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Showing 1-25 of 47 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 30, 2010 11:29:03 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 30, 2010 11:36:37 AM PDT
Alaedin K. says:
I absolutely refuse to buy this game for the pc. I am also really discouraged to even buy the console version. I own both Assassin's Creed 1 and 2 and love both very much. I have always loved and admired Ubisoft for their amazing games including my beloved Prince of Persia series, but this "Internet connection required at all times" will not fly.

If you value or respect your rights as a consumer who is giving their hard earned money to Ubisoft with this ridiculous restriction and stipulation, I advise you to stay away from this game and any other that mandates you have a constant connection to their servers. We as consumers have rights and we should exercise these rights by boycotting this product until these ridiculous limitations are removed. If you must buy Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood, buy the console version. Let's make a statement to Ubisoft and the video game industry as a whole. They need our HARD EARNED money to survive. We don't need your games to survive. There will be others that will make games with the consumers rights in mind.

Posted on Aug 2, 2010 7:18:50 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 2, 2010 7:24:00 PM PDT
Good message. However, please note that the PC version of Assassin's Creed 2 also uses this draconian DRM -- it just doesn't say it on the box.

On Amazon.com, please tag the PC versions of Assassin's Creed 2 and Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood, as well as any other games that use this draconian DRM, with the following 3 tags:

digital restrictions management
drm
defectivebydesign

Posted on Aug 5, 2010 10:56:16 AM PDT
Bob Dafter says:
I seriously wonder what the heck is going through the people's minds at Ubisoft. They would probably do better not releasing it rather than doing this. Would save them time and money. Unless there is a motive we don't see to this constant connection.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2010 11:41:17 AM PDT
Alaedin K. says:
I truly believe that they are trying to get to the point where they will eventually force owners of console copies to register them online so that will put an end to the ability to resell your copy. They will of course claim "Ohh we aren't making money due to people making illegal copies and such" to divert your attention from their true agenda, that is to make sure any and every single person who ever plays their games must have purchased their own unregistered copy. Take Dragon Age Origins for the PS3 for example. Did you know that you must register with EA(R) to access online content? It doesn't require you to register your copy or have constant online access YET, but I seriously see them taking a huge step in that direction. Maybe I'm an over imaginative theorist, or maybe I just finally see a pattern that the general public usually oversees due to malice corporate tactics.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 11, 2011 10:39:29 AM PST
Jaws says:
That's good to know, however, I fail to see why your video game experience should be ruined just on principle. I have Steam, which requires internet. I reside in a house where that doesn't always happen. I still get by just fine.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2011 7:46:56 PM PST
Steam has an offline mode though.

I am greatly looking forward to learning where the devs take the story in Brotherhood; however, I will probably buy it for cheaper when a crack is out. I have a permanent internet connection but this kind of bs is still unacceptable.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2011 9:21:55 PM PST
Alaedin K. says:
You do realize that with this DRM you technically don't own the copy of software that you purchased. EA(R) now requires you to register your copy of a game with unique codes to access online content such as multiplayer. That's on consoles now! What's to stop them from making you register a game in its entirety to play even without online content. All I'm saying is what they are doing is wrong. Why should I have to have a constant connection to the internet if it is not necessary to play a single player game. its just not right. I don't care what anyone says.

Posted on Feb 14, 2011 7:17:10 PM PST
I'm generally always connected to the internet. Because of that, I really don't care about this DRM. More importantly, if we DON'T buy this game, then what will ensue will most likely be Ubisoft not giving a crap about the PC community (just like Activision) and not releasing games on PC at all. I don't know about you, but that is terrifying.

Posted on Feb 15, 2011 2:12:04 AM PST
M. MacMahon says:
1) Buy game to own it and support PC ports from Ubisoft.

2) Crack game to play offline and own it forever.

3) Win.

Posted on Feb 15, 2011 10:19:31 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 15, 2011 10:25:39 AM PST
I actually hate Steam as well.

"Steam has an offline mode though."

Yes, but it still requires you to get Internet permission from Valve every time you install a game. And you may have to re-install the game from time to time and/or install it on a new computer.

"You do realize that with this DRM you technically don't own the copy of software that you purchased."

Good point, and that is true of Steam as well. Here is a quote from the Steam Subscriber Agreement:

"All title, ownership rights and intellectual property rights in and to the Software and any and all copies thereof are owned by Valve and/or its licensors."

