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Da Last Don Explicit Lyrics


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Audio CD, Explicit Lyrics, June 2, 1998
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Mp Da Last Don
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 2, 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • Label: Priority Records/No Limit
  • ASIN: B000006ON3
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (190 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #105,747 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Da Last Don
2. Till We Dead And Gone
3. Thinkin' Bout U
4. Soldiers, Riders, And G's
5. The Ghetto's Got Me Trapped
6. Get Your Paper
7. Ride
8. Thug Girl
9. These Streets Keep Me Rollin'
10. Black And White
See all 14 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. More 2 Life
2. Ghetto Life
3. Gangsta B...
4. So Many Souls Deceased
5. Rock-A-Bye Haters
6. Snitches
7. Family Business
8. Let's Get Em'
9. Goodbye To My Homies
10. Welcome To My City
See all 15 tracks on this disc

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Despite claims to the contrary, most rappers don't retire; "final" albums are more marketing ploy than graceful bow. Inevitably, as in the case of also-"retired" Too $hort, the artist resurfaces, either not content with the easy life on the other side of the mic or, more likely, still desirous of the guaranteed platinum sales a few generic songs can produce. Master P, in his alleged swan song, gives us all that and more, producing a double-length album that is perhaps the paradigmatic LP of the No Limit sound, replete with the oft-resuscitated tropes of gangsta rap and delivered over the slick formulas of the Beats by the Pound team. --Jon Caramanica

Review

...[B]eyond a Tupac-influenced timbre and semi-autobiographical tales of ghetto life and business struggles, P doesn't have much to offer as a stylist or lyricist. -- Spin

A double CD, MP Da Last Don is the clearest manifestation yet of Percy "Master P" Miller's transition from regional ghetto celebrity to mainstream pop icon. As such, it succeeds in encompassing all of Master P's marketing savvy: distinctively gaudy packaging, familiar hooks and choruses, and collaborations with his platinum-selling No Limit roster ... Master P remains strictly independent and strictly ghetto. -- Vibe

Customer Reviews

Master P did it all on this album, his best cd i have heard.
Wilke
It pains me to see this album do well when there are so many underground guys out there doing it so much better.
Alton Hitchcock, Jr.
With cool guest like Snoop, Silkk, C-Murder and more this is the best.
DEMENTO444@aol.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M.C. Ol' Skool on June 23, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This was supposed to be P's last album and I wish it was. There were a lot of problems with this album: (1) a double album, which was the style of 1998, with only two good songs on it ("Hot Boys & Girls", "Solders, Riders & G's"), (2) No Limit Records were putting out albums faster than Mickey D's serves burgers and with the usual guest stars on this album (virtually the whole No Limit roster) on every single song, you couldn't tell the difference between this album and, say, a Skull Duggery album. (3) is that Master P was starting to sound too much like 2Pac (like most rappers around that time). For Master P's good stuff, check out Ghetto D, 99 Ways to Die, Ice Cream Man or TRU's True or Tru to Da Game.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I don't know why i bought this album, but i really wish i hadn't. I don't know what's more wack, master p's voice, or all the other people on the c.d. It's like they are all trying to save a lost cause. Compared to silk the shocker though master p is the greatest rapper in the world!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 7, 1999
Format: Audio CD
this cd as well as all of master ps cds are the bomb!!!!!!this has really good tracks that any one can relate to. mater p is the best rapper along with his label no limit records. please buy this cd i have all of master ps cds and u will luv it!!!!!!!!!!!!!also look for ghetto dope. thanks for ur time!!!!!!!!!!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 5, 1999
Format: Audio CD
It's sad to see a another generation of possibly potential rap artists go bust and embarress the enormous world of Rap Music. Master P and his No Limit Records recording artists, the No Limit Soldiers, have obviously shown one real accomplishment through all these years of struggle with music... and that is they can make a huge amount of records every year with very little money that founded them. Anyone would think that the No Limit production would be smoother, cleaner, and more over... advanced by now since they've been in the business for some time! Every album gets weaker and weaker and that's the worst of it for Master P because it sounded bad enough in the beginning with the earlier albums. The odds would be greater since their roster of rappers extends every year but still doesn't give them any hope. Snoop's addition does very little since his first No Limit album did worse than his last Death Row Album! Snoop's Topp Dogg album did well only because of the Long Beach help!! So back to the beginning, the Last Don should have been the last album for No Limit altogether! It's a regular album with a bunch of artists trying to be featuring on every track, again. Nice try Master P but your No Limit's limit had expired a long time ago..........
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Evan Streb on December 12, 1999
Format: Audio CD
My main problem with Mr. P (aside from the fact that every one of his songs "Features" somebody else) is the unbelievable sense of him repeating himself after every dang song. There is NOTHING in this whole album that we haven't heard before, so why bother spending TWENTY SEVEN DOLLARS for it! The problem with rap is that today all these kids are stealing one hook from one piece of music ("Sampling" if you will) from the seventies and eighties. Sooooo... what's a rapper to do ten years from now when everybody's sampling music from the nineties? It'll still be the music of the seventies and eighties! Sampling worked in stuff like "Paul's Boutique" because that had so many of them that it didn't exploit just one particular hook. Ever heard Will Smith's new song "Willennium". Okay. Will knows that all he has to do to make a hit record is sample nice melody from an old song no teenagers have ever heard before (in this case "Rock the Casbah" by The Clash), loop it, and then rap over and then BOOM! He'll make a million dollars!
Anyway, this album sucks. We've heard it all before. How many damn 2Pac or Biggie tributes do we need?
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Rupert on December 3, 2002
Format: Audio CD
With 1997 releases like Ghetto D, Charge It 2 Da Game and Unpredictable, No Limit was being hailed as one of the dopest record labels around. Back then it seemed like nobody had more fury than Mystikal, nobody could tongue-twist a verse better than Silkk the Shocker, and you just couldn't TOUCH Mia X. But after a while people started to realize that all the No Limit albums pretty much sounded the same, but at least they were still pretty good. Master P seemed to be on top of the world, so he decided to give the people what they wanted: a double dose of him and his crew; also, he announced that this would be his last solo album. But would MP Da Last Don be the album to keep No Limit Records on top of their game?
The answer is no. Even diehard No Limit fans knew that after one listen of this two-disc set. The album is filled with mostly overused ideas, and even though P was never really an impressive lyricist, the lyrics still seem watered-down after the Ghetto D phenomenon. In fact, there are only two songs really worth listening to on the whole set: "Soldiers, Riders, and G's" and "Snitches". Both songs feature Snoop Dogg (who was new to the label), and he rips up those songs so well that you don't even care about the lyrics that P and the other guest stars spit.
"Make `Em Say Ugh 2" is okay (though the skit was hilarious), and "Thug Girl" was pretty good, but nothing else really stands out. There is an obligatory "Is There A Heaven For A Gangsta"-esque song ("Goodbye To My Homies"), and "Thinkin' Bout U" featured Mia X doing some off-key singing over off-key piano licks.
After this lackluster album, Master P decided he wasn't going to retire after all, but I'm not sure if anyone cared. Because no one rushed to the store to buy Silkk the Shocker's Made Man, Mercedes' Rear End (sorry to remind you of that), or even Mystikal's Ghetto Fabulous. I guess it's true what they say: what goes up must come down.
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