Tevye the Dairyman and The Railroad Stories and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $3.16 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Tevye the Dairyman and Th... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used book in good condition. This book contains no highlighting or writing. Thank you for looking at this book. Has some wear and tear on the cover The cover is different than shown. There's about an inch long tear in the back cover....taped to prevent further tearing.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Tevye the Dairyman and The Railroad Stories (Library of Yiddish Classics) Paperback – October 1, 1996


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.79
$8.06 $3.84
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.

  • Get a $150 Amazon.com Gift Card: Get the Citi ThankYou® Preferred Card and earn a $150.00 digital Amazon.com Gift Card* after $1,000 in card purchases within 3 months of account opening. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

Tevye the Dairyman and The Railroad Stories (Library of Yiddish Classics) + Tevye the Dairyman and Motl the Cantor's Son (Penguin Classics) + Tevye's Daughters: Collected Stories of Sholom Aleichem
Price for all three: $44.92

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Library of Yiddish Classics
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Schocken (October 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805210695
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805210699
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #142,104 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

With his supple, intelligent translation, Halkin makes accessible the poignant short stories by the legendary Yiddish humorist Sholem Rabinovich (18591916), who wrote under the nom de plume "Sholem Aleichem," a Yiddish salutation. As Halkin elucidates in his introduction, Tevye's self-mocking but deeply affecting monologues (which inspired the play and film Fiddler on the Roof satisfy on several levels: as a psychological analysis of a father's love for his daughters, despite the disappointments they bring him; as a paradigm of the tribulations and resilience of Russian Jewry and the disintegration of shtetl life at the twilight of the Czarist Empire; and as a Job-like theological debate with God. The 20 Railroad Storiesthe monologues of a traveling salesman and his fellow Jewish travelersdepict Jewish thieves and arsonists, feuding spouses, draft evaders, grieving parents and assimilationists. Like the eight Tevye tales, these unprettified stories of simple people and their harsh realities summon a bygone era, but their appeal and application are timeless. Bringing both groups of tales together for the first time in English, this first volume in Schocken's Library of Yiddish Classics series is an auspicious event.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“This fresh translation is likely to serve as the indispensable Sholem Aleichem for some time to come.” —Cynthia Ozick

“The editor and translator have done brilliantly.” —Saul Bellow

“A body of work that is very much alive and that continues to dazzle us with its brilliance, wit, and humanity.” —Leonard Nimoy

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
21
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 25 customer reviews
The 33 page introduction is excellent.
Jon Strand
The fact that Tevye and the other stories are secular tales written in Yiddish already signals that great changes occurred in the ranks of eastern European Jews.
Eric Maroney
This was a perfect translation from the Yiddish for me to use in a class.
Sonia E. Meltzer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Gabriel Lewin on March 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
Sholem Aleichem wrote his stories as a modern Mitnagdic Jew about the "old country" twenty to thirty years after the supposed time setting. Aleichem who had never lived the kind of life that Tevye did, far from it at that, used life stories of people as his inspiration. Although I have a personal predeliction for the musical "Fiddler on the Roof", the stories of Tevye the Dairy Man are among the greatest of all Yiddish literature and the musical just does not do it justice. Issues ranging from the changing times in the larger realm of Russia in the late 19th century to Tevye's own personal faith in God are raised in this masterful collection. One must realize that these stories were written years apart and Aleichem's socio/political views are reflected changingly as they were written. The writer was a master of internal monologue where he has Tevye talking the entire time, yet often you forget and feel as if it is another character. The constant usage of Yiddish, Biblical and liturgical phrases might confuse the first time reader, but this edition contains a very helpful notes section in the back of the book. As part of one's own personal education or for provacative literature for enjoyment, this is one that deserves the attention it receives. I highly recomend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Shalom Freedman HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on March 15, 2006
Format: Paperback
Hillel Halkin is a master translator. His translation of the Sholem Aleichem stories takes out what might be called a 'corny archaic ' element in some other translations.

Sholem Aleichem's humor and pathos, the non- ending dialogue of his Tevye with God, the Yiddish world of Eastern Europe now lost, the questioning ironic often tender tone, are all here.

