Daddy's Girl and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $7.99
  • Save: $0.80 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Daddy's Girl Mass Market Paperback – January 29, 2008


See all 29 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.19
$0.91 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Daddy's Girl + Dirty Blonde + Final Appeal
Price for all three: $21.57

Buy the selected items together
  • Dirty Blonde $7.19
  • Final Appeal $7.19

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $1.99 (Save 33%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Harper; Reprint edition (January 29, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060833157
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060833152
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (155 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,330 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The undistinguished academic career of Natalie "Nat" Greco, a mousy and naïve law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, takes an unexpected turn at the start of this less than compelling legal thriller from bestseller Scottoline (Dirty Blonde). When an attractive male colleague, Angus Holt, convinces Nat to accompany him on a teaching assignment at a nearby prison, a sudden riot puts them both in peril. Nat finds herself desperately attempting to save the life of a guard, apparently stabbed by an inmate during the fracas. The dying man asks her to pass on his last words to his wife, but possessing knowledge of this cryptic message proves dangerous. Nat finds herself accused of murder and must evade the law while also tracking down the bad guys. Her methods more often resemble that of Nancy Drew than an Ivy League professor, and the plot suffers by comparison with Peter Abrahams's gritty End of Story (2006), which makes better use of a similar theme. 11-city author tour. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Natalie "Nat" Greco's law students just aren't that interested in the history of justice, and she can't seem to find a way to reach them. Then a new teaching opportunity develops that would take her out of the University of Pennsylvania and into a local prison classroom. She opts for the dramatic change of scenery and soon finds herself in the middle of a prison melee, attempting to save the life of an injured prisoner, who makes a dying declaration intended for his wife. In attempting to deliver the bewildering message, Nat nearly gets herself killed and winds up being framed for murder. Ever concerned with justice, Nat goes on the lam as she tries to uncover the mystery of the prisoner's final words. Scottoline mixes stand-alones and her Rosato and Associates series in fairly even proportions, so series fans have learned to expect the occasional interruption. This one finds the author in good form, combining suspense- and character-building effectively. Like her heroine, Scottoline has recently begun to teach at Penn and is also embarking on another new project, a show for Court TV called Murder by the Book, featuring best-selling mystery writers presenting and discussing dramatizations of real-life crimes. She's already immensely popular, but expect the bump in exposure to bump up demand for her latest. Mary Frances Wilkens
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Lisa Scottoline is the New York Times bestselling author of seventeen novels including her most recent, THINK TWICE, and also writes a weekly column, called Chick Wit, for The Philadelphia Inquirer. Lisa has won many honors and awards, notably the Edgar Award, given for excellence in crime fiction, and the Fun Fearless Female Award from Cosmopolitan Magazine. She also teaches a course she created, called Justice and Fiction at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and regularly does speaking engagements. There are twenty-five million copies of her books in print, and she is published in over thirty other countries.Lisa graduated magna cum laude in three years from the University of Pennsylvania, with a B.A. degree in English, and her concentration was Contemporary American Fiction, taught by Philip Roth and others. She graduated cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania Law School. She remains a lifelong resident of the Philadelphia area, where she lives with her array of disobedient pets.

Customer Reviews

I was shocked by the last twists and turns at the very end.
Ann M. Macpherson
The entire book in fact, was a bit boring at one end, and completely over the top at the other.
Christa
Good humor mixed with suspense, twist, and intriguing characters.
K. Hatch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 42 people found the following review helpful By David C. Hackney on March 15, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Lisa Scottoline's 14th novel is much more than a murder mystery. It is the story of a woman, Natalie Greco, transforming herself from a timid young woman dominated by her boyfriend and family, into someone strong, self-assured, and confident whose father proudly proclaims her to be "Daddy's Girl." Within the first few pages Nat "Gnat" will be someone you'll want to spend time with; first out a sense of protectiveness (she's short and is easyly overlooked,) but eventually by telling her "you go girl!" Not only is this an exciting, completely credible work of fiction, Scottoline also gives the reader some of the fascinating history of the Underground Railroad. If you've read her other books you are in for a treat. If you are new to Scottoline this is a great place to start.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By D. West VINE VOICE on April 12, 2007
Format: Hardcover
After reading other books by this author, I must say I was greatly disappointed in this effort. For one, the dialogue was prosaic, the characters weren't all that likeable and the plot was way thin! The use of all caps was an irritating attempt to convey a characteristic that is unlikely (especially in this family) and only served to irritate this reader as it does when one sends emails in all caps to show emphasis.

