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Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man Paperback – September 1, 1992


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Warner; Warner Books ed edition (September 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446394521
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446394529
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (276 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,124,892 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A hilarious, endearing novel.”
–Los Angeles Times

“SHEER UNBEATABLE ENTERTAINMENT.”
–Cosmopolitan

“UNFORGETTABLE AND IRRESISTIBLE.”
–Chattanooga Free Press

“SIDE-SPLITTINGLY FUNNY.”
–Cleveland Plain Dealer --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Inside Flap

Here is Fannie Flagg's high-spirited and unabashedly sentimental first novel, the precursor to the bestselling Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe.

Taken from the pages of Daisy Fay Harper's journal, this is a coming of age story set in rural Mississippi that is by turns hilarious and touching. It begins in 1952 when Daisy Fay is a sassy, truth-tellin' but lonely eleven-year old, and ends six years later when she becomes the flamboyant, unlikely -- but assured -- winner of the Miss Mississippi contest. Along the way, we meet some of the raffish and outrageous town locals, including her own Daddy, who comes up with a mortgage scheme that requires Daisy's "resurrection." This is a thoroughly entertaining comic novel with a heroine who is bound to capture your heart.

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg is also available from Random House AudioBooks. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

FANNIE FLAGG began writing and producing television specials at age nineteen and went on to distinguish herself as an actress and writer in television, films, and the theater. She is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe (which was produced by Universal Pictures as Fried Green Tomatoes), Welcome to the World, Baby Girl!, and Standing in the Rainbow. Flagg's script for Fried Green Tomatoes was nominated for both the Academy and Writers Guild of America Awards and won the highly regarded Scripters Award. Flagg lives in California and in Alabama.

Customer Reviews

I'm recommending this book to all my friends who love to read.
Book Lover
There are several scenes in the book where you laugh out loud and you just have to share it with someone else.
Busy Mom
Not only is it funny, it is well written and has a great story line.
Liam Potin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 76 people found the following review helpful By Antoinette Klein on March 26, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For sheer entertainment and a laugh-out-loud good time, this is the book to read. I think Fannie Flagg is always witty and heartwarming, but this, her first novel, has to be the most humorous book ever.
Daisy Fay Harper's story is told via her diary which begins in 1952 when she is eleven-years-old and ends in 1959 when she leaves Mississippi to begin her long-awaited future. Along the way, the reader is treated to a hodgepodge of beautifully-drawn characters including would-be socialites, restaurant operators, wayward preachers, theater people, back-alley abortionists, and more.
Whether it's rising from the dead, riding half-naked on horseback through the middle of town, or competing for a longed-for scholarship in the Miss Mississippi pageant, Daisy Fay is about the most endearing character to ever leap from the pages of a novel. She is stubborn, feisty, loving, loyal, and focused. Most of all, her coming of age is an accurate portrayal of Southern life in the 1950's. It has not been sanitized to be politically correct or rewritten to avoid offense. It is truthful and sincere and the most side-splittingly funny novel I've had the pleasure of reading.
Whether you grew up in the South or not, this microcosm of small-town life in the 1950's will touch your heart. So join Daisy Fay, her struggling mother and her father, the Miracle Man, for a trip back to a time and era that is too rich with human emotion to ever forget.
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Busy Mom VINE VOICE on January 25, 2001
Format: Paperback
If I ever have a little girl, I would like her name to be Daisy Fay. Well, maybe not. However, Daisy Fay is one of the most unforgettable characters in the history of books ~~ at least in my personal journey through book reading! She is hilarious and she tells you like it is.
There are several scenes in the book where you laugh out loud and you just have to share it with someone else. And the ending ... don't you just love a good story?
If you find yourself reading a dark and gloomy book, be sure to pick this one up. After reading it, you will find your outlook on life so much brighter and cheerful. Fannie Flagg is a master storyteller and though this is the only second book of hers that I have read, you can bet that I will read the rest of hers.
What is so memorable about Daisy Fay? Well, as a child of a broken home, she has managed to find humor in just about every situation of her life. She resists her mother's attempts to make her into a lady ~~ a secret desire just about every girl has ~~ and her father has always told her that he is so glad that he didn't have a son ~~ she was his heart. Daisy Fay captured a lot of hearts in this book and she is guaranteed to capture yours.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By LittleDee on July 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
It's not often accurate to describe anyone as a hero/ine, but Daisy Fay Harper is the heroine of one of my favorite books, "Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man" by Fannie Flagg. It's a sweet, silly, noble, crazy book, sometimes heartrendingly sad but more often hysterically funny; and unlike some cutesie kid characters, Daisy will strike an unmistakeable note of truth with anyone who remembers what being a child was really like.
The book is in the form of Daisy's diary. The story starts when she's eleven and ends when she's about twenty. In the beginning, she's a very bright girl with a sense of humor that can only be described as "wacky" (I usually dislike that word -- but what else can you call somebody who titles her Halloween project "The Hall of Blood and Guts"?). Her parents are constantly fighting, primarily because her father is completely irresponsible, but she's very fond of her father because they're so much alike -- ambitious, charming, full of big ideas and harebrained schemes. Daisy daydreams about movies and popular songs, and eagerly anticipates blossoming into an exciting adulthood of fame, fortune, the occasional albino, and Technicolor adventures.
Like Pippi Longstocking, Daisy is feisty and self-confident, and her mental and emotional health are not at all hampered by "femininity". It doesn't bother her that being smart makes her different from the other kids at school, or that girls aren't supposed to be the class clown -- and if she even realizes that she's an oddball, she's OK with that. Despite her weirdness, she has her own circle of friends, including some grown-ups.
Read more ›
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Dan Barksdale III on July 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
Set a spell and listen as Daisy Fay tells the story of her life. From when she and her family leave Jackson, Mississippi to move to run an ice cream shop in Florida, where, in the winter, her father freezes animals to stuff to make more money. Read as she's "healed" by the miracle man in the most hilarious scene I've ever read! Read as her long lost grandfather, helps her to win the Miss Florida or Mississippi or Alabama crown. Against all odds, Daisy Fay manages to keep a postive, joyful, attitude, despite some pretty bad situations not of her own making.
This is a heartwarming, well-written book, read it, you'll laugh until it hurts! Fannie Flagg is a genius, read her books in order, Daisy Fay first, Fried Green Tomatoes second, and finally Welcome to the World, Baby Girl. This is time used wisely!
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