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Daisy Miller (Dover Thrift Editions) Paperback – October 3, 1995


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Product Details

  • Series: Dover Thrift Editions
  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications; New edition edition (October 3, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486287734
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486287737
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.2 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #39,169 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

James's brief 1858 classic is here presented as a no-frills edition in Dover's Thrift series. Since the text is a staple in many high school and college literature curricula, Dover provides a painless, inexpensive way of stocking multiple copies.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Back Cover

Daisy Miller is a fascinating portrait of a young woman from Schenectady, New York, who, traveling in Europe, runs afoul of the socially pretentious American expatriate community in Rome. First published in 1878, the novella brought American novelist Henry James (1843–1916), then living in London, his first international success. Like many of James' early works, it portrays a venturesome American girl in the treacherous waters of European society—a theme that would culminate in his 1881 masterpiece, The Portrait of a Lady.
On the surface, Daisy Miller unfolds a simple story of a young American girl's willful yet innocent flirtation with a young Italian, and its unfortunate consequences. But throughout the narrative, James contrasts American customs and values with European manners and morals in a tale rich in psychological and social insight. A vivid portrayal of Americans abroad and a telling encounter between the values of the Old and New World, Daisy Miller is an ideal introduction to the work of one of America's greatest writers of fiction.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mazza HALL OF FAME on October 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
As I read Henry James' novella "Daisy Miller," I found myself reminded of Anthony Minghella's film "The Talented Mr. Ripley," starring Matt Damon. Both the novella and the film tell the stories of Americans living luxurious lives in Europe. Both stories also deal with the issue of social unacceptability, and are haunted by the aura of sexual transgression.
James' novella was first published in 1878, making it an early work in the author's illustrious literary career. "Daisy" opens in Switzerland, where Winterbourne, a young American man, meets the title character. An American girl who is described as "an extraordinary mixture of innocence and crudity," Daisy becomes a troublesome figure for the snobby community of Americans abroad.
Some of James' social satire strikes me as rather dated, and I found the conclusion of the tale somewhat unsatisfying. Still, "Daisy" is a well-written tale that, on the whole, remains a good read today. And Daisy herself is a curiously compelling character whose story invites both a serious feminist analysis, as well as an analysis based in economic and class issues. Recommended as a companion text: "Strange Pilgrims," Gabriel Garcia Marquez' collection of stories about Latin Americans in Europe for various reasons.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michael Wischmeyer on June 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
Henry James, one of America's foremost authors in the late 1800s and early 1900s, is primarily remembered and respected for his vivid portrayals of Americans abroad and their encounters with the cultural differences that divided the brash, young, immature American continent from the sophisticated, class conscious Old World. This novella, Daisy Miller (1878), was his first literary success.

From the moment we meet Daisy Miller she is enigmatic, either the epitome of incautious innocence or reckless to the extreme. She disregards European customs, quite assured in her own judgment that she is doing no wrong, only flirting with young gentlemen as would any American girl. As the story progresses, aware of building criticism from the expatriate community, Daisy still chooses to ignore advice from well-meaning, socially prominent women.

We need to recognize that we see Daisy not from the perspective of an omniscient author that is privy to Daisy's innermost thoughts, but through the eyes of a third person, a Mr. Winterbourne, an American bachelor living in Geneva. Winterbourne is obviously attracted to and fascinated by this young, confident, perhaps audacious, visitor from America. Winterbourne's assessment of Daisy Miller is more sympathetic, more balanced, and more reliable than that of the snobbish Mrs. Costello in Vevay in Switzerland and Mrs. Walker in Rome. Or, so I thought upon my first reading.

In his first meeting with Daisy in a hotel garden Winterbourne is both charmed and puzzled by her conversation, and reflects to himself: "He felt that he had lived at Geneva so long that he had lost a good deal; he had become dishabituated to the American tone."

In retrospect I have come to realize that Henry James was cautioning his readers that Mr.
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By Kayla Knox on January 31, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book came in the estimated delivery date. The book was in excellent condition. I really enjoy the story. This edition of the story is just that, there are no footnotes or really any extra details to help the reader. I have seen an edition that had footnotes, and I wished this one did. Either way, it is a great short story and well worth the read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not the best of Henry James, but a good experimental novella, especially for prople in literature workshops. Some of the premises will be followed in later works.
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By Nick on July 10, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great short book! Interesting and it keeps you guessing. The story line was full of twists and the plot wasn't what someone would expect!
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
i think Daisy Miller was an intresting book. Daisy's care-free attitude about rules and society made her an intresting character and how she approached life. i think this book was very good, it showed u another aspect of how people view other people. Her innocent side was conveyed by Mr. Winterbourne while her "improper, vulgar" side was conveyed by the people of Rome such as Mrs. Costello and Mrs. Walker.
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