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Dangerous Diplomacy: How the State Department Threatens America's Security Hardcover – September 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Regnery Publishing (September 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0895261103
  • ISBN-13: 978-0895261106
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,152,589 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Joel Mowbray is a tenacious reporter who knows how to penetrate Foggy Bottom doublespeak. In this book, he skillfully dissects -- Michael Isikoff

What Joel Mowbray uncovers about the State Department is truly shocking. He has performed a unique and invaluable service in -- Sean Hannity

From the Inside Flap

WHOSE SIDE ARE THEY ON?

Diplomacy is one thing. But giving aid and comfort to the enemy is quite another. Yet that is exactly what our very own State Department is doing--coddling brutal dictators, covering up gaping holes in our nation's safety net, and appeasing regimes that actively sponsor terrorists around the world. In this global war on terrorism, the US State Department has proven itself to be one of our biggest obstacles to victory.

In Dangerous Diplomacy, investigative reporter Joel Mowbray exposes teh hidden agendas, mixed allegiances, and outright anti-Americanism that has infected the US State Department. Relying on exhaustive interviews with State Department personnel and extensive research into State's publications, procedures, and recent history, Mowbray reveals an astounding pattern of shortsighted and misguided policies, compounded by an ingrained resistance to self-criticism and corruption.

In Dangerous Diplomacy you'll learn:
*How State's obsession with global "stability" has led it to support bloodthirsty dictators (including many who would rejoice at the demise of the United States)
*State's herculean efforts to cover up the lax visa policies that allowed the September 11 hijackers to enter the US legally--while keeping those policies in place as long as possible
*States arms-for-tyrants program--and how it very nearly succeeded in providing Saddam Hussein's Iraq with nuclear capabilities
*The State/Saudi alliance: Why State bends over backwards to keep the Saudis happy despite the kingdom's clear support for global terrorism
*How American parents whose children have been kidnapped by foreign nationals have been ignored, deserted, and betrayed by the embassies and officials who are supposed to protect Americans
*State's strange and long-standing fondness for brutal, radical Islamic regimes
*How State's entrenched culture makes refore of the organization virtually impossible
*How State concealed information about North Korea's nuclear program
*The Iranian democracy movement: Why it soldiers on with no help from the State Department
*The sorry record of how State not only has declined to discipline incompetent and corrupt immigration officials who let terrorists and other criminals into the US, but rewarded them
*How State has actually fought against families victimized by evil regimes who are trying to recover damages

Mowbray documents a State Department in dire need of reform--revealing here for the first time just how far State has strayed from its intended role as the primary agent of US interests abroad.


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Customer Reviews

I consider this book as the must read for anyone.
nopasaran
One amazing chapter details Ronald Reagan's Secretary of State, Charles Shultz testing the loyalties of Foreign Service operatives.
Jonathan Garthwaite
I encourage an investigation into each and every one of the issues brought up in the book, but not a superficial one.
southasia

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 59 people found the following review helpful By "allens27" on October 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I thought I'd hate this book, I'm not a conservative (would actually classify myself as more of a liberal) and I generally don't like political books, but I couldn't put it down. It's not sensationalistic or tabloidy, just good, hard-nosed reporting. From how the State Department supported the Taliban to how it gave $10,000 bonuses for "outstanding performance" to the executives in charge of giving visas to the 9/11 terrorists, Dangerous Diplomacy makes me afraid of my own government. And in case you don't believe Mowbray, there is a documents section at the end filled with classified memos that prove, in black-and-white, that the State Department has its own agenda.
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45 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Garthwaite on September 27, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Mowbray tells the tale of a government department woefully out-of-control. One amazing chapter details Ronald Reagan's Secretary of State, Charles Shultz testing the loyalties of Foreign Service operatives. All to often they would be more interested in helping their host country than serving the interests of the United States.
Mowbray was briefly detained by the State Department last year. That detainment certainly spurred the reporter to dig deeper into the problems at State. I bet they wish they could go back and undo that mistake.
If you've been following the war on terrorism, you owe it to yourself to read this book and find out if the entire government is united in that goal or not. I definitely recommend this book.
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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful By reader on September 24, 2003
Format: Hardcover
A hard-hitting eye-opener that documents our State Department's Arabist elite's us versus them orientation (no, no, it's not the pro-America us against the terrorists and their supporters you might expect in a time of war!). Given the large number of State Department heroes who lost their lives in service to America, the Arabist's attitude is baffling. Hard to come away from the book with a good feeling about State's current crop of a virtually unaccountable putative elite.
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30 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 31, 2003
Format: Hardcover
In this staccato burst book, Mr. Mowbray tells his perspective of many damning stories of the Department of State (DOS). His view is shaped by the formative experience he had of being detained by DOS security personnel for having the temerity to question a DOS spokesman on expedited visas in Saudi Arabia, and the lack of bureaucratic accountability.
Mr. Mowbray in eleven concise chapters, attacks DOS on several fronts--but his overarching theme is that DOS needs to remember why they exist--to advocate AMERICAN foreign policy aims, here and abroad. Mowbrays's contention is that DOS careerists frequently "go native" or display extreme "Stockholm syndrome" towards their target countries, and they forget that "their country" is not the country to which they have most recently been accredited as diplomats, or spent a lifetime studying and living in. DOS and their career Foreign Service Officers exist for one simple purpose: to get "on message" with the long term interests of the US, and advocate for them.
In every story, there are at least three sides--my side, your side, and the truth. One should read "Dangerous Diplomacy" with at least one arched eyebrow, wondering what the "rest of the story" is. Nonetheless, Mowbray's telling of the DOS failure to pressure Saudi Arabia, whether over general human rights issues, or terrorism, or kidnapped US children, has a great deal of truth in its perceptions. I have spent a great deal of time in the Middle East--and repeatedly US government officials are kowtowing to Saudis.
It is important to remember that nations have neither permanent friends nor permanent enemies, they have only permanent interests, as Chaim Herzog famously put it.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Hendrick on October 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
In my opinion, the book was well written and Mowbray certainly deserves some credit for uncovering and publicizing the Visa Express Program. I always thought that the State Department's official policy is based on reciprocity. US-citizens do not require visa for a significant number of countries, and in some cases the policy is unilateral, meaning citizens of some countries (Central & Eastern Europe, Latin America, South America, Africa, most countries in Asia) do require a visa to enter the US while US citizens are exempt from such requirement. Not with Saudi Arabia. There have never been any tourist visas or Visa Express Program for US-citizens wishing to visit Saudi Arabia. You can only visit Saudi Arabia for Hajj but only if you are Muslim. Non-Muslim are barred from entering Mecca, as Mowbray correctly points out in his book.
While Saudi Arabia was not officially part of the Visa Waiver Program, Saudi citizens were literally given an unhindered entry through the INS (now BCIS) door and on 911 they entered directly through many windows killing 3.000 people.
Saudi Arabia is clearly an enemy of the United States and it is time the USG comes to term with this new post-911 reality. It is time for American people to realize that Saudi Arabia is an oppressive regime clouded in hatred against Western freedom and values. Anybody coming to the US can practice whatever religion he likes. This isn't the case in most Arab countries, and in particular Saudi Arabia, where even possession of BIBLE is considered crime punishable by severe sentence!!!
Saudi Arabia is run by somebody who was born in desert, has no formal education, speaks no English, and spends most of time riding camels in the middle of nowhere. And he needs more and more the support of the Unites States if he wants to stay in power, certainly more than we need Saudi Arabia.
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