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The Dallas Women's Guide to Gold-Digging with Pride: A Novel Hardcover – May 22, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; 1 edition (May 22, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345492943
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345492944
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,167,214 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Conklin's acidic debut takes on "master class husband-hunter[s]" prowling the Big D. Ex–New Yorker Jenny Barton, 29, works halfheartedly for the Wall Street Journal's Dallas bureau, recovering from her recent split from also-journo Rafe. Rafe has taken up with Meg, an aging, very wealthy, very nasty, very married Dallas woman—prompting Jenny to go native and catch a rich Texan. Lessons from relentlessly blonde paralegal and divorcée extraordinaire Aimee and friends follow, including an injunction for Jenny to hide her Jewish background from Baylor Jones, heir to a ranching dynasty. Tepid Texas quips ("That's a Texas girl, always thinking about appearances") mix uneasily with "geek chic" Jenny's sharper observations. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

J. C. Conklin is a former Wall Street Journal and Dallas Morning News reporter. Conklin is the co-author of Comeback Moms: How to Leave Work, Raise Children, and Jump-Start Your Career Even If You Haven’t Had a Job in Years, and the co-founder of the movie production company Texas Avenue Films. She lives in Austin, Texas, with her husband, Kim, her son, Columbus, and her two Papillions, Navette and Ruby. It was as a lowly writer in Dallas that she discovered the cutthroat world of husband-hunting. Never get in the way of a single woman turning thirty in Texas–you’ll have permanent scars.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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It is very entertaining.
Amazon Customer
I am a native Texan and I laughed out loud several times reading the book.
Haley
The book was funny and a quick, easy read.
J. Leith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Viviane Crystal VINE VOICE on July 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
What's one to do when the biological clock is ticking away and one's beau has, to put it quite frankly, dumped you and gone on to a fashionably well-known and rich Dallas lady? Why, it's really quite simple - join the hunt!

So Jenny Barton at 29 years old moves to Dallas, Texas from New York, transferring her skills as a Wall Street Journal reporter to the south, along with her determination to wed soon and only out of the best Texas stock. Jenny's quickly assisted by Aimee, a paralegal who herself has been ditched for the same reasons as Jenny. So Aimee sets out to train Jenny, and we get to enjoy the romp.

Use the Internet and other sources to totally investigate one's selection, find a secret way to learn "his" every like and dislike, follow when necessary, and do all that before following one's heart and mind, the latter not necessarily required in carrying out the pre-nuptial plans to success and happiness!

J. C. Conklin has written a luscious, funny-to-the-bone, romp about the way romantic relationships evolve in Dallas, Texas in reality. The process is ludicrous and yet is something that will enthrall readers to the core. Doesn't everyone dream of marrying Prince or Princess Charming?

Though not the main highlights of the plot, the hidden Anti-Semite thinking still lurking in some of the South and what constitutes successful writing for one of the major American newspapers are scintillating subplots that add to the satirical side of this spoof on finding one's true love.

Jenny is a credible, funny and determined character who will hold your interest and under those crazy thoughts and dreams will touch your heart with her desire for what REALLY matters!

Reviewed by Viviane Crystal on July 1, 2007
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sarah on June 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The Dallas Women's Guide to Gold-Digging with Pride is the funniest book I've read in awhile. My favorite part is how author, J.C. Conklin, inserts Southern sayings and translates them, they cracked me up! I definitely wouldn't want to be one of these women, but they're very entertaining to read about. Texas gold digging at it's finest.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By carlylaster on May 30, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I confess that I don't want to be a woman in this book and I might not want to be friends with them (I could hang out with Jenny and Aimee) but I am fascinated by them. I've heard of women like this. I've suspected that some of the young women I see hanging on the arms of old men do this. Now I know. The book lets me peek at a world I would never see because I'm not a D cup with lipoed thighs.

It's frivilous. It's fun. It has an edge. The undertone of anti-semitism is cutting. Does that still happen in Texas?

I wouldn't characterize this as "chick lit." It has more layers than boy meets klutzy girl and antics ensue. I would call it a good summer read.

I confess this is the first review I've written. I have no idea if this is helpful. I was motivated to write it after reading the posts discussing what chick lit is and if this is chick lit. I can say with certainity it's not. It's more than that.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sarabella VINE VOICE on October 28, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I picked this up because it was based in Dallas, where I currently live. While it was certainly readable and had some really funny parts, overall, I didn't love it.

The good: overall well written and easy to read through; the authors use of Southern colloquialisms was fun; if intended as satire, not bad

The bad: predicatable; some rather unlikable characters- who are also a bit TOO much of chariactures; rather boring at times.

Although I am sure many of these women exist, I definately thought some was just a bit too much. Also, I would've liked a little more accurate portrayal of some of the Dallas places/landmarks. I realize this is simply the pet peeve of someone who actually lives in Dallas, but the passage that takes place in Breadwinners drove me crazy. I have been to many brunches there (both locations) and never seen this parade of fashionistas described in the book. I might have gotten a kick out of the whole scenario, but if you're going to tell of such an event, either pick a place where it would actually happen or make someplace up entirely. Just a thought!
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gail Cooke HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
If you're in the market for a mindless bit of fluff for an afternoon at the beach - do get a copy of The Dallas Women's Guide To.....

Conklin has a rather heavy hand with a pen, often making sweeping generalizations, which boggle even the most credulous. We read, "Never get in the way of a single woman turning thirty in Texas. You'll have permanent scars."

Tut-tut, Ms Conklin, here's a news flash for you there are plenty of women in that bracket in the Lone Star state who have rewarding jobs, supportive friends, and thoroughly enjoy life. Reading TDWGTG_DWP one wonders if the author has been watching reruns of the old TV show Dallas and believes it to be the gospel truth.

Yes, I know some would view this novel as satire but satire is supposed to be slyly humorous - there's nothing sly or subtle about this author's wisecracks. They hit with the force of a Texas tornado and, unfortunately, have the same tendency to flatten.

Protagonist Jenny Barton is a transplanted New York writer sent to Dallas by the Wall Street Journal (any coincidence that Conklin also used to work for the Wall Street Journal?) Jenny seems to be a bit testy about her religion, which is Jewish, and indicates she has been thrown into a biased Baptist compound. (Has the author not heard of the esteem in which the Neuman and Nasher families are held?)

Anyway, onward and downward - Jenny is dumped by her current lover, Rafe, and soon meets Aimee who is a dogged and determined husband hunter. Aimee takes Jenny under her toned wing and proceeds to instruct her in the ways of meeting and mating the very rich. What follows is an account of Aimee's pursuit and Jenny's struggle to keep up with the doyenne of the gold-diggers.
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