Read and enjoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 12, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This excellent collection of Sholem Aleichem's stories proves that despite the differences between the modern world and Tevye's, human nature doesn't change. All of Tevye's best qualities--his love of knowledge and for his rebellious daughters--are portrayed with his worst--his stubborness. This is a book that can be read again and again even if one has no knowledge of the meaning of Tevye's Yiddish proverbs.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jon Strand on January 3, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Titling this review "A Classic!" immediately brought to mind Mark Twain's comment: "Classic. A book everybody praises but nobody reads." Often true ... but that would be a sad mistake in this case. This is great, highly enjoyable reading!

Having been reading some very good literature that either (inevitably) ended in the Holocaust or was informed by the Holocaust, I commented to an acquaintance that I wished I could find some Jewish literature that was uninformed by the Holocaust. He shook his head and began, "Well, ..." and I said, "I mean, I wish there was a 19th Century Eastern European Jewish equivalent to Mark Twain!" His face lit up and he said, "There is! Sholem Aleichem!"

The first book I got at amazon was "Classic Yiddish Stories of S.Y. Abramovitsh, Sholem Aleichem, and I.L. Peretz (Judaic Traditions in Literature, Music, and Art)" Very good! It led me to this book.

The 8 Tevye stories, collected as "Tevye the Dairyman" are the masterwork of this collection, richly bringing to life a world that was even then disappearing. the characters become flesh and blood in these monologues delivered by Tevye to Sholem Aleichem. Tears through laughter. Laughter through tears. Their lives were " ... not exactly strewn with roses ... " even then.

The 20 Railroad Stories are a highly enjoyable -though lesser- opus by this perceptive author. The connection -very loose here- is that they are stories observed by, or told to, a commercial traveler riding in the 3rd class railroad cars.

The 33 page introduction is excellent. I might recommend reading it afterwards, though, as there are one or two spoilers in the discussion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Ilya Razuvanov on January 10, 2005
Format: Paperback
Picked up this collection after seeing Fiddler on the Roof on Broadway... Very good, especially the Tevye chapters. Typical Eastern-European Yiddish form: mostly serious, often tragic stories written in a humorous, sarcastic tone. Be ware of catch phrases getting stuck in your head... geared towards people with some historic understandind shtetl life in Czarist Russia. Deffinately wets your apetite for more Yiddish literature.

p.s. If you're unsure whether you'll enjoy this type of literature, check out "Gimpel the Fool", a short story by I.B. Singer. Its great, and it will give you an idea of what to expect.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Richard E. Noble VINE VOICE on July 16, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tevye The Dairyman
And
The Railroad Stories

By Sholem Aleichem

Book Review

By Richard E. Noble

In the Jewish community Sholem (Rabinovich) Aleichem is considered a classic. His character, Tevye the Dairyman, is the very same character we encounter in that wonderful musical "Fiddler on the Roof." It is this group of stories by Sholem Aleichem on which the musical play is based.

I have enjoyed the music and the play, Fiddler on the Roof, for years. It just recently occurred to me that this great tale immortalized in the play must have had an author. I then discovered Sholem Aleichem.

Sholem Aleichem is a pseudonym used by the author to protect himself and his job as "crown rabbi," a state appointed clerical position for a Jewish community in the Russian Ukraine. In Yiddish it translates to "Hello There."

I must say that the story of Tevye the Dairyman and his wife and daughters may be the most impressive bit of fiction story writing that I have ever read. I have been trying to think of some great American writers to compare this man to, but no one comes to mind. This author stands out as a one of a kind.

The manner in which the author presents hope and despair simultaneously is only equaled by his ability to provoke laughter and tears also simultaneously.

I suppose some might be turned off by the "ethnic" nature of the stories but the stories were, in fact, written originally in Yiddish and were directed to a Jewish audience. Only via the efforts of the translator, Hillel Halkin, are we, the general audience, provided the privilege of enjoying this joyous celebration of the tragedy of life - in specific, the quite unique life of the historical Jewish community.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?