Customer Reviews

1,862
3.5 out of 5 stars
D-Link Wireless Day/Night Network Surveillance Camera with mydlink-Enabled (DCS-932L)
Style Name: Day/NightPackage Type: Standard PackagingChange
Price:$46.95 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

714 of 719 people found the following review helpful
on June 30, 2013
I purchased this camera after a string of home invasions on our street. I placed it near our back door and configured it to email images when it detected motion. After a week or so I awoke to several high quality images of an uninvited person at our back door at 3:30am. The police were impressed with the images. They used identifying features such as tattoos and facial images to identify and arrest the person.

I have been very impressed with the camera and have recommended it to several others.
review image
1919 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
448 of 481 people found the following review helpful
on April 5, 2011
4/4/2011: The day and night video is pretty good. The installation process was flawless. Unfortunately I can't use the camera as a baby monitor since the audio static is awful. The static is so loud you can't hear anything. Hopefully Dlink will address my concern. I'll update my review once I hear back from them. See my video if you'd like to hear the bad static. Also Dlink hasn't fixed the audio problem with the Iphone App. You only get video with the Iphone. I have the Iphone 4 with iOS 4.3 installed.

4/5/2011: I contacted Dlink support. They said they know about the audio problem and they don't plan to fix it. Ughh! I'm going to return this one and see if a new one sounds better. I'll post more once I get the new one.

4/14/2011: I received my new DCS-932L from Amazon today. The audio is just as bad with this camera. What a shame. I even upgraded my java version to 1.6.0_24-b07. Ughh. Time to send it back or pray for a firmware fix.

8/31/2011: We've started to use this camera all the time since our baby is older and Iphone support has been added. The audio is good enough where we can hear him. I just wish Dlink would get rid of the static.

3/5/2012: This camera has become our primary baby monitor for our 14th month old. The iphone apps work very well. Our Philips Iphone dock works great with the Dlink Iphone app. It amplifies the audio and cleans up the audio a bit. I'm adding 1 more star back. I still wish the the audio didn't have so much static, but this camera has turned out to be a great baby monitor.

3/12/2015: We have six of these monitors and two children now. Both kids survived just fine with us using these cameras. We now use these cameras to keep an ear on the kids when they are playing alone in the basement or in a remote part of the house. We have found that these cameras work really well using a Netgear Nighthawk R7000. We've tried many routers and the Netgear works the best. The Dlink Iphone app and Ipad app has been very stable over the past few years. We've taken this camera on vacation with us and gotten it to work on a wired connection in hotel rooms and condos.
review image review image review image review image review image
3232 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
187 of 202 people found the following review helpful
This is a decent camera that will work well if you want a simple plug-and-play webcam for monitoring purposes. Setup is a challenge, though, if you decide to configure and run the camera manually, rather than using D-Link's software and portal. (If you want to manage the video without using D-Link's portal, I've included instructions at the end of this review.)

Positives:
+ Good looking, fairly unobtrusive camera with a nicely designed ball-and-socket mount that can be set on a table or mounted permanently on a wall.
+ Video quality is fine for room monitoring at the default configuration (320x240 pixels) and quality can be improved four-fold by resetting the video to VGA (640x480 pixels). This isn't the same quality as an HD cam, so I wouldn't use this camera for Skyping, but it's fine for a room monitor.
+ The DLink web service makes it simple to view the video feed from an internet connection when you're away from home, if you choose to use their portal.
+ If your router supports WPS Setup, setting up the wireless connection is as easy as pressing a couple of buttons.

