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102 of 104 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not LPB or Skylanders, but a little bit of both
QUICK SUMMARY: A decent game, especially for children ages 6-10. Can become a bit repetitive, and the building/creation aspect is more limited than games like Little Big Planet. It is very heavy on the Disney theme, making you feel like you are really playing in the Disney/Pixar universe. The artistic direction can be a little "childish", with a lot of the NPCs/Enemies...
Published 15 months ago by A. C. M. C.

versus
91 of 104 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some frustrations but an enjoyable experience overall.
I assume we're going to see a lot of negativity with the nickle-and-dime approach this game has taken so let's knock this out of the way right now.
1) You will have to buy companion characters to play couch co-op in the themed levels, but the toy box can take any combos.
2) I've seen at least one area in the cars playset that can't be unlocked without buying all...
Published 17 months ago by Char


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102 of 104 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not LPB or Skylanders, but a little bit of both, October 30, 2013
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
QUICK SUMMARY: A decent game, especially for children ages 6-10. Can become a bit repetitive, and the building/creation aspect is more limited than games like Little Big Planet. It is very heavy on the Disney theme, making you feel like you are really playing in the Disney/Pixar universe. The artistic direction can be a little "childish", with a lot of the NPCs/Enemies having a Little Tikes look to them. Production-wise, very good. The game, itself, is stable with crashes or bugs being pretty rare. The figurines and base are solid, high quality, and not prone to breaking. There are a few packaging issues (like needing to buy additional figurines if you want to play multiplayer), but nothing unexpected. Overall, nothing groundbreaking but good for what it is.

WHO SHOULD BUY:
1. Anyone with a serious love for certain Disney or Pixar movies. Some Disney franchises are tragically under-represented (Mickey and his gang, for one), but those that are represented are very well done.
2. Anyone with a younger child who enjoys playing video games; particularly ages 6-10. Most of the game is playable and welcoming to them, so that there are pleasantly few frustrating or "I can't do it!" moments.
3. Anyone who likes more open-world play as opposed to on-rails, or structured play.
4. Anyone who likes the enjoyment of building a world with already-created set-pieces, but is not too interested in making fully original designs from scratch.

DESCRIPTION: Disney's Infinity is a video game based, obviously, in the Disney/Pixar universe. In it, you take on the role of one of a stable of Disney characters and play through missions in their perspective worlds. While doing this, you collect objects and decorations that you can then use to build your own world to play in. The base game, for which this is a review of, comes with one character for each of the three base worlds; Monsters Inc, Pirates of the Caribbean, and The Incredibles. You can buy other figurines for each of the three worlds, and will need to do so to play multiplayer locally. Each world is kind of like its own game, giving the over-all experience some needed depth and variety (although, not all of the 3 worlds are equal. Some are definitely better than others).

The Toybox aspect, which is the part where you use collected pieces to build your own world, is also a nice addition to the game. If you are expecting the truly open and creative experience of Little Big Planet, though, you will be disappointed. Infinity's building aspect is a lot more about putting down pre-designed set pieces than about creating your own, unique ideas and objects. The list of available set pieces is pretty massive, but their interaction with each other is almost non-existant; making some of the more Rube Goldberg machine creations seen in other creation games impossible here.

Disney's Infinity has a lot on offer; some of it done very well, and other parts just being "okay". There are a few areas worth touching on, however.

GAME PIECES/MERCHANDISE: The game pieces, themselves, are pretty well designed. They are all of sturdy, tough plastic that have a good weight and feel to them. The look of them is great, and matches their in-game look very well (which is, admittedly, a little more "childish" than usual for some of them). The base where the pieces sit is just as well constructed. The whole set gives you the feel that you can play with them and not have to worry too much about them breaking. My 5-year-old daughter plays with them, and even sleeps with them, and they remain as pristine as ever.

