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Daniel Deronda Kindle Edition

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Length: 978 pages

Sing for Us
Historical Fiction
Based on a true story, Sing for Us is a riveting tale of love and hope in the last days of the Civil War. Learn more

Product Details

  • File Size: 1143 KB
  • Print Length: 978 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 17, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0084ATXJM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,586 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Born Mary Ann Evans, Victorian novelist George Eliot (1819-1880) is the author of a number of remarkable works, including the masterpiece Middlemarch.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 43 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 31, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"Daniel Deronda" was the last novel George Eliot wrote, and it's an appropriate finale to her career -- a lushly-written, heartfelt story about a young man searching for his past (and clues to his future), as well as a vibrant strong-willed young lady who discovers that life doesn't always go your way. Even better, Eliot deftly avoided the cliches and caricatures of the Jewish people, portraying them with love and respect.

Daniel Deronda is the ward (and rumored illegitimate son) of a nobleman, who is unsure of his past (particularly of his mother) catching a glimpse of pretty, reckless, arrogant Gwendolyn Harleth at a casino. Gwendolyn (who boasts that she gets everything she wants) is interested in Daniel, but when her family loses all their money, she marries a rich suitor, a relative of Daniel's -- knowing that his mistress and illegitimate children will be disinherited. But she soon finds that her new husband is a sadistic brute, and sees Daniel as her only help.

Meanwhile, Daniel rescues the despairing Mirah Lapidoth from a suicide attempt in the river, and he helps the young Jewish singer find a home and friends to care for her. As he helps her find her family, he becomes passionately attached to the Jewish population and their plight, embodied by a dying young visionary and a kindly shopkeeping family. Then he receives an important message -- one that will illuminate his roots, and give him a course for the future.

When Eliot published her final novel, it caused a massive stir -- not many novelists tackled the plight of the Jewish population, or how it compared to the gilded upper classes.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Historical Fiction Fan on March 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I saw the BBC movie version before reading the book, and both were very enjoyable. There's more to the story, of course, in the book, but they did a good job with it in the movie. I did enjoy getting into the characters' heads more, as always with a book versus movie, although there were times when the book didn't hold my interest well. It's very long and some parts are just a bit too wordy, but still a great story and a good read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ruth Meitin Garbus on December 12, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A masterpiece...the drama of early Zionism fascinating.
Characters In Daniel deronda magnificently drawn. feeling and action are united? Almost as good as Middlemarch
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By nemotode on June 30, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Far more difficult than George Eliot's Middlemarch, and not so tidy, but worth every kern. The tempestuous, proto-feminist character of Gwendolen alone would support a fine novel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Robinson on October 8, 2012
Format: Paperback
This novel starts slowly. One wonders when it will become interesting. But then slowly it pulls the reader into the story, especially after the first 50 to 100 pages. Once you get halfway through, it becomes a fascinating read - worthy of Eliot's reputation. The last part is very good.

George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans, 1819-1880) has gained the reputation as being one of the finest writers of 19th century England. She is considered to be an equal of Jane Austen or the Bronte sisters, or any other writer of her era. Middlemarch is her masterpiece.

This is the third novel that I have read by Eliot: first, Adam Bede, 1859, then recently, Silas Marner, 1861, and now Daniel Deronda, 1876. The present novel is by far the most complex of those three. According to critics, it is the most complex of her novels. Also, it was her last novel.

Eliot was mid-nineteenth century writer and an agnostic. But, she was also tied to Christian moral values. These are an integral part of her stories. Her characters and plots are easier to believe than Dickens, who for example, introduced highly improbable reunions and lost relatives to get closure for his plot in Oliver Twist. And, the characters of George Eliot are more human and realistic than those found in the novels of Jane Austen or those in Charlotte Bronte's highly entertaining Jane Eyre. Also, she has much detail in her minor characters. Middlemarch has been acknowledged by the critics as her masterpiece.

Daniel Deronda is the title and the name of a leading character in the story. There are two main characters: Deronda and Gwendolen. Some readers will not like all the details and descriptions. There are many characters and there is the fusion of two overlapping stories.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By catlover on August 1, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
George Eliot's genius was in her ability to weave together seemingly disparate story threads and characters into a seamless masterpiece of astonishing beauty. This big, lush book is set in Victorian England with unforgettable characters - Gwendolen, the selfish, spoiled femme fatale; Mirah, the shy, tragic Jewish singer; Grandcourt, the elegant, drawling sociopath; Mordecai, the human embodiment of Israel's soul; Daniel Deronda, nobody's son, yet the catalyst for hope. The language is sometimes dense, but well worth the reader's time. George Eliot was truly a genius. Her portrayal of the confines of a woman in an unhappy and emotionally abusive marriage was so suspenseful, I was caught up in Gwendolyn's sense of dread and fear. Eliot uplifted her Jewish characters to a place of nobility and spiritual beauty, which in her time was a departure of the norm, although it has to be said that she juxtaposed these "higher" characters against the more "common" qualities attributed in that society and in that time to Jewish people. It was almost as if she were making a point of saying to her readers, "See, there are some good ones." But the overall redemptive quality of the storyline as it related to the idea of a man's embracing his Jewish identity and purpose was extremely beautiful, and allowed me to forgive the caricatures in other parts. This is truly a great love story.
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