Negatives:
- If you don't want to use DLink's web portal for remote monitoring, setting up the camera manually requires a fair amount of technical knowledge. I didn't like the idea of having DLink manage my video feed, so I went for the manual setup approach. Unfortunately, there is no documentation for doing this, so you need to be comfortable configuring network devices. Basically, DLink assumes you'll use their service if you want remote access.
- If you don't need remote access (e.g., if you're using this as a baby monitor), things are a bit easier, but not trivial. You'll need to manually hunt for the camera's IP address on your subnet, login, and manually configure the camera. Once I figured out the IP and login name and password (which aren't in the setup guide), configuring the device for use at home was pretty straightforward.
- If your router doesn't support WPS, getting the wireless connection established is a challenge. You have to connect the camera to the router with a Cat5 patch cable, search manually for the IP, login (again, the manual doesn't give default login credentials), and manually set up the wireless connection.

In a nutshell, this is a decent camera, and if you want to use DLink's software for configuring the camera and their portal for monitoring the video feed, it's a good, simple choice. But DLink assumes you'll use their approach, and if you want to set up and use the device without using their software (which I didn't want to install on my laptop because it's a work computer) or portal (which I didn't want to use because I didn't like the idea of DLink managing my webcam feed) then you need to have technical knowledge and be willing to spend some time, without the benefit of instructions.

UPDATE: I finally managed to configure this camera manually and have it set up for monitoring from outside my network without using DLink's portal. If you decide you want to do the same, here's how:

- Connect the camera to your network with a Cat5 patch cable. Using a browser on any PC on the network, search for the camera (you can use a utility to find connected devices, or just start entering IP addresses on your subnet until you get a hit).

- Once you get a response from the camera, go to the setup tab then to wireless setup and enter the SSID and pre-shared key for your router so that you won't have to keep the camera connected with the Cat5 cable.

- Then go to the network setup and enter a static IP address, enter your router's IP (the one on your subnet, not the external IP) into the default gateway field, and enter a port number other than 80 into the HTTP port field (80 is the default but many ISPs block port 80).

- Next, log in to your router and set up port forwarding to forward activity on the port you set in the last step to the static IP address you entered in the last step.

- To access the camera from outside your network, fire up a browser and enter your router's external IP address followed by a colon and the port number. If you have a dynamic IP address from your ISP, you can use a service like DynDNS.org to get a common name keeps up with your ever-changing IP address. You can also download a free/cheap livecam app on your iPad or iPhone that lets you monitor the video feed remotely.

Important: You'll only need these instructions if you want to configure your DLink cam manually and want to monitor it directly without using DLink's portal. The easier approach (by far) is to use the CD that comes with the camera, load and run DLink's setup software to configure the camera, and use their portal for monitoring. But I didn't want to use their software or portal (I try not to load lots of potentially buggy software onto my computer, and I don't trust D-Link's security enough to have them managing my webcam feed), so I took the time to figure out the manual approach. I hope these instructions are useful to anyone else who wants to do the same.
1717 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
45 of 46 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon June 28, 2012
**** Updated - See latest comment at the bottom of this review *****

I live in an apartment in a fairly secure neighborhood, but it would seem with the economic downturn, there are more thefts then usual these days. So I decided to start building a security system. I must say, after shopping around for several months for security systems and services, this by far is the best and easiest way to go! My home is all about the internet, so, the decision to go with the wireless N camera was a good choice. This camera was incredibly easy to set up with the software provided. While I am a network head, I didn't need to use any brain power at all to get this camera up and running. The most difficult thing is finding the right place to put the camera! Once installed, I searched the D-LINK website for the Security Software so that I can record and playback video from my camera on my PC, even set it up to only record when there is motion in front of the camera! Also, it seems easy to add additional cameras for other areas like the garage, entry way, and more! Further, I can check on my apartment with video and audio from my Kindle Fire with the D-link app! So, while I am away, I can check on my place! Also, I can also go to D-Link's website from any other computer and log in and check that way too ... amazing, and my only initial cost was the camera!

The only complaint I have is that the power cord from the wall plug to the camera is only 4 feet long. So, that means splicing in another wire to get more length to get the camera high enough so its out of the way. Being an electrician, that's simple, but for others it might not be. The only other choice would be to mount the camera lower, about halfway up the wall.

This was a very good decision and a great way to build up my own security system over time. Best of all, its professional, and wireless - Living in an apartment never got better!