With that said, the base set only comes with one character for each of the three worlds. The problem with that is you NEED a character from their world in order to play in that world. If you happen to lose, say, Mr. Incredible then you will no longer be able to play in The Incredibles world. In addition, this means you cannot play local multiplayer in any of the three worlds unless you pay for additional characters for that world. This is not too much of a problem, considering most people will want to buy additional characters to have them, anyway, but could be a problem for anyone thinking they only need to buy this base set for, say, their two children to play together.

In addition to the character figures, there is also what is called a playset piece; in this case a clear octagonal piece. This is what tells the game which world you want to play in. The one in the base set tells the game you want to play in any of the three base worlds; Monsters Inc, Pirates, and Incredibles. If you wanted to play in, say, the Cars world you would need the Cars playset piece first. This system works pretty well, if seeming kind of redundant (if I have an Incredibles figurine on the base then it is a good assumption that is the world I want to play in). The problem, though, is that if you lose that clear octagonal piece then you have a serious problem. Suddenly, you cannot play in ANY of the three base worlds. This is made worse by Disney not offering any way to purchase just that single piece if you do lose it; unlike being able to purchase a new Pirates figure if you happen to lose your Jack Sparrow. In short, make sure you keep that clear octagonal piece VERY safe.

GAME WORLDS/PLAY: The three base game worlds are all pretty well-designed, but do vary in their level of fun. For the most part, all three worlds (and all of the expansion worlds) have taken an open-world design approach. This means the game puts you into the characters world, and then lets you mostly roam around as you please. The game does give you LOTS of side missions as well as a central story mission to complete, but does not put you on rails and force you into doing it. New parts of the world are usually unlocked by doing the story missions, but you are free to play around as much as you like in the parts you already have access too. This is one of the best aspects of the game; especially for younger players. If a particular mission is too frustrating for them, they can simply ignore it and still continue to play around and have fun. It also gives some replayability to the game; so that even after I have beaten a world's main story I can still play around freely in that world. My 5-year-old daughter still loves roaming around The Incredibles world beating up random robots or throwing citizens into the water. The game does sacrifice a stronger, linear narrative for this, however. This means if you are interested in a more heavily-crafted story experience, like the one found in Skylanders, then you may find this a bit lacking in that department.

The missions in the worlds do tend to suffer from severe repetitiveness. Some worlds are worse about this than others, though. The Monster's Inc world, in particular, quickly feels like you are doing the same things over and over again. The Incredibles has more variety, or at least does a better job of reskinning the same missions to make them at least feel different. In addition to this, the worlds themselves do not have a lot of variety to them. The Monster's Inc world is set in their college area location, and does not deviate from that much at all. No new scenery or environments to explore. Just the same thing throughout. Same for The Incredibles, which puts you into Metroville, and that is where you stay the entire time. It is disappointing not to venture out to, say, Syndrome's island lair. Pirates feels a bit more open and varied, but that is mainly due to how it segments the play between land segments where you roam around on islands and the water segments where you literally sail a pirate ship and do battle at sea. The Pirates is the best at giving you more variety of play and environment with The Incredibles coming in second. Monsters Inc is the worst at this. It does not take much time in the Monsters world before you feel as if you have done everything it has to offer. It also does not have much to make you want to come back to it later.

There are some bright spots in the gameplay, however. Unlocking new superhero toys to play with in The Incredibles felt very rewarding, and went a long way to changing up the game play. Additionally, the sailing aspect of the Pirates world cannot be over-praised. It could be an entire game unto itself and still be rewarding and fun. The base game does offer a decent amount of interesting and engaging game-play, but it does suffer from an over-all lack of variety. The toybox/building aspect of the game was meant to take up the slack in this aspect, but I am not completely sold on it doing such.

