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Dances in Deep Shadows: The Clandestine War in Russia, 1917-1920 Hardcover – June 23, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 388 pages
  • Publisher: Carroll & Graf; 1St Edition edition (June 23, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786717890
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786717897
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,163,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Michael Occleshaw's previous books include Armour Against Fate: British Military Intelligence in the First World War (1989) and The Romanov Conspiracies: The Romanovs and the House of Windsor (1993).

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
DANCES IN DEEP SHADOWS: THE CLANDESTINE WAR IN RUSSIA 1917-20 provides the setting of 1917 Russia, when a Bolshevik coup set the stage for socialism and vanished a capitalist structure in the country - but it goes beyond most facts in examining the underlying influence and sentiments of the Bolsheviks, who used an alliance with Germany to protect their regime and destroy the opposition to their plans. DANCES IN DEEP SHADOWS goes beyond most histories of the era to examine the complex, interconnected political interactions of Russia with other countries, adding in new information to reveal elements of espionage, subterfuge and manipulation. When added into the picture, these elements go farther than most in explaining the rise of socialism in the country.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By B.K.H. on January 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Don't worry. No spoilers here.
This book has a lot of what I found to be previously unknown information about the last years of World War-I,(1917-1918.), Lenin, Trotsky & Bolsheviks & how deeply involved both the Allied & the Central Powers were in dealing with post-Revolutionary Russia.
I've found this book very interesting & I'm reading it for a second time. The political expediency of Russia, England, France & Germany at this time is unreal. The details of just how close Lenin, Trotsky, the Bolsheviks & the Revolution came to imploding opened my eyes to just how strong the power vacuum really was in Russia just weeks after the execution of the Russian Royal Family & how different the end of World War-I might have been.
All the back room deals, the negotiations, the spying on friend & foe alike, the factionalism of people, even countries, its all here, like a modern day spy novel, but this was real.
Being a historian, I found it is a well written, researched & well documented book, but at times, it can be detail overload, especially concerning names, places & dates, but it's not humdrum, full of political intrigue & a great read. If you're someone who has an interest in the Revolution of 1917, the last days of World War I & the Russian Civil War or just likes a good story I'd recommend this book anytime.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Paul E. Richardson VINE VOICE on October 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover
"Intervention" is a rather sanitary word. We talk of family interventions to help steer addicts and alcoholics back to health. And we tout interventions (pre-emptive or otherwise) on the international stage as humanitarian efforts or actions in self-defense against perceived threats.

But tack on an "ism" and the word takes on a decidedly negative connotation: "interference by one country in the political affairs of another" (Merriam-Webster). By becoming an "ism" - signifying a tendency or repetitiveness - it smacks of meddling and sticking one's guns in where one does not belong.

Down through history, a country doing the intervening tends to see their actions as an intervention, while the one being intervened upon sees it as interventionism: Colonial America, Vietnam, Guatemala, Iraq, the Philippines, Chechnya, Lebanon... the examples seem endless. Indeed, in the four decades after World War II, the U.S. and USSR turned interventionism into a regular tool of Cold War diplomacy, interfering militarily in the political affairs of Third World states over 200 times - be it floating a battleship in a harbor to influence an election or lending troops and arms to train/support local forces in a civil war.

It is also the case that intervenedupon countries tend to give the interventions more significance in their ongoing history than do the interveners. Often this is because they pay a much higher price.

In this light, it is worth noting that few historians (George Kennan being a notable exception) have attributed proper significance to western interventionism in Russia's civil war. And, prior to Michael Occleshaw's comprehensive new book on the subject, historians might have been justified in this by a lack of data.
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Format: Hardcover
This is best read as a reference work on the Allied intervention in Siberia and northern Russia shortly after World War One. It has facts, and it has the facts behind the facts. A great deal of detailed information, with a good bibliography and detailed index.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Frank J. Konopka VINE VOICE on February 16, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This book recounts in often mind-numbing detail the secret war carried out within the Soviet Union from and after the First World War. It's an exciting tale, but is marred by being a bit top heavy with names. Despite that, the author tells a compelling tale, and anyone seriously interested in this period of history in Eastern Europe will want to read this book.
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