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2
votes
Don't worry much about the accessories. All the accessories you have mentioned and any that are necessary will come with the nikon d90 or canon 40d. If you would like to buy the canon 40d I recommend buying it body only plus the 18-200 lens. This lens will provide you with a perfect single lens solution. But, if you would want to travel the d90 path, the 18-105 dx vr lens will also provide a good solution to your needs. The durability of ~$1000 dSLRs are unquestionably well built. Although the 40d may seem better due to its solid magnesium alloy construction, both the 40d and the d90 are built to last and will definitely survive way past your next upgrade :). This post may seem bias for the canon 40d, but I actually believe the d90 is most definitely superior to the canon 40d due to several reasons. -Live view screen has a much higher resolution, 920k pixels compared to canon's 240k. This allows you to save time because with the Nikon you can tell if you took a good picture quickly using the live view while the canon's live view may be hard to decipher/see. -D90 also comes with a movie mode. Something you might not need but good for occasional needs. -the D90 also takes better pictures in low light due to its higher iso capability. In Conclusion: Basically, the nikon d90 exceeds the canon 40d in all aspects except for their continuous shooting speeds. This is where canon shines at a godlike 6.5 frames per second. But in the end, the nikon wins due to all of it's great features and user-friendliness =]. "Nikon D90 offers its HD movie recording capability, contrast-detect autofocus in Live View mode, a couple of extra megapixels, one stop higher maximum ISO, the snazzy viewfinder with on-demand gridlines, its extensive in-camera RAW file processing, the automatic CA correction, and the direct, in-camera support for Nikon's wireless lighting system. On its side of the ledger, though, the EOS-40D offers faster continuous-mode shooting, at 6-6.4 frames/second, depending on the shooting mode, vs 4.5 for the D90. The Canon 40D also has 14-bit internal processing, a PC-type sync terminal for connecting to external flash systems, and full-capability RAW processing software included in the box. The D90 still sports more features, but the 40D's higher continuous-mode shooting speed and 14-bit processing might sway some users in its favor. A closer contest than that with the XSi, but the scales still seem to tip toward the D90. If you find the Canon 40D a compelling bargain, though, our advice is to move fast, as the 40Ds remaining in the market are likely to sell through quickly." - http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D90/D90A.HTM "Nikon D90: In the Box The Nikon D90 kit ships with the following items in the box: * Nikon D90 body * AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED VR Lens * Body cap * Front lens cap * Camera strap * Rubber eyecup * USB cable * Quick charger (MH-18a) * AC power cord * Li-ion battery (EN-EL3e) * Accessory shoe cover * Plastic LCD protector panel * PictureProject CD ROM * Quick start guide * Instruction manual * Warranty and registration card " - http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D90/D90A.HTM
Dec 24, 2008 by Barry He
1
vote
This will help: http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Nikon_D90/verdict.shtml
Oct 10, 2008 by E. J. Weigold
1
vote
I was told to use this card to keep up speed of clicks between pics and better video San Disk Extreme III SDHC 8 GB card (just bought the $31 + $5 shipping one from blue proton but it's now like $38 - same one I just bought (I think) at Circuit city was $79.
Dec 6, 2008 by Bonham
1
vote
I have to respectfully disagree with the recommendation for a 16-85mm VR. I have that lens, use it with my D90 and it's great for outdoor situations. Indoors, the 16-85mm is fine if you are using a flash. I can see using the 16-85mm for some interior church shots, but most of wedding shots are going to be of people. things, little details like bouquets, etc. You will want a lens that can handle low-light and can isolate a subject well (subject in focus - remaining areas blurry). You should check out primes. Fast zooms are nice, but they will defintiley set you back a lot of money. Look into these lenses: 1. Nikkor 50mm 1.8 - The poor man's lens for low light, decent bokeh, depth of field interestingness. $100 Everyone should have at least one fast lens and since this one is cheap, it's a good place to start. 2. Sigma 30mm 1.4 More money, but since it's wider than the above lens, a little more versatile, especially with DX sensor. $300 or more 3. Nikkor 85mm 1.8 - Like the 50mm but is more telephoto, so this is good if you are standing far from your subject but want to fill the frame with your subject. Good for concerts, theater, etc. 5. Nikkor 85mm 1.4 - This is a money-making lens for pro wedding photographers and portrait photographers. People fall in love with and worship this lens. Do a web search and you'll find out why. Very, very pricey. $1K but worth it. One thing about primes is that there is a definite learning curve to using them - especially at the wider apertures since the depth of field is SO narrow. You have to really work on learning to use them to maximize the number of keepers you have. BUT, these fast lenses help you to examine more work more critically, to look at your composition, technique, etc in ways that your kit lens never will :) Good luck with your photography!
Feb 5, 2009 by nnsuch
0
votes
raw vs jpg May 19, 2013
This is a question that deserves an in-depth answer and that you should research. Google your question and you'll find a wealth of information about the differences between the two formats. It will be the best way for you to learn which format works best for your needs.
May 19, 2013 by Vivian S. Bedoya
0
votes
I ordered the d90 kit back in October and it came with the Nikon warranty. Just make sure you purchase the body directly from Amazon, not from a unknown company that's selling it on Amazon.com. I use Amazon.com often, but I'm reluctant to purchase merchandise that's not sold directly by Amazon. Hope this helps.
Nov 30, 2008 by Emi
0
votes
VR is handy in low light when your subject is relatively static because it allows you to shoot with a lower ISO, which theoretically delivers better color, less noise, etc. VR won't help freeze action, however, so your wiggly kids will still look blurry. I have VR on my 16-85mm DX Nikkor, which I only occasionally use indoors without a flash. Also, a basic relationship still exists between focal range and image quality. At a given price point, the lens with the greater range will deliver the poorer results; it's simply more expensive for a manufacturer to engineer the more complex optics and mechanics for a big-range lens, which leaves less money available to finely tune a more simple system. My 16-85mm zoom has notably better image quality than Nikon's 18-200mm, and they're nearly the same price at $600. Along the same line, 3rd-party vendors typically trade-off build quality for image quality. So you can find Sigma, Tamron, or Tokina lenses with pretty nice image quality at prices considerably cheaper than a Nikon or Canon lens, but they aren't built as well. And in the end, yes, a pro Sigma will look cleaner than an amateur Nikon, but the comparable pro Nikon will almost always perform better in every category than the pro Sigma. You get what you pay for.
Mar 2, 2009 by Erik H.
0
votes
As trivial as it may seem, don't skimp on a filter. You have a nice camera, so get a MULTI-COATED filter from someone like B&W, Heliopan, or Hoya. The multi-coatings reduce flare and reflections, just like your multi-coated Nikon lens -- again, don't skimp, it'll truly reduce the quality of your photo's especially in sunlight. The size of the filter should be imprinted on the lens, and yes, it's 67mm. A good filter is somewhere in the $50 neighborhood.
Mar 23, 2009 by Erik H.
0
votes
well i do not know becuase i have purchased this camer long time ago. but i think what you have mentioned is included i believe is the software
Dec 23, 2013 by Ahmed M. Al Sayyed
0
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I think amazon should include manufacturer information for all its products: "made in ___"
Jul 14, 2011 by Isabella's
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