***** this is an update below ******

The camera has been working so well, I actually purchased a refurb one from Amazon, and it also worked awesome, and I saved a ton. For those that are interested, I also have these camera email me when there is motion. Since I use HOTMAIL, I thought I would post the configuration for them ....

Dlink Security Camera - DCS-932L

The camera works with security software from DLINK, but the camera can also email images when there is an even, such as motion. This is particularly useful when you only have email access and want to check up on your house, or whatever our camera is watching.

Dlink Local Camera Login

Setup>Email

SMTP Server Address: smtp.live.com
SMTP Server Port: 587 (default of 25 will not work)
Sender E-mail Address: ** your email@hotmail.com address **
Receiver E-mail Address: ** your email@hotmail.com address **
User Name: ** your email@hotmail.com address **
Password: ** Your email access password **

Use SSL-TLS/STARTTLS (No) SSL-TLS (NO - blank) STARTTLS (YES)

***** Update 1/15/2014 *****

I am now up to four cameras after I purchased a condo and moved out of the apartment. I still very much like the items. They are fairly simply to install. I used to use the full recording software on my PC, but I have since found that letting the cameras email when there is motion is simpler and just as effective. Further, I have installed battery back up power supplies on all cameras so that if the power goes out, the cameras can still record and email me. Also, here in Idaho, its gets really cold, and that doesn't seem to affect one camera which I placed under an eve out of the rain overlooking my front door. Also, I wanted to mention that the camera actually caught someone trying to break into my home about 2 months ago. The would be burglar gave up when he attempted to enter and noticed by dead bolt locks, but I got some awesome images of him and have forwarded them to the local police which might be helpful in other neighborhood break-ins. The only complain I have is that it would be nice if there was an extension for the power cord available from D-Link. I did wire my own low voltage power cord extension using speaker wire here on Amazon, but an nice clean extension, from D Link, would not only be profitable for them, but easier for those that don't have wiring experience. Also, there are occasional issues with ActiveX and Java, which are 3rd Party software add ons that are required by D Link to make these cameras 100% functional. There are work arounds, but again, for those not versed in software work arounds it would be nice to use another platform rather than rely on these other companys. But even with those small issues, this is by far one of the best purchases I have ever had on Amazon.
review image
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
57 of 60 people found the following review helpful
on March 30, 2013
I own four of these cameras and two DropCam HDs. The two are very different, but for my purposes, the D-Link cameras are actually more useful.

Connectivity: Both offer 802.11N 2.4GHz connectivity, which is fine except when there are many networks nearby and frequency congestion becomes a problem; 5 GHz would be much better, but isn't offered. Neither camera streams effectively with a weak signal. The DCS-942L can capture to the SD card, which is good to have if the signal is iffy. The DCS-942L also has a wired ethernet port. For your sanity, use wired ethernet if at all possible. (With Dropcam you have no choice but to use wireless.)

Optics: The DCS-942L is VGA quality only, not 720p. But the lens on the Dropcam is wider angle, so the level of detail on objects is the same--the Dropcam simply shows more of the room. For a camera pointed directly at a door or hallway, it won't really matter. The bigger improvement comes from 1080p cameras such as the DCS-2230 which I also own.

Night vision: The DCS-942L has much better night vision than the DropCam. The DCS-942L has four LEDs that glow rather noticeably; DropCam HD has several (maybe ten) behind tinted plastic that is more stealthy but blocks a lot of the light. Consequently, DropCam HD's night vision in mediocre, while the DCS-942L has good night vision for indoors.

Live viewing: I use a Mac and an Airport Express router which does not support UPNP for on-the-fly port mapping. Therefore the MyDlink service will not stream video above 320x240 because it is relayed through the MyDlink website first. I find MyDlink kind of useless and just use the camera's built-in Web server for control. Dropcam streams continuously to their cloud service and does not depend on any special configuration for your router. They use Flash video for playback.

