Daddy Longlegs 2010 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(11) IMDb 6.4/10
Available in HD

A bittersweet comedy about an unconventional father of two young boys hilariously trying to be a responsible parent - and failing every time.

Starring:
Ronald Bronstein, Sage Ranaldo
Runtime:
1 hour 40 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Daddy Longlegs

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Comedy
Director Ben Safdie, Joshua Safdie
Starring Ronald Bronstein, Sage Ranaldo
Supporting actors Sage Ranaldo, Frey Ranaldo, Victor Puccio, Lance 'Batman' Chamberlain, Baker Suitson, Peter Cramer, Eleonore Hendricks, Sean Price Williams, Dakota Goldhor, Jonny Napalm, Simone Parker, Aren Topdijian, Danny Callahan, Firas Al-Ramahi, Van Neistat, Larry Pelton, Miranda LaPrelle, Emma Peleg
Studio IFC Films
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
"Daddy Longlegs" (retitled, thankfully, from the bizarre "Go Get Some Rosemary") is a tiny indie that seems extremely personal to its makers. A deft look at father love and irresponsibility, there are moments within the film that will surely resonate with anyone who experienced a less than ideal upbringing. I, personally, identified with this underdog story in which you root for the characters--but, ultimately, realize that your investment is futile. Anyone seeking life affirming lessons or tremendous character growth will undoubtedly have to look elsewhere--"Daddy Longlegs" doesn't offer much hope for redemption. It makes a strong case for the power of love, but an equally persuasive argument that sometimes that's just not enough. And while I appreciated much of the film, "Daddy Longlegs" may not be for everyone with its dissection of what makes a family happy as opposed to what is actually healthy.

The movie is owned, quite literally, by Ronald Bronstein. Playing hapless Lenny, the divorced father of two boys who he will have for two weeks of vacation, Bronstein commands the screen with unbridled enthusiasm. Energetic and excited, Lenny is thrilled to reconnect with his boys. Playful as a friend, but not particularly effective as a parent, Lenny has trouble balancing the needs of his children with the demands of work and the pressures of a relationship. Impulsive, and borderline insane, Lenny doesn't comprehend the repercussions of his offbeat choices. And as things start falling apart, his manic energy manifests itself as anger and hostility--and he seems virtually unable to distinguish right from wrong in his increasing desperation. It's a powerhouse performance and Bronstein is ALWAYS a compelling reason to stay connected to "Daddy Longlegs.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Genovese on November 2, 2011
Format: DVD
I first saw this film at a film festival in Tucson. This film has stuck with me since I saw it in November 2010 and I'm super excited to pre-order this film. The couple of other reviews already summarized the film pretty well. The film is semi-autobiographical. Bennie Safdie did a Q&A after the film screened and said that "80% of the film is stuff that actually happened to us" (meaning him and his brother).

I can't get enough of the Safdie brothers. If you like this film, be sure to check out The Pleasure of Being Robbed!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Ellington VINE VOICE on January 5, 2012
Format: DVD
`Daddy Longlegs' reminds me a tad of 2008's `Wendy and Lucy', not in the story but in the overall tone and development. Both films delve into the complex state of internal loneliness and the innate need to find something to bring us closure. Where Wendy had her dog Lucy, and the thought of being separated from her brought her immense internal torment; Lenny has his children.

Lenny is a divorced father of two. He is immature and impulsive. He only gets to see his sons for two weeks out of the year, and he spends those weeks juggling his responsibilities (which he often shrugs aside) with his play time, which includes philandering with strangers and drinking, a lot. `Daddy Longlegs' follows the few weeks he has with his boys and shows the emotional depth Lenny possesses in his person. Lenny is a boy, not yet a man, who doesn't understand how to balance his duty as a father with his innate need to be a friend to his boys. He is careless and insensitive yet protective and loving. He sees his position as `father' as a blessing but he fails to understand that it is also a responsibility. As Lenny shuffles his kids around, handing them off to seemingly perfect strangers so as to carry on with his life as if they weren't there, we can see how the weight of parenthood has not fully rested on this man (possibly because of his overall lack of time spent with them). Still, as impractical as he is, Lenny's love for his children is often displayed with sincerity, keeping this man a rich example of what adolescent parenting can result in (although he is far from a child himself, he surely represents those `youthful' at heart).

The film's largest strength comes in the form of Ronald Bronstein.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Turfseer on February 5, 2011
Format: DVD
[...] This review contains spoilers [...] Watch the film first before reading this [...]

Created by newcomer brothers Ben and Joshua Safdie, 'Daddy Longlegs' was shot on 16 millimeter and has the appearance of a film created in the late 70s (it seems like this is when the film is supposed to take place). It's up for the John Cassavettes Award as part of the independent cinema Spirit Awards in 2011 and reminds one of a Cassavettes film, shot in a cinema verite style, with partially a jazz score underneath. I recently heard the Safdies speak about the film in person and they indicated that it's loosely based on experiences with their father who divorced their mother years ago.

Daddy Longlegs is about a ne'er-do-well by the name of Lenny played by first-time actor Ronald Bronstein. Lenny is divorced from his wife and gets to spend two weeks out of the year with his 7 and 9 year old children, Sage and Frey (played by Sage and Frey Ranaldo in real life). Bronstein remained in character even when not on the set--for example when he visited Sage and Frey at their real school!

Daddy Longlegs is the portrait of a parent who obviously loves his children, but through his irresponsible behavior, ultimately places their lives in jeopardy. When we first meet Lenny, he defensively argues with the school principal who has taken the children out of school for picking fights with other kids. Lenny does crazy things like walking on his hands across the street with the children. After having an argument with his girlfriend, he picks up another woman and goes to bed with her. He then convinces this woman, a virtual stranger, to drive upstate with her boyfriend and brings the kids along on a mini-vacation.

We then experience more examples of bizarre parenting from Lenny.
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