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111 of 113 people found the following review helpful
on December 7, 2003
Ok, I read the reviews ... I assembled the tool with critical attention to detail and here is what I have realized. This drill press is well worth the ticket price. The assembly is straight forward (although messy due to rust inhibiting oils) and can be completed in about 20 minutes. This unit hasn't rated very high on Amazon but the user complaints that I have read about are easily avoidable.
1) The fact that changing speeds is a manual process on this unit (disconnecting and reconnecting belts and pulleys) seems to be a blessing - the variable speed mechanisms on other units are a source of aggravating maintenance.
2) Setting the chuck is simple and effective. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS and clean the hardware (spindle and chuck) before setting the component. Delta recommends an oven cleaner / degreaser which worked beautifully. If ANY OIL remains on either component, the chuck won't set properly and will eventually come off.
3) Complaints about wobbly bits and seemingly misaligned chucks are most likely caused by two factors: (A) drill bits aren't all machined perfectly straight. Clamp your bit as high on the smooth shaft as possible to alleviate wobbling. I tested a range of my bits and some move more than others (usually the cheaper ones :) (B) Use the appropriate speed for the bit and material you are working with. The guide provided by delta is very helpful and has already alleviated a complaint of mine when using spade bits - I was spinning long spade bits at an unnecessary speed.
All in all, if the chuck is set correctly and your bits are true, there won't be any wobble.
Buy it, try it, and return it if you don't like it. For the price, you can't beat it.
I am quite happy with my purchase.
Update:
The unit is still working perfectly after extensive use. The chuck is stable and wobble free. I couldn't be happier.
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49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
on September 30, 2005
Well built, but not enough power. I picked up 2 of these from lowes, and a 10 inch Drill press (#21900) from sears to compare. I ended up getting 2 from lowes because the first one i thought was defective, the pin that holds the drilling table level was drilled in at an angle, which i thought was just bad workmanship. I picked up a second one from lowes to compare it with, and the second one ended up having a broken switch housing,But the pin was straight on this one, so i switched the drilling table and ended up with 1 complete drill press. I was making a wine bottle holder and needed to make 2 inch and 4 inch holes with the hole saw drill bits. Even on the lowest speed setting, there was not enough power, and the motor would lock up many times(stop). It took over a minute to make each hole. I used my Hand drill and made the holes in less than half that time. I tried forstner bits and spade bits on the same 3/4 plywood for testing purposes, and again with the motor lockups. I picked up the 10 inch drill press from sears and ran the same tests. In comparing the two, the sears unit is slightly small, but same height. the base is about an inch smaller on each side, the table is about 1 inch smaller on each side, and the main pole/shaft is also about 1/2 less in diameter. The belt/pulley/press on both units are roughly the same size though. The sears drill press has 2/3 hp, of wich i could feel the difference immediately. It made short work of the same

projects attempted earlier with the Delta. Not once did the motor on the sears drill press lock up, even on the same speed/torque belt setting. In conjunction with the more powerful motor, the sears unit also had a laser guide, which was a plus. I ended up returning these delta drill presses back to lowes, since the motor driving them was just not enough power. Since manufacturers usually list hp as peak, the delta probably had way less than the 1/4 hp listed. My overall impression was that the delta drill press was a well built drill press unit that is severely underpowered, which makes it nice to look at, but pretty much useless for my needs. It appeared to me that it was built for a bigger motor, but probably ended up getting cut for cost reasons. I would highly recommend looking into the sears unit for about the same $. It offers a laser guide, a fence and stop block,

which i used a lot for drilling out the holes for cabinet hinge cups. it also has a much larger, more powerful motor, with an electric brake that had enough power to drill through all of my wood projects. Both units employed the belt drive system with pulleys, which at first i did not like, but after using for

several minutes, ended up liking. Sure a transmission style drive system would be nice, but much more money, and not really worth it for me. The belt system allows for lower speeds and an increase in torque, something that a speed controller does not add. For example, by holding the trigger a little lighter on your hand drill, slows the speed down, but doesn't give you more torque. that would require a gear or transmission change from "high" to "low". The belt system is like that "high/Low" switch on your hand drills, but with greater variation, or more gearing options to choose from. For a $100 drill press, the pulley system is a great "manual" transmission. The depth adjust on the delta is a joke, and seems to be common among the cheaper drill presses (ryobi). It is adjusted on the press lever and constantly slips. A better alternative is that found on the Craftsman, an actual depth stop, like those used on plunge routers and biscuit joiners. I wasn't looking for a monster drill press that could drill holes through rocks with blazing speed. Just something that was accurate and had more torque and power than my 18v Bosch Cordless drill. I agree with the other reviewers who say this is a well built unit, with the exception of the depth stop and limited power. Look at other units similarily priced.

pros: well built, sturdy, good size, nice to look at, looks powerful.

cons: weak motor with no balls, does not perform as well as it looks. handles keep coming loose, depth adjust is a joke as it constantly slips.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on February 11, 2005
I just started to learn cabinetry, and realized that I would need to use large Forstner bits. Due to the shear size there is no way I could ever mount them in a hand drill. Also, Forstner bits typically require low RPM which is hard to control with a hand drill.

Enter the drill press...

I did some on-line research and found this model Delta to be generally well-received. I was torn between buying a full floor model instead of a bench-top drill. After putting this unit through its paces, I do not regret my decision!

The setup only took me about 20 minutes, as noted by the other reviewers. I wiped off the anti-corrosive oil with some brush cleaner. It attacked the paint on the base a little, but not enough to worry about.

Some have said to save a few dollars by buying one of the lower models. However, after drilling holes for Blum hinges, I can honestly say that having the rack-and-pinion table lifter makes adjustments much easier. The light was very useful for locating the marks that I center-punched. I paid $97 at Lowe's for this drill press, and it has been worth every penny!