Playback: Dropcam shows the entire recorded video, either 7 days or 30 days, on a timeline view, which makes it really easy and fast to navigate. If you receive a motion alert via e-mail, you click the link in the e-mail to go straight to the video when the motion occurred. The DCS-942L will e-mail you up to a 10-second video file, between 200K-2MB depending on settings and degree of motion, and you have to then go to the mydlink.com web site, access the camera's Web server directly, or go to your NAS if you have one to get the full-length video. However, because my DCS-942L's are set to record on motion, they have clips on the SD cards from as long as three months ago. (The D-link cameras automatically throw away old video clips to make room as needed.)

Motion detection: The D-Link camera offers very flexible video motion detection where you can draw a specific region in the picture to capture movement. There are firmware issues in the D-Link when using highly irregular regions shapes, so keep the motion regions simple and rectangular. Both D-Link and DropCam HD, but especially the DCS-942L, have some trouble in very low lighting conditions, such as late afternoon indoors, and false trigger on video motion. On the DCS-942L, I had to set the sensitivity to 30-35% to stop it, but then the camera wouldn't detect any motion at all! For best results, use a normally bright region of the picture for the motion detection. Dropcam's video motion has no sensitivity or region adjustment but works pretty well, false triggering once or twice per day in early morning and evening. Unlike DropCam HD, the DCS-942L offers passive infrared (PIR) motion detection using a separate, dedicated infrared detector on the front of the camera. On the Medium or Low settings, it triggers reliably with ZERO observed false positives in my experience. High sensitivity will false trigger in very cold weather. PIR does not work through windows. Neither camera has I/O ports for connecting external sensors.

Long-term cost: Once you buy the D-Link camera, it's yours. You record to an SD card or to a NAS on your network as your DVR. There are third-party services that stream 24/7 from the D-Link cameras to provide offsite DVR also. To do any recording with DropCam, you have to pay monthly fees that, for the 30-day plan, exceed the cost of the camera in about a year. You also need to upgrade your cable service if you have more than one or two Dropcams. With DropCam, you pay for simplicity and convenience at the expense of configurability.

Scalability: Local recording means no bandwidth usage on your home Internet connection unless you are watching a live feed from outside your network, whereas the Dropcams use bandwidth 24/7. You can record continuously to files on an SD card (each file up to 6 minutes) for weeks at a time, and the camera rotates the oldest recordings out automatically. If you're technically inclined, you could set up a Linux box with ZoneMinder and add other types of cameras to the mix later, whereas Dropcam doesn't offer that possibility. Dropcam scales poorly because the Internet connectivity must support constant streaming from all cameras. I had trouble with WiFi performance and video stream stutter with both types of cameras when I had multiple streams running from any sort of distance. If you can do so, run Ethernet to the cameras. For just one or two you should be fine with wireless.

Support: I haven't needed Dropcam support yet because the product is pretty solid. The D-Link e-mail support is laughable and reminds me of the old DOS days when the solution to all problems was to reboot. If you find a firmware bug (I've found several), they just tell you to reset everything to factory defaults and try again. Once you do that, and find the bug again, you just have to cross your fingers that they fix it.

Summary: If you are not technically inclined, it's hard to beat the ease of setup of the Dropcam HD. It just works with no fooling around and has a great web-based interface. If you are willing to tinker with the sittings directly through the onboard Web server, the D-Link cameras have more flexibility and no recurring cost.

After living with my setup for over a year, I suggest setting up a micro recording server or NAS for centralized control. Beyond a few cameras it starts to get really cumbersome to have each camera mapped out through the router on its own port with its own SD storage. Also, if you have the cameras in your home and don't want to be bombarded with clips of yourself constantly, you'll find yourself unplugging the cameras and having to plug them back in. A centrally-managed setup with multiple profile such as Blue Iris would be less irritating.

If you are willing to forego on-camera SD card storage, there are many IP cameras such as the ones from Dahua with much better image quality and night vision for not much more money. For stand-alone use of one or two, they're a decent value.