TOYBOX/BUILDING: For me, the Toybox part of the game was the most disappointing. I am a large fan of games like Little Big Planet that sets a player's creativity free, and allows them to build just about anything they can imagine. Infinity does not really do that. It provides you with set pieces, and lets you organize and arrange them how you see fit. If there is something you would like to have in your world that is not already a set piece, however, you are completely out of luck. It is the equivalent to playing with a dollhouse and its furniture to that of playing with a set of legos. The dollhouse furniture may look nicer in design, but the legos let you do a lot more.

Additionally, telling an actual story in your created world is nigh impossible. This is the most tragic part; that Disney did not bother to provide any tools that would allow a player to craft an actual experience for their world. Instead, all a player can do is craft what is basically a sight-seeing tour or an obstacle course. None of the amazing stories told through game-play and narration that was possible in Little Big Planet. For being based in a Universe that is basically all about telling stories, I found this to be the most disappointing part of the game. When you are finished building your toybox world, you do not really "play" it. Instead, you roam around it much as you would an open-world setting minus any missions, goals, or story-line.

Another place Disney missed out on is the sharing aspect of their Toybox. As a player, you cannot simply go online and look through a list of other toybox worlds other players have created, choose one, and play it. When a player creates a world, they do not get to load it up so other people can enjoy whatever they have designed. Instead, the world has to be submitted directly to Disney who then gets to choose whether to approve and put it up. From what I have seen, they only ever put up about 2 or 3 new worlds a week; meaning thousands of others simply get ignored and never get played. This really diminishes any urge or drive to craft something amazing; considering it is very likely no one else will ever even see it. This also greatly kills any extended game-play that Infinity might have otherwise had. Once you have seen the 2 new worlds Disney decided to upload that week, you are done. Nothing else to see or do until they finally decide to put up 2 more several days later.

It is strange to see a company put effort into allowing players to create things with their product, but then severely limit their ability to create and their ability to let others experience what they have created.

GRAPHICS/SOUND/CONTROLS/ETC: The graphics, sound, and controls are all well designed. The colors are bright, pleasing, and appropriate for their perspective worlds. Everything does have a bit more of a "childish" edge than even their origin movies did, however. None of the controls seem particularly frustrating, which is saying a lot considering some worlds have significantly different control-schemes for them. For instance, the beat'em-up style of The Incredibles works just as well as the ship controls for the sea battles in Pirates. Even the creation controls for the Toy box are pretty well designed. None of the music ever becomes repetitive to the point of nauseum, and all of the sounds have appropriate weight to them. Overall, graphics/sound/control design were appropriate and very well done in the game.

CLOSING: Overall, Disney's Infinity is good for what it is. People looking for a long, drawn-out, story-driven experience with lots of variety in environments and gameplay are probably not going to find it here. On the other hand, people wanting a game they can just "play around in" will find a very welcoming world for exactly that type of play here. Children, in particular, will find a place they can enjoy spending time in without feeling too frustrated or boxed out. The creation aspect of the game is lacking in scope and definitely feels too limiting, but if you are a person who preferred to play with toy train sets rather than build your own world out of construction paper and glue then it can be pretty fun.

If I were asked if I would recommend it, I would say "Yes... but mostly to certain people, or to people with children."

I truly hope this review helped at least one person decide whether to buy Infinity or not.
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91 of 104 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some frustrations but an enjoyable experience overall., August 18, 2013
This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
I assume we're going to see a lot of negativity with the nickle-and-dime approach this game has taken so let's knock this out of the way right now.
1) You will have to buy companion characters to play couch co-op in the themed levels, but the toy box can take any combos.
2) I've seen at least one area in the cars playset that can't be unlocked without buying all 4 available cars figures, so there are probably more of these areas.

Bottom line: Its going to take an investment to get the most out of this game just to warn you.

Now that's out of the way the game is pretty fun. The starter pack comes with Jack Sparrow, Sully, and Mr. Incredible all with their respective levels. The individual worlds are nicely detailed and fun to explore with a lot of vertical space to transverse. The missions in the levels rely on the "fetch quest" type a bit too much for my tastes, but younger kids should have no trouble jumping right in.