The argument about Ubisoft Online Services requiring the Internet connection to be constant is actually a weak point. In the near future, Internet access will be universal. The fundamental problems with Ubisoft Online Services -- which are also true of Steam -- are that it turns owning into renting and give a single company an outrageous level of control over use of products.

"Buy game to own it and support PC ports from Ubisoft."

Don't buy the game. That will support this DRM.

Here is a very good article about Steam:

http://greatemerald.xmpcommunity.com/index.php/articles/general-articles/103-steam-subscriber-agreement-controversy.html

Posted on Feb 15, 2011 12:27:04 PM PST
nk says:
Let me be the devil's advocate here. At least UBI DRM does not have install limit and comes with cloud saving. UBI DRM does not forces you to install malwares like steam and gfwl on your system. Only the games which have steamworks integration come with cloud saving where as all the UBI DRM games have them. I am more inclined for a publisher side saving rather than retailer side saving. And why does it matter that steam has an offline mode. I believe the offline mode is not in-definate and I think it can only be activated for up to 30 days. How does it make all right after 30 days to have constant internet DRM???

Amazon has game DL service and they dont enforce their DRM. And I can dl and install my game anywhere.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 15, 2011 3:31:22 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 15, 2011 3:45:41 PM PST
"At least UBI DRM does not have install limit and comes with cloud saving."

UBI DRM does not have install limit, just gives a single company 1984-like control over use of products.

But you're right to criticize Steam.

"I believe the offline mode is not in-definate and I think it can only be activated for up to 30 days."

From what I've read, Steam's offline mode is not time limited. But who cares. It still requires you to get Internet permission every time you install a game, which Valve is under no legal obligation to give.

Both Steam and Ubisoft Online Services are digital distribution systems that exist as an excuse for their DRM. Their purpose is to take away our freedom, while offering minor benefits to distract us from what we lose.

I personally would never consider it worth giving up my rights over a product I buy just to have the convienence of digital distribution.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2011 7:55:28 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Feb 16, 2011 4:37:26 PM PST]

Posted on Feb 16, 2011 9:30:30 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Feb 16, 2011 9:31:06 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2011 9:34:55 AM PST
You're obviously a troll.

Posted on Feb 16, 2011 12:49:45 PM PST
Alaedin K. says:
I second that Matthew! This guy is as goofy as they get. I'm as a hardcore gamer as they get, but I am also very intellectual. You're reasoning is absolutely absurd Azari. I have built an entertainment center from the ground up. I own and have spent THOUSANDS of dollars on games, consoles, home theatre system, tv, and my pc. I mean literally thousands (est. $15,000-$20,000). I have well over 250 current console (Xbox 360, PS3, Wii) and pc games. If I could show you my track record of Amazon purchases, I would. I spent over $2000 on my PC alone specifically for gaming purposes. Who the hell is to tell me I don't own what I bought. Where is your reasoning!! I don't care for your unreasonable reasoning. I paid for it. It's my property to use when, where, and how I want.

Posted on Feb 18, 2011 10:32:07 PM PST
P. Marla says:
FYI, for anyone still reading this, the DRM has been mostly removed from both AC 2 and AC:B. You only have to log in at the beginning of the game -- after that, you can disconnect the internet and keep playing.
Also, AC:B is releasing March 17th (US) and 18th (UK). Cheers!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2011 10:13:53 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 19, 2011 10:23:40 AM PST
I wouldn't call that "mostly removing" it.

It still gives a single company 1984-like control over use of products.

But then again, Steam does too.

See my earlier posts.

Posted on Feb 19, 2011 12:05:30 PM PST
P. Marla says:
I would. The main complaint was that people would be unable to play the game in places with bad internet access -- now, as long as they can access the internet for a few minutes in the beginning, they can play for however long they want.

Also, seeing as how this is a young franchise, it will be a long time before they decide that nobody's playing anymore and close down their servers -- and apart from that, there is no other instance of '1984-like control'.
I really don't think one login is unreasonable considering:
a) Offline gameplay
b) All progress saved online
c) Game can be installed, and/or resumed from any computer in nearly any part of the world.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2011 9:38:54 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 20, 2011 9:41:26 PM PST
"The main complaint was that people would be unable to play the game in places with bad internet access -- now, as long as they can access the internet for a few minutes in the beginning, they can play for however long they want."

That wasn't the only main complaint. Another of the main complaints was that it turns owning into renting.

I really don't think that the "benefits" are significant at all.