The attached 10-second video is the longest that the camera will send via e-mail when it detects motion. It will simultaneously record up to 1 minute to the SD card, or record to the SD card 24/7.
review image review image
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
255 of 288 people found the following review helpful
on May 26, 2011
I was looking for a low cost wireless camera with better image quality than the Linksys WVC80N cameras that I have been using for a while. Side-by-Side, this is how the cameras compared.

Bottom Line: Unless you need Night Vision or need the mobil phone apps, the Linksys WVC80N performs better at a lower price. Linksys has better image quality than D-Link at any distance, handles outdoor scenes when the D-Link won't and will deliver video clips (not just snapshots) by email or ftp. The Linksys does not have phone-apps, but it can email a 5 second motion triggered video clip that can be viewed on your android phone.

Best Useage: The D-Link would be great as a baby cam or pet cam. The cute design, better audio and the night vision outperform the Linksys for these uses.

The Linksys WVC80N would be better for any other use where the video quality under all lighting conditions (except dark) is the highest priority.

Compare Image Quality @ 640x480
1. Color Quality - D-Link is a little better than Linksys, unless it is an outdoor view. The D-Link exposure control cannot manage any sunlit surfaces. Even grass and trees are completely washed out to white if they are in direct sun. There are no settings to fix this. In moderate light, the D-Link color is better than Linksys because the Linksys has a color hue gradient of red in the center to green at the perimeter. This color balance problem is distracting when viewing a white scene like snow or other very light backgrounds.

2. Image Clarity - With the two cameras side-by-side with the same scene of near-and-distant objects, the D-Link by comparison looks optically out-of-focus, though neither camera is great in this respect. If you want to recognize a face at a distance Linksys is better. The D-Link video clarity is fine for a baby's bedroom, because a near-field view does not demand the same sharp focus as a distant view.

3. Sound Quality - The D-Link has good audio performance on an wireless "N" lan when accesses directly within your home using the camera's local IP address. Very little "noise", no skipping or break-up and good microphone pickup. I didn't check it out across the internet or with the "MyDlink" connection, but I am guessing audio would not perform so well there . . as other reviewers have noted.

The Linksys has more audio artifacts and is more vulnerable to the audio breaking up when the video settings are too demanding even on the local network. Across the internet with high speed cable service at both ends, the Video has to be set at "Low Quality" and 2 or 1 frames per second for the audio to work without breaking up.

Some Feature Comparisons
1. The one obvious advantage with the D-Link is the night vision. It works pretty well up to 20 feet but the pictures are very soft-focus. For your night-time application you may want to consider that the 4 red LEDS are very bright and draw your eye to the camera.

2. The D-Link camera cannot stream video to a PC without using the full web management interface or using the MyDLink web service. With the Lynksys you can play the video stream directly on an iPad or on a PC using Google's Chrome browser without the surroundings of a web interface. Internet Explorer will only show 1 frame of a video stream if you bypass the full management interface explaining why Google Chrome is mentioned. With the Linksys camera, Right-Click on the video in the normal interface to get the URL for the direct video stream to used on your iPad or Chrome.

The D-Link can display a single .jpeg snapshot without the managment interface. This feature can be enabled in the camera's web interface and it tells the address format to use. This is for direct access, not using MyDink.

2. The D-Link cannot upload a video clip to an ftp server when it sees motion. It will only upload a single .jpeg snapshot. This will often give you a useless premature snapshot of a shadow but not the person, or a door opening but not the person. With the Linksys .mjpeg video clip, no video compression is used so each frame is a good .jpeg snapshot. You can select the best frame from the 5 second video that would give you the best view of the motion event that triggered the clip.

3. The D-Link will only email 6 frames when it sees motion. You can choose 1 or 2 frames per second. It will include the 3 frames it had buffered before it saw motion which is a good feature. This makes the email feature much more usefull than the D-Link ftp upload of a single .jpeg snapshot.

