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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent production.
Witty, fast paced, riddled with riddles and very clever.
Not as grim as "Game of Thrones": it actually reminds me of "Shakespeare in love" sometimes, but in a good way.
Don't expect "History Channel's" accuracy - this is entertainment around Da Vinci's life and achievements. No more, no less.
Still, I just can't stress how deep and clever this series...
Published 17 months ago by J. M. Castelo

versus
30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Terrible, Not Great. Certainly Worth Watching, Perhaps Not Owning (Contains Spoilers)
I'm quite conflicted about this show. I watched it all, and for the most part enjoyed it, but definitely not without reservations. Let's get to it!

The Good:
- Premise: Da Vinci is one of history's most interesting characters... and frankly it's a brave choice. The basic idea is that the Da Vinci we all know from history is indeed an...
Published 14 months ago by Raoul Ortega


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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent production., May 8, 2013
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Witty, fast paced, riddled with riddles and very clever.
Not as grim as "Game of Thrones": it actually reminds me of "Shakespeare in love" sometimes, but in a good way.
Don't expect "History Channel's" accuracy - this is entertainment around Da Vinci's life and achievements. No more, no less.
Still, I just can't stress how deep and clever this series manages to be.
Expect nudity, erotic moments, gay relationships and violence - a formula Starz is very familiar with (at least) since Spartacus.
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46 of 50 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Written/directed by the guy who wrote Batman Begins, April 23, 2013
By 
C. Johnson (Washington DC) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 (DVD)
If that's not enough to get you interested the mix of history and fiction is excellent. The use of da Vinci's drawings add to the visual representation.

Word of warning: I recommended this to a coworker who also likes GoT and TrueBlood and he (and his wife) were really turned off by the homosexual plot lines. For others it may be a selling point. For historians it simply happened.

Hopefully the set will include a making of 30 min that aired on British TV, it adds some background and perspective (two things da Vinci would have appreciated). One thing David Goyer noted was an intetional choice to cast British actors who American's may not be as familiar with.
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65 of 76 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For openers: History is a Lie, April 14, 2013
By 
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 (DVD)
And so another extended series based on historical data begins and oddly enough the other series set in the same time frame, THE BORGIAS, is similar to the decadent feeling established by the first episode of DA VINCI'S DEMONS. The writers and directors of this series of eight episodes vary from week to week and so we may have a different opinion with each passing episode. Is the series worth watching? It seems so, if the antics that occur in episode 1 are indicative of the direction.

After a rather hilarious opening with the fully nude Hugh Bonneville and his male consort preparing to face a new day worried about bowels and other matters - a brief setting as Bonnevile is instantly murdered - we move into Renaissance Florence where the 25 year old artist/engineer/wizard genius Leonardo Da Vinci (Tom Riley) is working on yet another amazing use of flight with his friends Nico (Eros Vlahos) and Zoroaster (Gregg Chillin) and the amiable Verrocchio (Alan Corduner). The young Da Vinci is a lover (with the Medici mistress Lucrezia played by Laura Haddock) because of his talents at portraiture and cunning, an idealist who believes anything is possible if you just think of it. He mixes with the court of the Medicis (Elliot Cowan is Lorenzo) and struggles with his sense of dark demons brought into focus by his visit with Al-Rahim (Alexander Siddig), and is always cognizant of the fact that he is tortured by `a gift of superhuman genius, a heretic intent on exposing the lies of religion, an insurgent seeking to subvert an elitist society, a bastard son who yearns for legitimacy with his father. He finds himself in the midst of a storm that has been brewing for centuries - a conflict between truth and lies, religion and reason, past and future. His aspirations are used against him by the opposing forces of the time-luring him into a game of seduction where those who despise his intellect need him most. Leonardo must take up the fight against foes who use history to suppress the truth. A hero armed only with genius, Da Vinci stands alone against the darkness within, and the darkness without. Facing an uncertain future, his quest for knowledge nearly becomes his undoing as he explores the fringes of his own sanity. Da Vinci throws himself into his genius and emerges as an unstoppable force that lifts an entire era out of darkness and propels it into light. His story becomes a mirror into our own world, calling us all to join his fight to Free the Future.' This latter portion is provided by the PR for the series.