"Offline gameplay"

In no way, shape, or form does this system enable offline gameplay. It is a LIMITER of that, not the enabler.

"All progress saved online"

BIG DEAL. I'm perfectly happy with saving on my computer.

"Game can be installed, and/or resumed from any computer in nearly any part of the world."

That would also be true without this system, assuming that you had the game disc and a flash drive containing saved data. And without this system, you would be able to do that without ever needing to get Internet permission.

There is one fundamental fact about this system that reveals it's true nature:

Ubisoft FORCES users to use it.

Ubisoft isn't stupid. They know that many people object to this system. If they truely had users' interests in mind, they would make this system optional. But the fact that they force users to use this system in order to be able to play the game at all is outrageous and shows that the true purpose of this system is to take away users' freedom, while offering minor benefits to distract them from what they lose.

Posted on Feb 23, 2011 3:42:37 AM PST
As of today Ubisoft confirmed that the DRM has been dropped for Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood. After initial login a internet connection is not required.

Posted on Feb 24, 2011 8:22:40 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 24, 2011 8:23:42 PM PST
"As of today Ubisoft confirmed that the DRM has been dropped for Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood."

Yeah. Sure. :)

Read my previous messages.

In it's early days, Steam required Internet verification every time a game was started, as Ubisoft Online Services does NOW -- and people were shocked by it.

Here is a quote from Game Revolution's review of Half-Life 2:

[start of quote]

Steam is the first genuine attempt at digital distribution by any major game developer, and while we here at Game Revolution love praising people for trying new things, we don't like those new things rammed down our throats. If you purchase the retail version (as in the version where you legally buy a box from the store, take it home and install it), expect to wait a good two hours from the point where you start the install to where you actually play the game. Also, you better be able to connect to the Internet; otherwise, you won't be playing any of it at all, including the entire single-player game. Half-Life 2 is locked until you've successfully logged into Steam, set up a user account, and verified that your copy is legitimate.

And that doesn't happen just during install, either. Every time you launch Half-Life 2, even just to play single player, the game will launch the Steam service, check your Internet connection, verify your copy, and even download updates, all without asking for your okay.

As a gamer who likes to have absolute control over the information that comes into my system, this whole thing drives me crazy. When I want to play a single-player game, I really don't care if Steam is fully updated or not. Why is it okay for a game company to do this? What if every game company follows Valve's lead and does this to their games? Will my EA launcher conflict with my Eidos launcher? Will my bandwidth be consumed by extra software that constantly verifies software that I legitimately own? And what happens if/when Valve decides Steam is no longer useful and disconnects the service? So many questions, and so few answers. It's easy to see why Valve would freak out after the countless hacking attempts that interrupted the game's development, but their paranoia (or Vivendi's - who knows anymore?) has led to a game so difficult to simply turn on and play that even hardcore PC users will be irritated by the number of hoops they are required to jump through.

[end of quote]

There are a number of destructive tactics that companies have used to force or manipulate people into accepting DRM. I think that these companies intentionally made these systems worse at first to make them then seem not as bad.

Posted on Feb 24, 2011 8:54:59 PM PST
P. Marla says:
So what?
As hard as it seems to be for you to accept, there will ALWAYS be DRM because companies will always try to minimize the effects of piracy. The only choice here is between relatively unobtrusive DRM (like Ubisoft's initial login) and clunky, hamfisted DRM (eg., limited number of installs / limited number of devices you can install on, Sony's infamous CD rootkits, etc.). Going on long rants about Steam will not magically get us a third option of no drm.

In fact, googling the issue will bring up a number of gaming websites which clearly agree with my logic, since they nearly all term it 'removing the DRM'.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 25, 2011 2:47:17 PM PST
Sam says:
What do you mean "Yeah. Sure. *dumbass' smiley face*"?
It's straight from Ubisoft, confirmed and not BS.

+ HL2 can be run through Steam while it's in offline mode after the initial online verification, moron. It's one of the most effective and convenient DRMs out there. Open up your narrow mind and maybe you'll learn something.

Stop making a big deal outta game devs/publishers & DRM. If you hate them yet ironically love their games so much, either deal with it or pirate 'em and stfu.

Posted on Feb 25, 2011 4:36:29 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 26, 2011 1:18:05 PM PST]
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Participants:  25
Total posts:  47
Initial post:  Jul 30, 2010
Latest post:  Jul 26, 2011

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