For motion detection features, you may prefer the Linksys which will email, ftp (or both) a 5 second video clip at a normal video frame rate.

I had no reason to examine the motion detect performance on the D-Link camera, but the motion detection on this Linksys camera works much better that on the prior similar models. With careful detection-area and sensitivity tuning, motion detection works great. Motion Detection responds to shadows which makes outdoor use tricky but manageable. Shadows on the ground caused by wind blowing the trees will trigger the camera so your detction areas need to be carefully targeted at areas of interest.

Setup / Wireless Compatibility
Working in a related tech business, I believe the negative reviews on either of these products regarding wireless compatibility or networking issues are the result of bad programming on the manufacturer's setup CD or the buyer's lack of network troubleshooting experience. If you have a friend who is very tech-savy to help you get past wireless and networking complications, either of these products will work reliably on virtually any wireless network. Sometimes the installation CD's will simplify networking issues and sometime they won't.

Reading the complaints on Amazon about the D-Link setup, I had the same problems but they were caused by poor programming on Setup CD; not the camera. If you get failure messages going through the Wizard on the CD, just use the web interface on the camera and save yourself a lot of grief. The web interface on the camera is excellent.

Another reason to skip the DLink CD . . . it forces you to to create a MyDlink account with DLink even though you may have no need for the service because you prefer to port-forward to this camera.

I returned this camera because it was a video quality downgrade from the Linksys cameras already in service.
88 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
95 of 106 people found the following review helpful
on December 25, 2011
Searched the web looking for a camera and reading all the reviews and seeing all of the horror stories I was certain I would be disappointed with my purchase. I was pleasantly surprised with this DCS 942L.

I placed this camera in my window pane pointing towards the front lawn. The picture is awesome, the motion sensor is awesome up to 50 feet (confirmed with my wife and a tape measure)

I tested it inside the house and it is awesome. The picture quality is scary. This is a great baby or pet monitor.

I wish D-Link made an affordable outdoor camera, I would purchase it too.

Pros:
1. Easy to set up. My wife and I set this one up in about 20 minutes.
2. Truth is I did have to call customer service to get the password for the advanced settings on the mydlink site. FYI admin is your username and the password is the same password you use to set up your camera on the mydlink site.
3. The mydlink site is intuitive. I have minimal to basic computer skills, and I was able to navigate it comfortably.
4. Viewing your camera from anywhere there is an Internet connection is awesome.
5. You can set the camera up to send you emails when the camera senses motion.
6. The camera can take 10 pics and a 10 second avi each time it senses motion in an area you select.

Con:

1. The arm to adjust the camera is plastic and flimsy. You want it to lock it in but it is just to cheap.

That is it for cons for me. For $150 bucks I was not expecting a HD camera. I just want video proof of who is in my yard, maybe even catch the dog in the act and show its owner the proof.
66 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
222 of 266 people found the following review helpful
on December 8, 2012
One of the reason I purchased this security camera is that it has MicroSD slot where it can save the video directly rather than saving it on the computer or transferring to FTP server, so I don't have to keep running my computer 24/7. That's what I thought. Here's why I'm so disappointed and giving only 1 star.

The motion detection is working. Good.
Night vision is working. Good.
It does save videos to MicroSD card. Good.

But!... One day there was a burglary and I started checking the recorded video. In one of the video I saw thief's feet moving top left corner in the video. Then when he is about to move to the center so I can see his face, then video abruptly ended. I was so mad, I can't even explain how mad I was! That's all this security camera recorded. Thief's legs!!

Their recording function has big big problems.
1. It records only MAXIMUM duration of 10 seconds at a time. It does NOT record whole scene while motion is detected.
2. After 1 recording session, it waits MINIMUM of 60 seconds until it starts recording again if there's any motion detected.

So this camera started recording because it saw legs moving, but it decided to stop recording because it can record only 10 seconds! And it decided to ignore everything happened in front of the camera afterwards because it needs 60 seconds break.

