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41 of 45 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars SOLID, BUT NOT MOORE'S BEST WORK
Over the past 20 years Alan Moore has become one of the most celebrated and enigmatic writers in the comic book industry. He has written such books as the critically acclaimed "Watchmen", "V for Vendetta", as well as reviving the failing "Swamp Thing" series, all for DC Comics. In addition to these runs, Moore wrote a number of "guest stories" for various DC characters...
Published on January 26, 2006 by Tim Janson

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40 of 54 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DC's Collections Dept. Screws Up Again
It hasn't received much publicity, but DC screwed up big time with this TPB. It's a combination of the earlier Accross the niverse TPB with the PF format "What Ever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" collection and the Killing Joke one shot. well, when DC put this together someone forgot to restore the famous opening paragraph of WHttMoT which for the original collection...
Published on February 6, 2006 by J. Gualtieri


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41 of 45 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars SOLID, BUT NOT MOORE'S BEST WORK, January 26, 2006
This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
Over the past 20 years Alan Moore has become one of the most celebrated and enigmatic writers in the comic book industry. He has written such books as the critically acclaimed "Watchmen", "V for Vendetta", as well as reviving the failing "Swamp Thing" series, all for DC Comics. In addition to these runs, Moore wrote a number of "guest stories" for various DC characters in the mid-1980's and that is the subject of this new trade paperback. The book doesn't represent Moore's best comic writing and unfortunately none of the great stories he did for Swamp Thing are included in the book. Rather, these are a series of stories written for 16 issues of various titles between 1985 and 1988. They are all super hero tales and thus Moore did not have the kind of free reign that he did (mostly) on Swamp Thing but you can still get a great sense of his talent, even in stories for mundane and relatively forgotten characters like the Omega Men and The Vigilante.

In Superman Annual #11, Superman has been attacked in his fortress of solitude by Mongul who has attached a strange symbiotic life form to Superman's chest. He stands unmoving as Batman, Robin, and Wonder Woman arrive to see him. The creature puts Superman into a world where his greatest heart's wishes come true...he is back on Krypton which was not destroyed and has his own family including a son...a son who he has to painfully tell good bye to in order to fight off the effects of the creature.

DC Comics Presents #85 has a similar story. This time Superman has been infected by a Krptonian fungus that is causing him to experience fever, loss of powers, and delusions. After studying the fungus for twenty minutes, his microscopic vision gets out and he heads south...by car...resigned to die, but is eventually aided by Swamp Thing. Good story but I cannot ever imagine Superman simply giving up so easily, especially with the resources of brilliant minds like Ray Palmer, Batman, and the Martain Manhunter to call on for aid.

A two-part story from Superman #423 and Action Comics #583 tells the "last" Superman story. This was a bit of a sendoff before John Byrne revamped the character in Man of Steel #1. This future "what if' story tells the final fate of Superman, Lois, Jimmy Olsen as well as villains Lex Luthor, Brainiac, Bizarro and more. Done in 60's style with art by Curt Swan, this remains a highlight for me.

One of my favorite stories was the Phantom Strange story Moore did for Secret Origins #10. In this issue, four difference writers gave their own version of the Stranger's mysterious origin. In Moore's story, the Stranger is an angel who remained neutral in the battle between Heaven and the rebellious angels. Because he took no side, he was outcast from both Heaven and Hell and walks the world as a stranger. Powerful story.

Finally there is the one-shot special "Batman: the Killing Joke" in which the escaped Joker is at his most sadistic in what he does to both Commissioner Gordon and his daughter Barbara. Still a classic.

With Moore's messy split from DC several years ago due to disagreements over re-print and movie rights it's doubtful we'll ever see Moore work for DC again, but fans will always have the stories in this book to read and treasure at his incredible gift for telling a story.

