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Dakota Days Hardcover – June, 1983

16 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 260 pages
  • Publisher: St Martins Pr; 1st edition (June 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312181760
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312181765
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #690,997 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Richard Culter on March 11, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Dakota Days is another of the books on John and Yoko that is considered forbidden by the people who deify the Lennons. If you go into certain venues and attempt to discuss the book, the sheep with act all agitated -- because they think they're supposed to. What the Beatles-worshippers will not give you is a rational basis for their hatred of this book. Their dislike of it, after all, isn't reasonable to begin with. It's just that Dakota Days addresses areas of John's and Yoko's lives -- Yoko's outrageous addiction to superstition, Lennon's depression in the mid-to-late 1970s, etc. -- that Lennon worshippers don't want anyone to know about.

In fact, this is a very good and extremely readable book which fully exposes Yoko's craziness, some of the problems that plagued the Lennons' marriage, and the creative impotence that tormented Lennon in the late 1970s. It's is very telling that the best response Ono could muster to the book was the trotting out of her loathesome spokesperson Elliot Mintz, who duly spouted his usual nonsense. I recommend Dakota Days to those who are genuinely intersted in John and Yoko's lives in the 1975 - 1980 period.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By vgoth on February 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I'm not quite sure why previous reviews have been so low.
I have read many Lennon bios, Goldman, Seaman, May Pang, Ray Coleman, Giuliano.
I find that this bio is quite refreshing, in that John Green seems to be a person who did not yield before the 'John and Yoko' force...he seems to have held his own, and wasn't afraid to face up to them. It seems that Yoko was almost 'beholden' to Green, and that he was a person she (and John) would not try to beat down with her (their) relentless quirks. This is a clear and cleverly written account of John's last five or so years. There are intriguing accounts of Yoko's obsession with a South American witch (ending, in this book, with a kinda hysterical discussion of Yoko's wondering if she was signing a pact with the Devil, only to beg Green to sign his own name, to which he later replied, 'My name, Yoko? no, I signed YOUR name!').
Another account that stands out is John's visit to a 'new-age' (in 21st century terms, remember this was the early 70s) store, in search of proper ceremonial objects for his and Yoko's renewal of their wedding vows. John's sarcastic response to the store's solemn owners made me laugh out loud. I think Green did a very good job of showing Lennon's various sides...from the witty, sarcastic (public-loving) John, to the emotionally crippled, loner, stay-in-bed til I wither, side. The most revealing aspect of the book (and this can be confirmed by May Pang's book 'Loving John') is that Green kept trying to get John to really take responsibility for his life...he kept telling him that he could really do something, make music, be alive, if only he'd take responsibility for it. And, alas, it seems that John chose to wallow in paranoia and nothingness for too long...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By rain cloud on March 20, 2014
Format: Paperback
Having read everything Lennon, I definitely thought this was one of the best. He told his tarot card reader things he didn't tell anyone else, (for example, that the reason we quit recording in the mid-seventies was his complete intimidation by the greatness of McCartney's "Band on the Run.") I doubt he confessed that to many people but he did the tarot reader.

I've always loved Lennon. I think he was the most intelligent of the Beatles and the one with the most interesting personality. I don't necessarily think he was as great as McCartney in some categories but as songwriters they were equals.

This is just a chance to spend a few slow afternoons at the Dakota with Lennon while he chats with and sometimes unzips himself for this psychic Yoko had on the payroll.

THIS BOOK SHOULD BE ON KINDLE. maybe someday it will be.

I'm sure only a hard-core fan would find this fascinating but, if you are one, you should try this out. You won't be disappointed.

The others I recommend are these: "Loving John" by May Pang (his girlfriend) and "the Last Days of John Lennon" by his assistant, Fred Seaman. Both of those books give you the fun of spending casual time with the Great One and if you find him as interesting as many of us, you'll be glad you did.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By petalblossom on June 16, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Green's book is a little different from the others trying to "cash" in on Lennon. His account is a benign one that doesn't offer up startling negative images for the public to gulp down. It really reads as if he's just trying to relate his "memories" of John- memories which do not really say anything new- everything here Lennon has hinted at or said in interviews before his death. Also, Green admits it's a definitive portrait, that John could have acted totally different away from him. his biggest problem is that he uses extensive conversations in quotes that anyone knows he could not possibly have remembered, but even there, he says he doesn't say it's verbatim, he's just recreating an "essence" - so as long as you put all of that in the forefront of your mind while you read it- it's enjoyable- Lennon seems clever, funny, compelling, and as I said, there's nothing here that John hasn't already revealed about the way he was.
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