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Dancing in Your Head Import


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Audio CD, Import, July 26, 2011
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Vinyl, 1977
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Editorial Reviews

Japanese only SHM-CD pressing. Universal. 2011.

Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 26, 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Universal Japan
  • ASIN: B004QEF7KO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #116,718 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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One of the most important (and controversial) innovators of the jazz avant-garde, Ornette Coleman gained both loyal followers and lifelong detractors when he seemed to burst on the scene in 1959 fully formed. Although he, and Don Cherry in his original quartet, played opening and closing melodies together, their solos dispensed altogether with chordal improvisation and harmony, instead playing ... Read more in Amazon's Ornette Coleman Store

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Customer Reviews

This is probably my favorite of Ornette's many albums.
F. R. Nickles Jr.
I've even transcribed it and it still confounds and amazes me.
Elmo's Firetruck
If you like that brief description then you will love this CD.
JD Homestar

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Forbes on August 29, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I still remember when I first heard this record in 1976, shortly after it's release. I had just gotten into Ornette's early quartet and trio recordings and was mourning what I thought was his permanent retirement from recording. I was listening to the late night jazz program on Minnesota public radio and tuned in to this wild funky music. I was immediately captured by the funky beat, the swirling polyrhythms of the guitars and the astounding melodic bass playing. And overtop of it all was this marvelous saxophone. I kept thinking, "jeez (it was Minnesota after all) this guy sounds just like Ornette. But with a funk band!" Imagine my surprise when I found out that indeed, the plastic-altoed Texas master was back recording...and with such a radical conception.

For me, Prime Time was and is a revelation in the music of the seventies. Though funk and free jazz have many commonalities and the ties between them go back at least to Archie Shepp's and Pharoah Saunders' Impulse albums, the relationship is mostly unnoticed. Miles' early jazz-rock experiments were largely free jazz albums with funky beats. The Art Ensemble of Chicago recorded some potent free-funk in 1968 in Paris of all places. And groups like EWF and especially P-Funk often had extended moments in their jams where the improvisation lost touch with earth for a minute or two and floated freely into the stratosphere. But by 1976 much of the initial creative fever in jazz-funk had died...Miles was retired, Herbie's Headhunters were moving more to disco, and most of the early promise of the movement on the jazz side was sliding towards what would become "smooth jazz" a decade later.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michael Stack VINE VOICE on August 4, 2005
Format: Audio CD
The mid 1970s were a time of experimentation for free jazz pioneer Ornette Coleman. It had been quite a while since he had turned the world on its head with his legendary "The Shape of Jazz to Come", and his influence throughout jazz was widely acknowledged, even by some who had previously scorned him. Coleman had become somewhat more eccentric in his working habits, performing and recording less frequently. As such, it seems that looking back some ideas were fully formed upon recording when a large time of development took place.

Two of the great experiments from Coleman during this period was his work with musicians in Morocco (the Master Musicians of Joujouka) and his experimentation with electric instruments in his working band. This record brings together recordings of those two experiments.

The electric band material dominates the record-- two lengthy tracks, two takes of the same piece, the ecstatic "Theme From a Symphony" (originally "The Good Life" on "Skies of America" and "School Work" on "Science Fiction" and later referred to simply as the title of this album, "Dancing in Your Head"). The takes both feature Coleman's shrill sax doubled by guitar stating the theme and fluid and melodic bass playing from Jamaaladeen Tacuma that certainly is enough to secure his place among the greats. But there's differences too-- the first variation is significantly longer, with Coleman occupying almost all the solo space (on the second variation, he shares with a fuzz guitar). Ronald Shannon Jackson's drumming is quite different on the two-- looser and more open on variation two, although in both he quotes the theme during his performance to great effect.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Elmo's Firetruck on May 15, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I remember buying this LP based on some review I read in some long forgotten magazine (Stereo Review, maybe?). I was in college at the time and just discovering jazz--you know, "Kind of Blue" and "A Love Supreme" were still new to my ears.
Anyway, I bought this LP and but it on the table and just sat there stunned. I had never heard ANYTHING like this before and really felt almost assaulted by the wave that crashed down upon me. I didn't listen to this record again for about a month and then slowing began to spin it more and more. There is a "goove" here laid down by Bern Nix that is like nothing that came before it--you have to listen to understand. The sing-songy chorus that goes on and ON finally explodes into one of the most astounding Coleman solos ever captured. I listen and listen and still can't get to the bottom of it. I've even transcribed it and it still confounds and amazes me.
Earlier this year my neighbors put their house up for sale and held "open house" every weekend for a couple of months. I got tired of the parade, so I opened all my windows, put the old LP on the table and BLASTED "Dancing in Your Head" at FULL VOLUME all afternoon. It was awesome.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 28, 2000
Format: Audio CD
What is especially amazing to me about "Dancing..." is not that it was done, but when. amazon.com reviewer Mr. Broomer writes that this album was recorded in 1976, but I think that the liner notes say that the recording dates occur in 1973 and 1975. In either case, if one considers what musics (of any genre) were being produced during those years, it becomes evident that Ornette and company were at that time innovating almost boundlessly.
Creating linear structures, textures and tone paintings of intense complexity, with both great finesse and assertiveness, this ensemble soared past genre bending and blending into areas that can only be explained by epiphany.
Drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson's contribution, alone, is worth the price of admission. He does with (seemingly) straight time what Ed Blackwell did with swing: simultaneous deconstruction of and tribute to precedent. Jamaaladeen and Ellerbee hadn't yet reached the height of their powers on "Dancing...", but the signs of great things to come are there. Bern Nix is magnificent on this album, and must be heard to be believed.
"Dancing in Your Head" and it's grittier, funkier sister album "Body Meta" may not have embodied "the" change of the century, but I think that they represent one of the most important changes. Though ahead of most others, as usual, Ornette proved with this album that his time had come.
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