Reviewed by Tim Janson
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Feast of Good Comics, April 11, 2011
This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
I'll review each individual story. Expect gushing praise

1) For the Man who has Everything-This classic story is normally remembered for its framing sequence, in which Batman Wonder Woman, and Robin II Jason Todd show up at the Fortress of Solitude to visit Superman for his Birthday, but are attacked By the villain Mongul, who has incapacitated Superman with the Black Mercy plant. The internal story of a possible Krypton that has fallen from glory is often forgotten, but no less interesting. 5 out of 5.
2) Night Olympics. This Green Arrow story is short, interesting but lacks substance, and uses Black Canary as a plot device to motivate Green Arrow instead of being treated like the badass metahuman she is 3 stars.
3)Mogo Doesn't Socialize. Written with almost Silver Age glee, this fun story has some cheesy dialogue but is intensely fun 5 stars
4)Father's Day This Vigilante story is good but controversial and a little inconsistent. The sudden shift between parts one and two in the characterization of the abusive father and his daughter's attitude towards him is jarring, and can take you out of the story. 4 stars
5)Brief Lives- a strange and surreal little tale in the outskirts of the DC universe, in which a group of megalomaniacal spiders attempt to inform a pair of blue giants that they have been conquered. Shades of Dr. Manhattan in the giants? 5 out of 5
6)A Man's World. The goofy tone does not suit the strange story twist. This tale should be utterly horrifying, but it fails to hammer in that horror properly. Creepy and borderline Misogynistic 1 star
7)The Jungle Line A crossover of Moore's take on Swamp Thing with Superman. Covers familiar ground with Supes but really gets across Swamp Thing's inner good will and kindness well. 4 stars
8) Tygers a phenomenal Green Lantern story that later served as the basis for everything done for that part of the DC Universe from 2004 on. Even on its own it is haunting and magnificent. 6 stars
9) Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? one of many great "last" Superman stories. set during the brief interim where the Crisis had ended but memory of the full extent of its events had not yet faded, and most history was still intact. The last experiences of the Earth-1 Superman, facing all his friends and foes, as the new horizon comes to erase him from history, he can finally have an ending. 5 out of 5.
10)Footsteps. This story, despite being presented alongside 3 other such possible stories, represents the most likely origin for the mysterious and supernatural Phantom Stranger. Interesting but not particualarly memorable. 3 stars.
11) In Blackest Night. (Can we agree to stop naming Green Lantern Stories after parts of the oath? It's getting repetitive) Another fun story, similar to Mogo, that focuses on an unusual member of the Green Lantern Corps. I really get the feeling that Moore would have made a fantastic regular writer for Green Lantern. 5 stars
12) Mortal Clay an off-beat, darkly humorous story starring the 3rd and least well-known incarnation of Clayface. A study on a "relationship" in which one of the members is a delusional supervillain and the other is a department store mannequin. So much better than it sounds. Also briefly features one of kindest views on Batman offered in the modern age of comics. 5 stars.
13) The Killing Joke. Moore in his normal overly self critical manner has said he despises the story, the artist Brian Bolland later puller a George Lucas and redrew his original work. They were both wrong. This is a deeply affecting pivotal moment in DC history, more for Barbara Gordon than Batman. It is also a great Joker story reinforced with crazy psychedelic coloring. The ending is a bit ambiguous but cool nonetheless. Had the most controversial story point from this not been used to strengthen Barbara Gordon and launch her in an all new direction I would probably resent this comic, but as it stands now it is one of the greats. 6 stars

A worthy collection, containing timeless classics, a few forgotten gems, and very brief stinkers. BUY IT
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40 of 54 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DC's Collections Dept. Screws Up Again, February 6, 2006
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This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
It hasn't received much publicity, but DC screwed up big time with this TPB. It's a combination of the earlier Accross the niverse TPB with the PF format "What Ever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" collection and the Killing Joke one shot. well, when DC put this together someone forgot to restore the famous opening paragraph of WHttMoT which for the original collection was placed on the back in leiu of an original text piece.