Changing speeds is quite simple. I have used variable systems like the DP350 has. While nice, I found them to be annoying because you really don't know exactly what speed the drill is set to. With belt-driven wheels, you set the exact speed that you need based on the material and bit.

The induction motor is whisper quiet. All you'll hear is a hum until the bit hits the wood. Then it's all business!
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on June 22, 2003
This is a very nice light-to-medium duty drill press suitable for the occasional user. After reading the other review here, I was wary about the quality, but the press has served me well. The thing is built like a rock; the local post office people could not believe a tool this heavy was shipped through conventional mail. (I took advantage of a free super-savings shipping deal from Amazon.) The assembly took a very easy twenty minutes, much of which time was wiping off the corrosion-resistant packaging grease (have a few old disposable rags for this purpose available). All the parts and special tools are included. Some of these you may not need; example, the tie-down bolts for anchoring the base to a bench. These are only necessary for a permanent mounting or if the unit wobbles during operation; I did not need them. My only minor gripe is that the variable speed feature requires resetting the drive belt manually, but this is certainly something with which I can live . I love the little adjustable gooseneck light. It operates independently of the drill press and can be used as a general workbench lamp. Procure a 40-watt (max) reflector bulb (like is used for track lighting) for this purpose. I think it is a great buy.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on February 6, 2004
The Delta DP200 isn't a particularly fancy drill press -- no electronic speed contol, for example. But what do you actually NEED in a drill press?
* Smooth operation
* predictable and adjustable speed with good torque
* easily set and repeatable depth control.
The DF200 does all of that, does it well, and does it at a very good price.
Initial setup takes about 20', and requires that you be able to actually read and follow directions. DO make sure to remove all traces of oil when setting the chuck. But once you've set it up, the DP200 will sit on your bench, doing it's job, without muss or fuss for years. Hard to beat or question at this price.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on December 29, 2004
I do a significant amount of woodworking, espescially cabinet making, and I used to envy the large floor drill presses that you see in professional shops. However, I have found no need to graduate from my current Delta 10" drill press to a larger one. I have been extrememly pleased with the precision and smooth performance my drill provides and would highly reccomend it to any woodworker who will not need to drill mortises in the end of bedposts or other long items.

For every-day use I can think of no other drill I would rather have. For those who use a drill frequently, a more functional table should be made or bought that allows for greater flexibilty in clamping and use of a fence. For those who complain about the size of the provided table, they ought to examine the competition. Delta has provided a table comparable to most manufacturers and provided mounting locations for a larger table attachment.

The motor has been ample to power through oak, maple, and other hardwoods, even with large forstner bits. I have no concerns about the need for any larger motor.

Size envy with drill presses can often cause a person to over-spend and buy a tool that far exceeds the needs of the owner. I would consider the material that you will be drilling most often and see if a full-size drill press will truly be necessary. I know that many large drill presses have a large variety of speeds, as many as 18, but the most commonly needed speeds are available on the 10" press.

Overall I highly reccomend this drill press to anyone who does not absoultly need a full sized drill press.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on January 1, 2005
My local Lowe's has this drill press for 89.99 and last week-end it was on sale for 20% off which made it pretty amazingly cheap to pass up.

It is well made and solid and, for the price, incredible. I've been making due in my shop without a drill press, using my hand drill (which was more than the $69 I paid for this machine) on a guide. I'm very glad to have this.

I've found it to be true, and smooth running. Time will tell about durability, but for $69 it has to be a five-star item.

Couple of tips. Lots of machine grease everywhere. Wear gloves (I wear latex gloves in my shop which work great) or be prepared to get your hands really messy. Use a good solvent off the bat and take the oil off. I used acetone, which attacks the paint Delta uses, but I don't care. It eliminated all the oil from the chuck and cone and allowed me to seat it well on the first go.

Do get it bolted down, despite what the instructions say. It's a heavy machine, but much of the weight is in the motor (high) so better be safe than sorry.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on April 23, 2004
I bought this press for a beginners woodwork shop. It was easy to set up, and I think the workmanship is much better than that of other similiar presses I looked at. My problem is with the design of the table. First, it is small (7.5" x 7.5"), but I will be making a larger, add-on table for woodworking, so the size is not a problem. The problem is how difficult it is to mount anything to the table. There are two parallel slots in the table face on either side of the center opening. The better designed tables have four slots that radiate out from the center, which enables you to vary mounting points. With the Delta, if the bolts on the fixture you are trying to mount (be it add-on table or metal working vise) aren't 4.5" apart, you're out of luck. And it isn't easy to clamp anything to the table either. There are ribs on the bottom that seem to be right in the way - with some parallel to the table top and others on an angle from it. Don't get me wrong, I like the drill press, but it's taking me a lot more work to make it fit my needs than it should.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 5, 2005
It took me about 40 minutes to set up, but I was meticulous. There was a lot of packing grease -- no problem.

The speed change is much easier than with most similar drill presses.

It runs very well and quite quietly.

I ran a 1-3/8 in Forstner bit through 5/8 in red oak. I could stall it, but running on the lowest speed and adjusting feed rate, it went quite well.

I'm quite pleased
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon January 25, 2004
For the money, an excellent drill. If you are buying on budget and just need a starter drill consder the DP115. The differences are that the DP115 (compared to the DP200 shown here) (1) does not have the built in work light, (2) does not have a crank and gear for height adjustment -- it just has a tightening collar, (3) the quill only has 8" of travel instead of 10" as onthis model. If you can live with those differences you can save a lot (about 33%) on your purchase. The DP115 can regularly be found for about 20% less. And on sale you can find the DP115 for about $69. That's a great price for a starter drill press.
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