The toy box is the main draw. You start out with a pre-made world that you can change to your hearts content. Create racing games, battle, build your own castle. There is a system in place where you get tokens where you can buy more pieces to build with. The main problem here is its a gambling type unlock. Each token gives you one spin and the chances you'll get what you want aren't great without banking tons of spin tokens.

The buidling itself is very easy. I found it more intuitive than LBP. Its very similar to create-a-park in the old Tony Hawk games. Essentially pick you pieces ans drop them in place.

I'm having a lot of fun with the game and my daughter, who is still a little too young to play, loves to watch the game. She recognizes her favorite characters and yells at them as they pop up on screen.

The only other big thing pulling the score down is the game is having some trouble running. My character randomly becomes unresponsive. At first I thought moving the characters from the disc was causing this, but it turned out to be the game servers. If you're having this issue the disable your internet connection, and that should correct the problem.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fun, but misses several key marks, December 20, 2013
By 
Joel Ford (Santa Cruz, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
Well, the game is fun. Especially with kids. I'll give it that. However, it fails on several key fronts:

First, there is no reason that this game should have been tied to a toy franchise. The toys merely unlock characters in the game. No significant data is stored on them, and leveling them up does nothing for the characters themselves other than incrementing a numeric value. From a collector's perspective or a child's perspective, it might be nice to have figurines to show off or play with, but from a gamer's perspective, this is an entirely egregious use of resources and a rip-off to boot. They could have made the same game without the portal of power knock-off and the toys that go along with it, charged less money, and focused more resources on improving on the game itself, which is lacking, in the end. The Toy Story 3 game, which this one was clearly based on, was great, affordable, and provided fantastic game-play, both linear and open ended. Disney infinity is a stumble in the a half-right, half-wrong direction.

Second off, the creative toy box mode is extremely limited and totally buggy. You cannot fill your toy box with much before it maxes out and forces you to delete things if you want to add more. You cannot make anything you create in it interactive beyond the built-in interactivity of the objects you place; you can't create missions, or dialog, or set up any sort of logic-triggered events. And it often breaks. Many times have I placed an object and wanted to move it around and found it permanently fixed in space with no way to select it. This is one of several unacceptable glitches in this mode that make it frustrating more than fun, more stifling than freeing.

Finally, co-op presents many missed opportunities. I love couch co-op, I love playing video games with my kid. This one is pretty fun for a little while. Still, forcing you to buy more toys to unlock specific characters in order to even play co-op after you're already spent 70$ on the game is an insult. See, you can't bring characters from different movies into each others' worlds. This right here is a huge missed opportunity for fun. What's more, there is no co-op specific content. There are no vehicles that can carry two people. There are no missions requiring two players, co-operation, or that particularly benefit from being carried out by two people other than you might finish them faster which means you likely have to split up anyways.

Again, it can be fun for kids. Disney Infinity is more creative than its obvious counterpart, Skylanders, provides more interest methods of travel throughout its worlds, and is a fine way to distract or spend an evening with your kid. But it doesn't really live up to its promises, and takes on the excessively wasteful and expensive baggage of real world toys without any clear reason or obvious benefit other than to make more money.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars WTF Disney, February 23, 2014
This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
You can only play with two players if you have two figurines of the same movie.

If you're gonna buy this game, you might as well add at least another 60 bucks so you can add to your cart the figures that match this set.

Example: You can't play Monsters University world with Sullivan and Jack Sparrow. You have to have the green eyeball too.