Now normally this might not be that big a deal, but that paragraph is famous and a powerful piece of writing. It might be corrected in future collections, but for now I'd recommend picking of the original Accross the Universe TPB instead and the seperate releases of WHttMoT and Killing Joke.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Be Careful Which Edition You Buy., February 16, 2013
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This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
These stories are simply the best. Unlike the new hardcover which leaves out a lot of Moore's most famous stories (but does include a lot of the Wildstorm stuff, where this collection does not). Also, there's another version of this collection in softcover that has Alan's face and image on it. But that one leaves out a couple key things including the amazing intro to "Whatever Happened To The Man Of Tomorrow". All that said, this is the collection to have. It includes the original coloring for Killing Joke as well. One of my favorite stories in the collection is a Batman story called MORTAL CLAY which was drawn by George Freeman and is worth every penny of the collection. Not only is it mind-blowingly clever, but it even reveals that which is so often ignored in Batman's character -- his compassion.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good to Great stories - but not Alan Moore's best work, March 19, 2007
This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
While this is a great collection of comics, it certainly isn't Alan Moore's best work. His best work was done outside of DC Comics. Further, his best work for DC Comics is represented by Watchmen and Swamp Thing, both of which provided him with quite a bit of creative freedom. This trade paperback collects all of the filler stories he wrote for DC in the later part of the 1980's. The stories are quite good given what they are (guest writing, filler stories, staple characters with strict editorial guidelines) - but they fail to compare to much of Moore's other work.

The highlights of this collection are definitely the Superman stories - notably "For The Man Who Has Everything" and "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow". I really like the later, as it is drawn by Curt Swan who gives it a very classic look, and inked by George Perez who gives it a modern finish. Both are great and rank among my favorite Superman stories (which is admittedly a short list).

There is another Superman story from DC Comics Presents featuring Swamp Thing, but it falls flat for me. Moore's Superman doesn't act as Superman should. Another entry in the 'average' ranking is a two issue Vigilante story which reads well enough, but in the end lacks anything particularly special.

There are a few Green Lantern stories; most of which are quite short. And yet, while being short, they are quite enjoyable and are some of the Green Lantern stories I remember the best.

The Green Arrow/Black Canary story is short but good. A short origin story for Phantom Stranger is included, which I might have liked if I could get myself to care about The Phantom Stranger in the least bit - but I can't. And there is a short Omega Men story which I rather liked.

Finally, this collection includes "The Killing Joke". I really liked this when it came out, but I've come to think that it is a bit overrated. While I'm sure it deserves some credit for giving some new life to The Joker, in the end it is just a good, solid Batman story. Other writers have done better, and didn't need to destroy a character to do so. (Although, without Batgirl's crippling, Ostrander would not have been able to create Oracle. So it did work out well in the end.)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More of Moore, August 6, 2009
This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
Most of Alan Moore's big stuff (Watchmen, V for Vendetta, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, etc...) is easily picked up from collected editions, but the big guy did a lot of work before he became the Big Guy. When making the move from British to American comics, he did lots of fill-ins and back-up short stories, lots of random stuff for random characters.

So while it is quite easy to get collected editions of his major work, tracking down all of these smaller pieces has been a chore. Not all of them are excellent, and most are of the era that they were written, but they all show a spark of Moore's genius and are worth reading. Moore is, after all, not a one-note writer, and his comedic pieces are just as great as his "serious" work.

"DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore" combines an older collection, Across the Universe: The DC Universe Stories of Alan Moore with another Moore-authored masterpiece Batman: The Killing Joke. "Batman: The Killing Joke" has been widely available for years, but it is a nice extra in this collected edition. Also included are Moore's Superman stories "For the Man who has Everything" with Watchmen collaborator Dave Gibbons and "Whatever Happened to the Man from Tomorrow?," Moore's legendary ending to the Superman comic series before the Crisis on Infinite Earths re-boot.