Past novels by this author have shown a bright wit and great repartee between the characters. This time, these attributes were sorely missing. The heroine, Nat, was not believable in her endeavors and wasn't all that likeable either. It appeared to me that Ms. Scottoline was more interested in getting the book to print, than in creating a credible storyline with interesting characters.

I have read better books by Scottoline. In fact, I just finished Dirty Blonde and because I enjoyed the wit and plot, I bought this one as soon as it was available. I would rather wait longer between "good" novels and get the best Lisa Scottoline has to offer than have her pump out "poorly conceived" novels like an assembly line.

The title was a dud as well and had little to do with the plot. I look forward to better novels in the future as I know the talent is there.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Cathy Goodwin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
As a dedicated Scottoline fan, I enjoyed Daddys Girl immensely. Definitely one of the best in a great series.

Don't blame the author for the title. Ultimately the publisher gets the final word. And when deciding whether to buy this novel, with a highly visible author, do we really look at the title?

Mostly, I found this novel draws on many of Scottoline's recurring themes. For example:

Ordinary woman, extraordinary achievements: As usual, we're introduced to a very down-to-earth, very human heroine who also happens to be an achiever. If anything, Scottoline downplays the sheer magnitude of getting a tenure-track position in an Ivy League law school. She has the all too common worries about keeping up appearance and coping in a male-dominated world. Inside, she's conflicted. Outwardly, she's so accomplished she's scary.

Family: Scottoline's families tend to be large, Italian, loving and possessive. She departs from the profile here, introducing a macho family where the heroine feels like an outsider. Dysfunctional? In Scottoline's novels, whatever happens, blood will trump water anytime.

Outrageous risks: I love watching Scottoline's heroines cross over the edge as they go running from the law. In an earlier novel, a heroine takes over a conference room of a law firm, claiming to be from a branch office. Talk about "Hide in plain sight." Heroine Natalie goes out on a limb here. Alas, I can't say more without being accused of spoilers.

Intricate plot and satisfying ending: Scottoline keeps throwing one curve after another, right up to the end. Experienced mystery readers will get early hunches about the outcome, but it feels right.

Law vs. justice: An ongoing quest among Scottoline's novels.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Fred Camfield on March 26, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Sometimes life makes you feel like you fell down a rabbit's hole, and that you have met the Mad Hatter. Nat Greco is an untenured assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Life is proceeding along somewhat normally until a colleague takes her along to a state correctional facility where he has a program of teaching and legal assistance. A prison riot breaks out. Nat is attacked. People are killed. Suddenly Nat finds herself drawn into a different world.

Something is going down, and Nat finds herself involved. She starts to get nosy, and finds herself falsely accused of murder, set up for unknown reasons. She finds herself on the run. Some people may think that she does stupid things, but her father sums it up when he tells her that she is book smart. She lacks the street smart abilities needed to survive in an urban jungle.

Nat, of course, must survive to get to a blazing finish. But wait, you thought the story ended with chapter 47. Chapter 48 goes in a whole new direction. You should know that the author always puts an unexpected twist at the end of her novels. Do NOT peek ahead. You need to read the entire novel to understand the real ending.

I would note that the author is an adjunct professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, used as the setting for much of the story. The novel is well researched and well written. I think it is the best novel yet by the author.

I believe the meaning of the title is clear. People are trying to direct how she should do things (father knows best), while she is trying to go in her own direction. She has trouble getting people's attention.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?