The scenery is magnificent, the drawings of Da Vinci come wonderfully to life through this episode, and the innumerable subplots are at times hinted and at other times well started. It seems as though all this will work for at least 8 episodes! Grady Harp, April 13
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Terrible, Not Great. Certainly Worth Watching, Perhaps Not Owning (Contains Spoilers), August 1, 2013
By 
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 (DVD)
I'm quite conflicted about this show. I watched it all, and for the most part enjoyed it, but definitely not without reservations. Let's get to it!

The Good:
- Premise: Da Vinci is one of history's most interesting characters... and frankly it's a brave choice. The basic idea is that the Da Vinci we all know from history is indeed an artist/inventor/genius, but also deeply involved in the political intrigue of the day. Given how little is known about his early day-to-day life, it makes sense that they've expanded his role a bit to incorporate him into known political happenings of late 15-century Florence. It's an interesting period most people aren't very familiar with, so I'm all about it.

- Over-Arching Plot: Why not just say "plot"? Because sadly plot will be featured in "The Bad" section below. However, the overall plot, the story of what drives Leonardo, I find somewhat compelling. Leonardo is essentially looking for his long-lost mother, who he can't remember at all. This search leads him in some super-natural directions and his quest for his mother becomes intertwined with a quest for the "book of leaves"... which I assume will be explained later. This is all fantasy of course, but I like it. No problems at all here.

- Production: I'm kind of lumping a lot of smaller things in here. I think the acting was just fine and the casting was well done. I even like the opening music, which occasionally forces its way into the episode. When trying to illustrate moments of genius they basically start drawing things on the screen in the style of Leonardo's famous etchings. This is a little weird, but certainly unique and it grew on me.

The Bad:
- Plot: I'm referring more to the episode-by-episode plot. It's very formulaic, especially for the first part of the season. Some misadventure befalls Florence, commissioner Gordon shines a specially modified spotlight into the night, summoning Da Vinci. He, of course, see's the Mona Lisa symbol in the sky and quickly invents something outrageous out of a pomegranate, a toothpick and a rotting stump... voila, crisis resolved. In some ways it's a 15th century MacGyver. Often episodes focus on these absurd side stories, with little mention of the main plot. This simply doesn't work in an 8-episode season. So the last 3 episodes feel like they just said "oh wow, we should really get on that."

- History: Honestly, I'm completely fine with messing with history for entertainment shows, but they try to incorporate known history, and frankly they often do it badly. They play with time considerably, the show takes place in 1478 (as dated by the historical events in the final episode), or maybe it takes place earlier, as it features Vlad III, who died 4 years earlier than that. It feels at times like they were sitting in a brainstorming session and saying "15th century Europe... what you got?"... to which the replies came, "Um, I don't know much about 15th century Europe... let's see, we got Leonardo, so what else?... OH!... Ferdinand and Isabella, i know Spain isn't really near Italy but we'll work it out... discovery of America, what else?.. Dracula!, that's around then right? *consults encyclopedia* ... yep, Dracula. Romania's only a couple days walk from Florence anyway." This just seems forced to me, and it rubbed me the wrong way.

- The End: Despite the ominous title, fear not, I wont give away the ending. But I will say that it's poorly executed. It's done like a show that planned for 10 episodes but only got 8. In most well-written shows, each season has an over-arching plot (which it has). In the season finale, you wrap up some things to give an audience closure, and you usually end with some kind of cliff-hanger so that people keep paying their $13/month for Starz to see next season. This excels at the latter and utterly fails at the former. It has literally zero closure. Nothing is resolved, not one thing. It's especially surprising given how tidy the individual episodes were. Frankly it's just very disappointing.