I do not understand these restrictions because I'm saving the file directly to MicroSD, not to FTP nor sending it over email. There is no wireless issues or bandwidth issues worry about. They cannot call this "Security" camera.
77 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on December 11, 2014
I'm very ecstatic my camera came and then highly disappointed my camera refuses to sink with the hardware from the website no camera pops up n the mic light in front does not light up ....... I really need help from anyone who can help trouble shoot this issue unless the camera is defective response please anyone ?????????
review image review image
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
93 of 111 people found the following review helpful
on June 4, 2011
After more than a decade shopping at Amazon, having bought hundreds of products, this may be my very first review ever.
The software in and around this device is very very bad. The security of mydlink is awful. The vendor, Circuit City, is awful.

I don't know what D-Link is thinking (probably not much).
First, for context, I do software for a living and one might imagine I would know more about routers, WiFi, UPnP, port forwarding, and other relevant networking concepts than most consumers of this device should have to.
Second, I'm not trying to do anything remotely fancy. Just what it says on the box.

Issues:

The Wizard seemed unable to put the device on my WiFi network, and offered zero feedback about what the issue might be. I have an absolutely vanilla network with WPA2 authentication.

The Wizard appears to be the *only* way to create a "mydlink" account and associate a device with it. (A "mydlink" account is required in order to access the iPhone and Android viewing features). The "mydlink" site itself has almost no features or controls. D-Link firmware has always been minimal, which is not all bad, but this site looks like it was written by junior high school students as a class project.

The Wizard and the "mydlink" site appear to be badly broken with respect to password handling. For example, I used a password generator to generate my passwords, and this generator, for security, creates passwords that include one or more punctuation characters (slash, plus, etc.) in the password; these characters choke up one or both of the Wizard and the mydlink site (the wizard and the site accept them without complaint, but just don't process them correctly). I could systematically reproduce this problem. Passwords are sent as HTTP parameters and URL-encoded; presumably they are not properly decoded by the "mydlink" server. The Wizard was annoyingly telling me to "check my connection to the Internet", but, in reality, the HTTP response from "mydlink" was telling my computer that the data sent by the Wizard wasn't being processed properly.

How do I know this was happening? Well, I watched the packets over the network. To my surprise (and mild shock), the system administration password for the camera is sent in human readable *plain* *text* over the Internet, to "mydlink" in an HTTP (not HTTPS) POST. For those who don't know what this means, it means "unbelievably bad security". Do you really want stealyourmoney.com watching your kid? I don't.

Next thing was to just use a bad password. OK, "cat" anybody? That password seemed to please the Wizard and "mydlink", however .... still no video on the "mydlink" site. Just a black screen counting down from 60 seconds.

OK, so I more or less gave up on "mydlink".
... maybe I can still use this from a PC...

But no, it doesn't end there. In the Web interface of the camera itself (i.e., not the Wizard), it *is* possible to set up WiFi, and yes, I can get video and audio, night vision, and the quality is not bad (audio does have background noise as reported in the other reviews, but I was not bothered about that). However it seems almost impossible to set the admin password (even to something alphanumeric, with only lower case letters!) and still be able to log out and log in again. So if you are OK with an empty password field to your camera watching your kid, then fine. But if you want a real password....

OK. So after quite a few hours. A night ruined. I guess I'll just return this. Amazon is pretty good about that right? Well this is Circuit City. And they are not pretty good about that. They are awful about it. Their policy is that you need to call the manufacturer and get a "defect confirmation". Once you do that, you can call them so they can give you an RMA number to get a replacement. Have you ever tried to get a consumer electronics manufacturer to confirm a software defect in writing? Do you think the replacement from Circuit City is going to have that software fixed?

(For the record, no, there is not a firmware update. Yes, I did enable UPnP. Yes I did verify that the port can be connected to remotely. Yes, I did revert the device to factory defaults ten or twenty times.)

Friends in the world, I recommend you AVOID this one.
66 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 466 answered questions


Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.