and plug it into your xbox and bring it over. There's other potential uses for this mode too.

There is a Router mode. This will let you share an internet connection on the wired port with wireless devices. This puts them behind a NAT router as well, with all the usual settings. This is the easiest to setup and understand, just like your typical router but missing wired ports. You can get in on the default dlink wireless network, go to the default IP (192.168.1.50) and then change any settings, setup security, setup a static WAN address etc.

This is useful for when you want to share a dsl modem with a group of laptops, or join a laptop to a wired network but have it behind the NAT firewall, isolating it from incoming access from that network. I really won't use this option much, but as an IT guy, it's helpful to have in my laptop bag a spare router that could be setup for wireless clients in a pinch.

There is a Access Point mode. This will let you bridge a wired network into a wireless network. This bypasses any firewall/router and will share the wired network's DHCP and all that. This works out of the box with no configuration, but I'd recommend connecting to the wired port with a static ip to connect to the 192.168.1.50 and changing the name/setting up security. You don't want to have rogue access points allowing people unsecured access to your wired network usually, even temporarily.

This is the most useful mode for me. You can use this at locations that don't have a wireless. Just plug it in, and then you can connect your laptop and roam around without having to cable your laptop in. You can connect multiple devices as well. This is good for taking a hotel with a poor or no wireless connection but a wired one, and still using your iPhone/Android wifi for example. Most of my clients don't use wireless on the corporate lan, so I can use this to jack in and use my tablet without dragging the cord around.

It comes with a nice zipper case for cables, AC adapter and the device, though it is slightly larger than it needs to be.

It has a USB cord to power the device off the laptop instead of the AC adapter, but it seems like the range is reduced in this mode.

The range isn't as good as a larger wireless N device with larger antenna (internal or external)

There is no antenna jack for an external antenna.

There is a USB port to share with the Shareport utility or use a 3G modem with it, only in router mode.

Each mode switch has it's own config, passwords, defaults and so on. I suggest using a labelmaker to record the important settings on the device for each switch mode if they are changed.

It supports WPS and has a WPS button even, but I didn't test that since I dislike automagic wizards.

The only way I can imagine this being improved is the external antenna jack, a second LAN port for LAN router mode and maybe a battery (ala mifi devices) to run for a few hours without having to find a power cord.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on April 26, 2011
I used this Link when I travel to be able to connect my Ipad in hotels without WiFi. The setup was easy, I just plugged it in. Tried it in several hotels around China, it worked EVERYTIME!
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2011
Bought a couple of these a few months ago for use on work computers that were Ethernet capable only...problem is that most hotels are wireless only. In bridge/adapter mode, these convert the wireless signal to Ethernet and problem was solved. Also use it to connect my satellite TV receiver to my wireless network for ordering movies vice running cables across the room...3 position switch makes it easy to switch modes and share an internet connection with others.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 17, 2011
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
In this day and age, most hotels and motels offer free Wi-Fi in the room and in the lobby. But there are still some that just have an Ethernet cable sticking out of the wall and do not have Wi-Fi signal in the guest rooms.

This pocket router can convert a wired connection to wireless (This adding Wi-Fi/wireless to an existing wired network is called the Access Point Mode), so that I can use all my wireless gadgets in my room. I can add encryption (use WPA or WPA2 for better security) to the Wi-Fi signal, so it is actually better than the open Wi-Fi signal offered by hotels. The Access Point Mode is the configuration in which most people will use.

The Wireless Client Mode does the reverse. It converts a wireless signal to a wired connection. Older computers and many game consoles do not have wireless capability. In an area where you only have wireless signal but no Ethernet (wired) network, you can use this pocket router to grab the wireless signal, convert it, then send it through the router's Ethernet port to your device. An example would be using an old Sony PS3 to play online games in a hotel room that has only Wi-Fi but no Ethernet cable.

The Router Mode is less useful for an end user, because in most situations, there is already a router in an existing network, and therefore there is no need to add another one.

I have only used this DLink in the Access Point Mode and it is fast and safe.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on March 16, 2012
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I am using the DAP1350 with a MacBook Air, so I don't even have a disk drive, but the included software is for Windows anyway. No problems there; I didn't need it. So this unit is fine to use with a Mac.

I did do something wrong the first time I tried to setup the router... all was fine -- the wireless was working! -- until I went to add a password for accessing the network, and then, once the password was set, I could not login to the network myself. And I couldn't figure out how to reset the router. There is 24/7 tech support, but I decided to try the website first.

Tips:
1. The reset button -- to restore factory settings, is on the bottom. The base rotates 90 degrees to act as a stand, and you need a paperclip-type object to poke into the little hole and hold for 10 seconds to reset.
2. I grabbed a copy of the DAP-1350 user's manual, which it turns out I prefer to the quickstart page that comes in the box. Among other things, I was having a hard time reading some of the printed quickstart page.

In my second attempt (after the restore), I went to the router mode setup section, and used the setup wizard, as I had before. Again, getting the wireless to work was straightforward.

To set the password for accessing the network (note that this is different from the password to administer the router, though of course you could use the same password if you really wanted to), I went to WIRELESS SETTINGS on the left sidebar and used the wireless network setup wizard. I manually assigned a network key, so that I could specify my own password (easier to remember), and checked the box for WPA encryption. Anyway, with those choices, the setup worked fine. (When I didn't specify WPA encryption, it did not, but who knows if I might have done something else wrong.)