Summary: One could easily read this review and conclude I hated the show. Far from it, I liked the characters I was supposed to like and loathed the bad guys. I got invested in the story, and will definitely watch next season. For me though, the wild story tangents, absurd inventions (Leonardo was amazing as is, do we really need to give him credit for discovering America and inventing photography?), and absolutely atrocious ending prevent this from being a great show. It's merely a good show, hovering dangerously-close to mediocre.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new favorite!!!, June 19, 2013
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 (DVD)
Some people won't like this show because it's not historically accurate, but it's a show...of course it won't be historically accurate. It's also a show on Starz therefore ensuring that it's going to be driven by how crazy, sexy, stimulating, and beautiful they can make it...so if you want to watch it with a notepad in your lap to check off how factually correct it is then it is most certainly not for you! Otherwise, this show is going to blow you away! It's extremely interesting, funny, and sexy. I love watching Da Vinci move his fingers back and forth real fast while he's thinking...makes you excited and full of anticipation to know what genius idea or creation he's about to unleash. Game of Thrones is still my top favorite, but this show is definitely my #2 now. I cannot wait for season 2!!! Hope you enjoy!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fanciful Starz Production That's Best Appreciated For Its Fast Paced Escapism And Not For Its Historical Merit, September 5, 2013
The Starz network original production "Da Vinci's Demons" is a show that is sure to engender a mixed reaction. As a slick and polished entertainment, the program is a fun mix of historical personages and rather fanciful plotlines. It is NOT meant to be taken as a literal representation of history or even as a realistic portrait of Leonardo Da Vinci. Instead, it is an over-the-top spectacle set as an adult adventure series. Da Vinci is seen as a savant that can lose touch with the social niceties when obsessed with a current invention or idea. He is selfish, single-minded, and many times quite comical. In an amusing bit of visual flourish, these mental images are often shot in an animated style so that you may get into the madness and genius of Da Vinci from a more visceral viewpoint. Created by David S. Goyer, the screenwriter of the Dark Knight trilogy, "Da Vinci's Demons" shares similar themes as the Batman saga (our hero is even imprisoned with bats in one sequence and uses them to help him escape) but with considerably more humor and outlandishness. I repeat, if you come to "Da Vinci's Demons" expecting to fact check its history and realism--you will be sorely disappointed. But despite its silliness (and it is quite silly at times), I enjoyed this tale of sex, genius, violence, and mysticism designed as an energetic and entertainingly dark romp for adult audiences.

Set in Renaissance era Florence, Da Vinci (the charismatic Tom Riley) is introduced as somewhat of a rogue and ne'er-do-well. Brash, confrontational, and wildly enthusiastic, this is Da Vinci's world and the eccentric genius expects everyone to cater to his needs. And, for the most part, they do! Oftentimes, this is represented in comical fashion and can be quite hilarious. But under the surface, Da Vinci is tortured by visions of an unknown future. He sees grisly spectacles and is chasing down a truth that comes to him through seers, nightmares, and other manner of psychic connection. Also a renowned artist, he becomes intrigued by a local beauty (Laura Haddock) which brings him to the attention of the Medici clan who are the current rulers of Florence. The lass is Lorenzo Medici's (Elliot Cowan) mistress, but she also has ties to the forces of Rome. The land is in a time of political upheaval, you see. Florence is thriving as a rather decadent ideal of freedom and wealth, and the reigning political forces of Rome want to bring it in line. Evil and treachery is epitomized by the villainous Riario (Blake Ritson, seething through every scene) as Rome's unscrupulous henchman. And as war is about to ignite, Da Vinci's unusual brand of genius is often what stands in the way of utter disaster.

