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A Dance Called America: The Scottish Highlands, the United States and Canada Paperback – September 1, 1995


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Paperback, September 1, 1995
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Mainstream Publishing (September 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1851588078
  • ISBN-13: 978-1851588077
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 6 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #580,710 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A book that should be read by everyone of Highland descent and by any Scot who has more than a passing interest in his or her sense of nationality" The Herald "The definitive story of the Highland impact on the New World" Scotland Magazine "Meticulously researched, these wonderfully evocative studies of bygone eras make fascinating reading for anyone with an interest in Scotland's evolution" Daily Record --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

James Hunter is the author of a number of books on Scottish history, including Culloden and the Last Clansman, Scottish Exodus and Skye: The Island. He lives in Beauly, Inverness-shire. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
Everyone has heard about the potato famines that drove the many Irish immigrants to North America, but what about their celtic sisters and brothers in Scotland? Was it the clearances or was it the disasterous battle at Culloden in 1745? Hunter's book looks not only at the myriad of issues that emptied the highlands, but also at how the Scotts got to North American and what happened to them when they got there. Hunter explains not only the economic factors in Scotland, but also the brutal conditions that many Scots endured during their passage to Canada and the United States. He looks at the political issues in Scotland, England, Canada and the United State. He examines how they survived and why what they did often depended on when and where they landed. Early emmigrants tended to have money whereas those coming later had next to nothing. Hunter tells you about the businesses that they started, the communities that they built and the leadership that they provide even today to new continent. A Dance Called America opens your eyes to a group of people rarely considered when examining the settlement of North America. While anyone interested in history will enjoy this book, those of Scottish descent will find it particularly interesting
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36 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 27, 1997
Format: Paperback
Anyone who is a Scot or has a Scottish background will be fascinated by this book. Meticulously researched, it describes the harrowing lives of the many Scots folks who emigrated to the US and Canada during the 18th and 19th centuries.
We were shocked to learn that some Scottish emigrants had become slave owners, while others with few belongings and no means were left stranded on remote points of the Canadian coastline in the middle of winter.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Bruce MacMillan on June 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
James Hunter has written a great book on Scottish immigration to North America. He strikes a very good balance between Scottish events that determined why people emmigrated, and the different experiences of these gaelic pioneers.
Different periods of emmigration and settlements of Scottish immigrants are covered. The research is very detailed but thankfully doesn't result in statistics which will bore you. Rather Hunter concentrates on the actual experiences of notable settlers and explorers. It's a descriptive account that brings the period alive. I found the description of the quarantine station at Grosse Ile and Cholera Bay to be particularly moving.
This book is more than a chronicle of the hardships, challenges and frustrations that these early settlers had to endure. It reminds us of their achievements and significant contributions. You can appreciate them that much more knowing of their suffererings in a tough, new land.
I'd be giving this book five stars, but I would have liked some maps and I found the chapter on Craigellachie to wander a little bit. But this is still a wonderful book. If you're interested in Scotland or have any Scottish ancestors, add this book to your collection.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "petenlin" on December 27, 2001
Format: Paperback
Some books like some movies stay with you. I learned so much about what happened in Scotland from Hunter's very interesting accounts. This book has made the kind of impression that compells me to reread it and loan it to others. It's a keeper in my bookcase now for reference. Now I am in the process of visiting those places both in Scotland and in America where these displaced peoples were sent.
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