:(
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great fun for the family!, December 26, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
I thought this looked cool and I got it for the family for Christmas. What fun this game is! I am 39 and I enjoy it, and my son who is 7 enjoys it. So I think it's great for the whole family. I don't know what else to say about it, other than it was worth the price. It does kind of suck that you cannot unlock characters though gameplay, and you have to buy them. But the cost is minimal and you can buy the ones you want. So it's a cash cow for sure, but still it's worth it for the family fun it provides.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AWESOME, January 8, 2014
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This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
I am so glad I was able to get this on Amazon as all local stores where sold out for the Holidays. Plus, I got it within a week which was very impressive. Keep up the Good Work Amazon. Thank you.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kids LOVE it!, January 8, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
We are huge Disney fans so have wanted this game since it came out. We bought it for Christmas and it has exceeded our expectations!! The kids (and husband) absolutely LOVE it!! As other people have said, the bad thing about this game is you have to have 2 characters from the same movie to play in that world. So with the starter kit if you want more than one person to play you have to play in the toybox. My kids loved doing this until we just went and bought Dash so they can play in the Incredibles world and now they like that better and are sick of the toybox. So it will be an investment for us to get all the characters we want but I still feel it was well worth it. I think everyone that likes video games will love this one but especially if you love Disney too!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for younger kids, January 6, 2014
By 
Elizabeth Ann Ferrell (Ft. Leonard Wood, MO) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
Not super difficult missions for my 6 year old. Still enjoyable for 9 yo and my husband ;) The expanders are reasonably priced, which is nice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Versatile but incomplete Disney universe, December 5, 2013
By 
Wayne (Silicon Valley, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
It's hard to think of this as a single game since it offers so many options. But the options are also the limitations of the starter pack. The figures join the game when they are placed on the pad, and interact with the appropriate world. Since the game makes use of the options through what appears to be some sort of RFID technology it allows the game to be expanded.

The most important factor is the level of fun. While this game is well suited to young children, it didn't stop my teenage son from enjoying it, even though it's a far cry from the games he typically plays, which are the types that parents would want to keep away from younger users.

The starting figures are Mr. Incredible, Jack Sparrow, and Sully, and are from different movies. Sully in particular is the "Monsters University" version, so the game is geared to that setting. But since you don't get any other characters from those settings, you can't interact with them unless you buy more.

Since Disney makes it clear that this is a starter set, I don't think it's fair to be overly critical of these limitations. But you do need to know of them going into it, and you should expect to get expansion packs as you go along, or put them on your holiday wish list along with this item. The Exclusive Amazon DISNEY INFINITY Infinite Bundle had not yet been released at the time I wrote this, but was in the $200 range. That should give you an idea of what it would cost to get the most full featured experience. And that experience is effectively seven different sets of games within the Disney universe, including the characters to fill out the ones that come with the starter set.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Disney Infinity: not a bad start, but could use some work, December 22, 2013
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 (Video Game)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Length:: 9:47 Mins

Disney Infinity is Disney's answer to Skylanders. It is the same type of business model where they sell you a starter pack (like Pokemon) which gets you the game, and a few characters. Everything else is an add-on, you can get extra levels by buying "expansion packs" in the way of new "play sets" (which come with certain characters), you can get extra characters by buying more character figures. You can also get additional powers for the characters by buying "power discs."

Each "play set" is a platformer/adventure level that has a story to it for the characters that inhabit that world (and ONLY for the characters from that world). You CAN play with all of the characters together, but ONLY in the "toy box" mode, which is basically a build-your-own-world/level kind of mode.

The game is very controlled and structured with what you can do with it. You can drop in and out characters that go with a specific playset (but you cannot mix and match from other playsets). The loading times for loading up new playset worlds are RIDICULOUSLY long, and you CANNOT skip cut-scenes (which is EXTREMELY irritating).

Overall, the game is fun, and I can see kids REALLY getting into it as they get to play with their favorite characters from their favorite movies. But, buyer beware, this game and all of its expansions, characters, levels, powers, etc. will cost you A LOT more than just buying a standard boxed video game for $60.

4 stars.
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DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3
DISNEY INFINITY Starter Pack PS3 by Disney Interactive (PlayStation 3)
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