The plot of "Da Vinci's Demons" is twisty, violent, and dark. The show is loaded with grisly scenes and copious amounts of nudity (Downton Abbey's Hugh Bonneville has a rather unexpected cameo). It is not a genteel recounting of history, but a bawdy and lurid tale. The villains are bold, the good guys are likable, and Da Vinci is an unpredictable hero. Much of the success of "Da Vinci's Demons" rests on the shoulders of Tom Riley, but it is a difficult and star-making performance. I was always intrigued to see what he might do next. Without his edge, volatility and humor, the program might easily have gone way off course. I certainly liked the peripheral cast, but he is the clear MVP as you must be invested in this central character. The show also benefits from lush production values, effects, visual design, costuming, and musical orchestration. It all feels very expensive and well done. I won't lie, though, there are times where I had to put my brain on hold to fully enjoy the spectacle of it all. In the end, I suspect many will embrace the over-the-top appeal of this thrill ride. Others will be perplexed by its more fanciful air. Forgetting everything else, "Da Vinci's Demons" seeks to be grandly entertaining and I thought it succeeded. KGHarris, 9/13.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "I am a Son of Earth and Starry Heaven...", March 6, 2014
By 
R. M. Fisher "Ravenya" (New Zealand = Middle Earth!) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 (DVD)
How does one even begin to describe this show? Part biography, part historic-political drama, part fabricated conspiracy (cue The Da Vinci Code references), part buddy-comedy, with a smattering of courtroom dramas, supernaturally themed mysteries, and romantic intrigue - heck, there's even room for a guest-starring Vlad Țepeș. Yes, *that* Vlad Țepeș; also known as Count Dracula. In terms of plot, everything but the kitchen sink is packed into "Da Vinci's Demons", so much so that it's nearly impossible to keep track of the myriad of subplots that meander throughout the course of the eight-episode first season.

Perhaps it's best described simply as a fictional account of Leonardo da Vinci's youth: his inventions, his associates, his adventures and his participation in various historical events. Set predominantly in 15th century Florence during the Renaissance, da Vinci is already notorious for his artistic skill, wild ideas, and unorthodox sexual practices. Played by Tom Riley as a sort of hyperactive savant, the viewer occasionally gets glimpses into the way his mind works - when a flock of birds is released, he sees them as moving sketches; when a new idea comes to him, we see the outline of his plan drawn in his mind before it's committed to paper.

He's kind of like what would happen if you combined Tony Stark with Sherlock Holmes - rather selfish, intensely intelligent, somewhat anti-social, and yet immensely attractive *because of* rather than *in spite of* how wrapped up he is in his own little world.

He fits into his current surroundings like a spark does with gunpowder. Florence and its de-facto rulers, the Medici family, are currently under immense pressure from Rome to submit to their control. Lorenzo de' Medici (Elliot Cowan), his brother Giuliano (Tom Bateman) and his wife Clarice (Lara Pulver) are all passionately defensive of Florence's beauty and independence, and forge a rather unlikely alliance with di Vinci in the hopes of maintaining its freedom.

But on a more personal note, da Vinci is on a quest of his own. As the illegitimate son of a notary, he's always been an embarrassment to his father, and knows nothing of his mother save her name: Caterina. Over the course of the season he comes to realize that her disappearance may have something to do with a cult called the Sons of Mithras, whose members encourage him to seek out an artefact known as the Book of Leaves. This is where the inevitable resemblance to The Da Vinci Code kicks in, for Leonardo's journey is filled with hidden clues strewn throughout various books, paintings, sculptures and architecture.

I think even fans of the show would concede that the balancing act between these two plots is somewhat clumsy. The wider political intrigue and the cult storylines seldom intersect, and since both vie for screen-time it's difficult to decide which of the two should be considered the focus of the show. Furthermore, the two are so different in content and tone that I suspect most viewers will end up preferring one over the other - which means that for those interested in the Medici family's struggle to save Florence, Leonardo's obsession with his own past will seem irrelevant, whereas for those drawn into the mystery of the cult will wonder why so much time is being spend on political matters elsewhere. The cult storyline is embroiled in mysticism that doesn't really mesh with the overarching theme of rationality and science, giving one the feeling that the show wants to cherry-pick the "exoticism" of eastern cults but also commend the "enlightenment" of western civilization. In other words, it wants to have its cake and eat it too.

That's not even getting into the various subplots involving Leonardo's dalliance with Lorenzo's mistress (Laura Haddock), who has an agenda of her own, but hey - perhaps you'll get lucky and find both plots equally captivating. In its favor, the hectic plots at least ensure that the show is never boring.