There is a lot of comic book history packed in here, and some of it may be unknown to modern readers. Characters like The Vigilante and The Omega Men have not survived to the modern era, although they are fondly remembered. Others, like Green Arrow and Black Canary, The Green Lantern Corps, and The Phantom Stranger are well-known. Probably my favorite piece in the books was the Tales of the Green Lantern Corps story "Mogo Doesn't Socialize." I knew about Mogo, the living planet member of the Green Lantern Corps, but I didn't realize that he (it?) was an Alan Moore creation.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alan Moore...what else needs to be said?, January 28, 2006
This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
From the new cover art provided so generously by Brian Bolland to the commentaries between books this is easily worth the money you pay for it. Alan Moore's stories for DC are always good, and this book just compiles them leaving you to feel like a kid in a candy store.

Get your fix of "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" and the greatest Green Lantern comic ever "Mogo Doesn't Socialize". The compilation now includes the controversial graphic novel "The Killing Joke" and so much more.

As mentioned previously, who knows if he will ever write for DC ever again? So if you consider yourself a fan of Alan Moore's work, you owe it to yourself to buy this!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "If I'm going to have a past, I want it to be multiple choice.", May 17, 2008
By 
Sam Thursday (APO, AE United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
DC Comics nearly hit a home run with this one - the book is absolutely worth the cover price and then some for the three Superman stories - "For the Man Who Has Everything" with "Watchmen" collaborator Dave Gibbons, "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" with the legendary Curt Swan, and "The Jungle Line" with the excellent Rick Veitch - and of course, there's the now-classic Joker story with wonderful art by Brian Bolland ("The Killing Joke").

The Omega Men and Green Lantern 8-pagers are terrific, too (a couple have art by "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" penciler Kevin O'Neill), and the Clayface story from the Batman annual isn't half bad (although the art is a little lame).

There's a lengthy Green Arrow story that has a painful phoned-in feel to it, though, and the Dr. Fate origin story is fine, but the art isn't much to look at.

Those are both pretty minor niggles - the real gripe I have with this otherwise terrific book is that the lovely introductory prose section in "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow" hasn't been restored on the first page (it was on a page of its own in the last reprint, and that page is gone now). DC pulls stuff like this all the time for no discernible reason other than lazy copy editing, but it gets old fast (there's a full page left out of "Swamp Thing: Love and Death").

At any rate, if you've never read the stories before you won't miss the little introduction to "Man of Tomorrow," and most of the stories in here are beyond reproach. Moore is a terrific writer and did things with the characters in this book that no one had ever thought to do before (he continued to do them, by the way, during his run on "Supreme" a few years later). An excellent purchase.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent short-form, November 9, 2009
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Amazon Customer (Chicago, IL, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
These stories are among the most accessible, best-written graphic works I've read. Very little background is required, a rarity in the DC Universe, and each story is evocative and firmly rooted in the human experience. At the same time, Moore doesn't lose sight of his audience, and delivers on the promise of superheroes. The tone of the stories included ranges from humor to cosmic horror. The stories tend towards psychological horror, in that they all involve an inspection of the heroes' psyche as they are put under great duress.

While the selling point is clearly the writer, the art here is, occasionally breath-taking. Much of it feels very standard, in the vein of Dave Gibbons, but a few stories do stick out. "The Killing Joke", "Night Olympics", and "Mortal Clay" would be stunning even without Moore's writing, whereas the other stories at least do justice to the author.

The version I received from Amazon is the 2006 edition, which includes "The Killing Joke" and "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?". These stories have been removed from subsequent editions, as DC decided they would sell on their own. Finding the 2006 edition in bricks and mortar stores is a crap shoot, and the price does not reflect the removal of these stories. I highly recommend the book, and purchasing from Amazon.
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4.0 out of 5 stars it's solid, October 17, 2010
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This review is from: DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore (Paperback)
It's Alan Moore, so you know its going to be good, and this is a nice collection of his DC work. There are some real short classics in here. It's not all of his best stuff, but the fact that it includes Mogo Doesn't Socialize is worth the money. It may be worth it, if you're a collector, to just find the actual issues. But, if that doesn't concern you, yet you are a fan of Moore (especially his earlier stuff), then this is a must-have.
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DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore
DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore by Alan Moore (Paperback - January 11, 2006)
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