Anyway, now it's all setup and I am wireless! I am using this just for my home network, though of course the great thing about this little unit is that you can so easily travel with it.

Heads up: This is not also a wired router. So it's probably not actually the best thing for a regular home router. E.g., my other router is connected to the Xbox and Roku via ethernet cables, and you can't do that with this. It's wireless only.

There are also two other configurations possible with this unit. You can use it with a computer that does not have wireless to pick up a wireless network for your computer, via USB. And you can also use it in access point mode.

Although I stumbled at first, I think this is a great little unit, and I'm pleased to have it.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on August 4, 2011
Setting up personal networks baffle me; By now I expect something to be basically plug it in and away you go. If I buy it and it isn't it goes back to the store. Forget the toll free number. Forget the call a friend. Forget the service guy. For 60 some bucks it works or it doesn't.

So enter the D-Link DAP-1350. D-Link never says 'easy' on the box but I needed a solution for the office so I bought it. The unit is small yes BUT when combined with the external power supply it is a pouch of proportion - not epic proportion but proportion.

I use a wired network at the office. However I wanted something to tap into that network and provide a secure wireless access point for my smartphone and tablet. The DAP-1350 has three modes - router, access point and something else I will not use in my lifetime - so I haven't bothered with it. I found the three modes confusing so I watched a YouTube presentation on the device which clarified things immensely. I toggled the DAP-1350 to the Access Point position and lit it up. My laptop saw it instantly and Windows 7 asked if I wanted to establish a secure network. I clicked absolutely - it asked me for a name, then I was asked to enter a WPS PIN number for security and I was up and running securely. Amazing. It also shot a code (not the PIN) at me to connect wireless devices to the network.

When I travel I will flick the switch to Router and use it for wireless connectivity when there is only in-room wired Ethernet.

I looked at routers where you can plug a 3G fob into them and you are wireless via a cell phone connection but this type of connection is expensive and I have found unreliable especially in South America.

All in all the DAP-1350 is perfect for my uses and is a fine addition to my travel bag.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful
I've owned nearly a half dozen of these little D-Link routers because they are so useful for taking to hotels--since many hotels (especially in Europe) are charging per device it's nice to have a router to make all my gadgets appear as one so I only have to pay for Internet access once. Plus I get encrypted wifi and don't have to share the wireless bandwidth with all the other hotel guests.

But every one I've owned has failed after about 6 months. Eventually I just can't get a wifi connection. Wired connections work fine, and the lights work. I can reset the device to default, but once it fails I can't keep a solid connection. Strangely with one of my devices switching to Access Point mode helped, but even that eventually quit.

So I am resigned to having to carry larger routers or just deal with hotel wifi.

To bad, I have always been rooting for these devices and giving up on them is a very sad deal to me, but after going 0-5 on the devices I have to admit there's something seriously wrong with them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 22, 2011
I struggled for two hours to get this working in Wireless Client mode under Windows 7 and Linux, and ultimately the problem was the horrible documentation. Had it told me how to configure my machine *after* configuring the 1350, I could have had this up and running in a few minutes. The administration interface is incredibly confusing, despite the fact that I'm in IT and have configured networks for years.

The documentation tells you to configure the DLink from a web browser after configuring your machine to a particular IP address. This is strange, and the web interface is very unclear and poorly done, but this part went OK. The problem was that it doesn't tell you that you have to reset your machine's network configuration back to the way you would normally configure it for your network---the documentation ends after you've configured the router and never tells you what to do afterward. There are many ways to connect to a network through an intermediate point, and nowhere does it tell you how the DLink 1350 works! Worse, when it's configured correctly, you can't access the DLink's admin interface any longer! I kept thinking it had locked up and reset it 10 or 15 times---it turns out this was what it's supposed to do!

The device itself seems to work ok now, and it's a pretty cool idea. To make this a decent product, they need to 1) write complete documentation, 2) have it translated properly into English and 3) write a better administrative interface.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on August 12, 2011
I purchased this router because I had a previous "G" class D-Link travel router and it worked fairly well. I wanted the range available with "N" class routers. This one did not disappoint. It works great and services several devices at the same time. I've tested it at home, replacing my home router. I have 3 PCs, 2 iPhones, and an iPad. This router handles all of them at the same time and has range nearly as good as most full size home routers.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon October 28, 2011
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I've had one of these since the first pocket version was released and sold for over $200. I've used it for years and it's been something I've been really happy to have. Not only is it useful in hotel rooms where I've got devices that need wireless, it's been helpful at various consulting gigs and client sites. It's also been handy for use at home when other equipment failed.

D-Link makes this router in a nice carrying case; it is easy to throw in an equipment bag or suitcase.

This new N version offers a nice upgrade. It can be used as always as a wireless router (which can give you several wireless connections off one connection in a hotel room). It can be used as a wireless access point, and the new very handy upgrade is the ability to bridge from a wireless to a wired network. This means you can connect something like a game machine with no wireless to a wireless network. Or, in a hotel with wireless only, you can connect the wireless back to a hub. Or, if you have a 3G or 4G card you can use it to bridge your home network if your ISP goes down.

This is one of my favorite and most used gadgets.
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