As you might have expected from a Starz show, there is plenty of nudity and sex, though in this case male viewers will have more to appreciate - though there is no shortage of young naked women, the men who get their clothes off are invariably not quite as pleasing to the eye. There's also been some controversy concerning da Vinci's sexuality, for although the man himself is strongly believed to have been gay (though there's always room for debate), here he's best described as mildly bi-curious. All his love scenes are with women, and it's easy to feel as though some erasure has gone on - which is a shame. If any channel could have green-lit a program spearheaded by an openly gay main character, surely it would have been Starz.

Finally, be warned that there's hardly any attempt to adhere to history accuracy - though you only need to glimpse the astounding outfits of the women to realize that. Though some famous events are touched upon (and the Pazzi Conspiracy makes up the greater part of the last two episodes), the show is content to work with its own rules and more-or-less make things up as it goes.

So it all adds up to a rather disjointed show - though I'd personally rather watch something that takes risks and tries new things than treads the same familiar paths. I enjoyed da Vinci's little collection of comrades (sardonic Zoroaster, long-suffering Nicco, free-spirited Vanessa), the occasional nod to history, and the creative costumes, set design and general visual style. I mentioned at the start of this review that even Vlad Țepeș pops in for a guest-starring role, but as it happens Paul Rhys puts in a chilling performance as the famous prince, making it one of the best portrayals of the famous figure in recent memory.

One of the central themes is that of reason, logic and light overcoming superstition, but also a celebration of debauchery, creativity and sexual freedom over that which seeks to stifle and control - and in its boundless energy and originality, "Da Vinci's Demons" is a pretty perfect encapsulation of both these outlooks.
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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars magnificent, April 14, 2013
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Possessing neither cable television nor, in fact, a television, I was still able to catch the premiere episode for free on Starz's website. Unfortunately I won't be able to see anymore until the Blu-ray is released. Even so, I was able to summon enough of an opinion from several viewings of the first episode to form a sufficient review, which I shall surely update once I've watched the entire season. For the moment I can write that, initially at least, Da Vinci's Demons is utterly, shockingly, delightfully absorbing. As a historical fantasy set in Renaissance Italy it is roughly contemporaneous with Showtime's The Borgias, which would seem to make one robust competition for the other. Rather to my surprise, the debut series puts The Borgias to shame. This has less to do with differences in budget--while I cannot know which show has the greater and which the lesser, I suspect The Borgias is slightly ahead of Da Vinci's Demons--and more to do with the quality of the scripts. For all its sumptuous production value The Borgias suffers from writing which, while competent, is decidedly unremarkable, consisting of very spare dialogue which too often the actors, by attempting to make the most of it, stretch painfully thin. Not so with Da Vinci's Demons. Here is abundance, exuberance, and wit. Repartee is fast-paced and charming. Gravitas is measured without sounding inflated. The appearance of the dire phrase, "Believe in yourself," was enough to disrupt the harmony. But, that being the only false note, the writing was, to my ear, uniformly excellent. And there was nothing in the production which failed to captivate.

These are my impressions, gathered as they are from a mere taste. And yet, for me, that taste is definitive.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fanciful Starz Production That's Best Appreciated For Its Fast Paced Escapism And Not For Its Historical Merit, September 5, 2013
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
The Starz network original production "Da Vinci's Demons" is a show that is sure to engender a mixed reaction. As a slick and polished entertainment, the program is a fun mix of historical personages and rather fanciful plotlines. It is NOT meant to be taken as a literal representation of history or even as a realistic portrait of Leonardo Da Vinci. Instead, it is an over-the-top spectacle set as an adult adventure series. Da Vinci is seen as a savant that can lose touch with the social niceties when obsessed with a current invention or idea. He is selfish, single-minded, and many times quite comical. In an amusing bit of visual flourish, these mental images are often shot in an animated style so that you may get into the madness and genius of Da Vinci from a more visceral viewpoint. Created by David S. Goyer, the screenwriter of the Dark Knight trilogy, "Da Vinci's Demons" shares similar themes as the Batman saga (our hero is even imprisoned with bats in one sequence and uses them to help him escape) but with considerably more humor and outlandishness. I repeat, if you come to "Da Vinci's Demons" expecting to fact check its history and realism--you will be sorely disappointed. But despite its silliness (and it is quite silly at times), I enjoyed this tale of sex, genius, violence, and mysticism designed as an energetic and entertainingly dark romp for adult audiences.

Set in Renaissance era Florence, Da Vinci (the charismatic Tom Riley) is introduced as somewhat of a rogue and ne'er-do-well. Brash, confrontational, and wildly enthusiastic, this is Da Vinci's world and the eccentric genius expects everyone to cater to his needs. And, for the most part, they do! Oftentimes, this is represented in comical fashion and can be quite hilarious. But under the surface, Da Vinci is tortured by visions of an unknown future. He sees grisly spectacles and is chasing down a truth that comes to him through seers, nightmares, and other manner of psychic connection. Also a renowned artist, he becomes intrigued by a local beauty (Laura Haddock) which brings him to the attention of the Medici clan who are the current rulers of Florence. The lass is Lorenzo Medici's (Elliot Cowan) mistress, but she also has ties to the forces of Rome. The land is in a time of political upheaval, you see. Florence is thriving as a rather decadent ideal of freedom and wealth, and the reigning political forces of Rome want to bring it in line. Evil and treachery is epitomized by the villainous Riario (Blake Ritson, seething through every scene) as Rome's unscrupulous henchman. And as war is about to ignite, Da Vinci's unusual brand of genius is often what stands in the way of utter disaster.

The plot of "Da Vinci's Demons" is twisty, violent, and dark. The show is loaded with grisly scenes and copious amounts of nudity (Downton Abbey's Hugh Bonneville has a rather unexpected cameo). It is not a genteel recounting of history, but a bawdy and lurid tale. The villains are bold, the good guys are likable, and Da Vinci is an unpredictable hero. Much of the success of "Da Vinci's Demons" rests on the shoulders of Tom Riley, but it is a difficult and star-making performance. I was always intrigued to see what he might do next. Without his edge, volatility and humor, the program might easily have gone way off course. I certainly liked the peripheral cast, but he is the clear MVP as you must be invested in this central character. The show also benefits from lush production values, effects, visual design, costuming, and musical orchestration. It all feels very expensive and well done. I won't lie, though, there are times where I had to put my brain on hold to fully enjoy the spectacle of it all. In the end, I suspect many will embrace the over-the-top appeal of this thrill ride. Others will be perplexed by its more fanciful air. Forgetting everything else, "Da Vinci's Demons" seeks to be grandly entertaining and I thought it succeeded. KGHarris, 9/13.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing, But Confusing, August 30, 2013
This review is from: Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 (DVD)
DA VINCI'S DEMONS is an intriguing cable television series; well acted and boasting rich production values that transport viewers back to Italy of the 1400s.

The first season of the series, consisting of eight one-hour episodes, is a portrait of Leonardo Da Vinci (Tom Riley) as a young man, tortured by the gift of superhuman genius. He lives in an age where he must take up the fight against powerful forces that use history, religion and politics to suppress the truth. Indeed, his quest for knowledge almost becomes his undoing as he explores the fringes of his own sanity.

As worthy as DA VINCI'S DEMONS might be, it does have its problems. Primarily, it deals with a time in European history of which many people, including this writer, are not overly familiar. Therefore, it would have been quite helpful if, at the start of the series, the producers had included some sort of narration or other device that would have put the story we were about to see into context. The series also introduces multiple characters and plot lines so quickly and without explanation that much of the enterprise becomes confusing. One continually wonders who are these characters, what are their relationships and why are they doing what they are doing?

Aside from Riley, the excellent cast of the series includes Laura Haddock, Blake Ritson, Elliot Cowan, Gregg Chillin and Lara Pulver.

DVD extras on the 3-disc set from Anchor Bay Entertainment include audio commentaries by series creator David S. Goyer and several members of the cast, many "Behind the Scenes" featurettes and deleted scenes.

© Michael B. Druxman
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Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 [Blu-ray]
Da Vinci's Demons: Season 1 [Blu-ray] by Jamie Payne (Blu-ray - 2013)
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