Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Daphnis Et Chloe
 
See larger image
 

Daphnis Et Chloe

Ravel , Toscanini , NBC Audio CD
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)


Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
MP3 Music, 29 Songs, 2009 $3.99  
Audio CD, 1990 $8.18  
Audio CD, 1992 --  

Amazon's NBC交響楽団 Store

Visit Amazon's NBC交響楽団 Store
for all the music, discussions, and more.


Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 9, 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: RCA
  • ASIN: B000003EYG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #657,229 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Daphnis Et Chloe: Ste No.2: Daybreak
2. Daphnis Et Chloe: Pantomime
3. Daphnis Et Chloe: Danse Generale
4. Psyche: No.4, Psyche Et Eros
5. The Sorcerer's Apprentice
6. Danse Macabre, Op. 40
7. Roman Carnival Ov, Op.9
8. Romeo Et Juliette, Op.17: Scherzo (Queen Mab)
9. Rakoczy March (From La Damnation De Faust)
10. Mignon: Ov

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
(9)
4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indispensible Item in Any Toscanini Historic Collection! September 17, 1998
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
5 Full Stars of Praise for this exciting CD reissue in the "official" RCA / BMG canon. Transfers are honest and pure, in genuine full- bodied monaural sound.
In each and every case, no prior issue (either domestic US, British, or German LP) has sounded as good as this compact disk production. Those auditors who still prefer LPs over CDs must note that the Berlioz "Roman Carnival Overture", Franck, Dukas, Saint-Saens, and Thomas selections were generally available in the latter fifties and later in "enhanced sound" pressings that had falsified, boosted treble and bass, and extra peak compression, to "juice up" the playback quality for RCA Victor Orthophonic phonographs. Here, we have as close a transfer of the masters as we are ever likely to get, without the "enhancement".
Some of the recordings are breathtaking in their fidelity and impact: the items mentioned immediately above, as well as even the 1949 (compressed and limited) tape master of the Ravel "Daphnis et Chloe" Second Suite, which has never sounded fresher and more impressive. It is even surprising to discover that the Berlioz "Rakoczy March" acetate aircheck disk from a September, 1945 Studio 8-H broadcast has so much richness and clarity (being far superior in dynamic range to the RCA recording by Monteux and the SF Symphony from 1951.)
Once again, the calumny that RCA made "bad Toscanini recordings" is refuted here in this essential collection, sure to please music lovers of the widest taste in French repertoire (which was always a specialty of the Maestro.) Highly recommended!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Operatic Highlights March 9, 2006
Format:Audio CD
Actor Tony Randall, who was a really great operatic buff, always said that his favorite singing actor was Leonard Warren, who sang for many years at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Indeed, Warren died suddenly in 1960 during a performance at the old Met. Warren's abilities can be really appreciated in recorded performances such as the 1957 complete (stereo) RCA Victor recording of Puccini's "La Tosca" (ably conducted by Toscanini's protege Erich Leinsdorf) and in this final act from Verdi's "Rigoletto."

Even if we can't see Warren acting, we can sense his incredible involvement in the performance. This is very true in this live performance in New York City's Madison Square Garden, which actually used the combined forces of the NBC Symphony Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Arturo Toscanini served as music director of both orchestras: the Philharmonic from 1926 to 1936 and the NBC from 1937 to 1954. Joining these two wonderful orchestras together for the special Red Cross benefit was quite an accomplishment.

Warren's singing as the tragic jester Rigoletto is very powerful in this performance; it is he who discovers that his daughter, Gilda, has not only been seduced and abandoned but accidentally, fatally stabbed. Typical of many operas, Gilda has to sing a farewell before she actually dies. In this case, Toscanini used Zinka Milanov, a very strong, dramatic soprano, who still managed to sing with great sensitivity and virtuosity.

For the villain, the Duke, Toscanini turned to his favorite American tenor, Jan Peerce. This writer had the privilege of meeting Peerce in 1977, when he was still singing quite well in his early seventies, and it was wonderful to learn that he thought so highly of Toscanini.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A revelation September 9, 2011
Format:Audio CD
Back in the late 1960s, when I was just getting hooked on opera, I bought the old light-blue-sleeved Victrola vinyl of this 1944 live performance of Rigoletto, Act 4. It was recorded in Madison Square Garden of all places, as part of a wartime benefit concert. The sound was a bit gritty, and in its CD reincarnation it isn't much better -- but the revelatory aspect of it for me at that time was the sense that came across of the Act as a single sweep of music. I can give only an impressionistic account of this, since I'm not a musically literate person, but I think it had to do with Toscanini's judgement of the tempo relations among the sections. The sequence just made sense to an extent that other recordings (often with excellent playing and singing) did not. Not that the singing in this concert was bad -- Peerce had an odd distinctive voice that wasn't very Italianate, but he sang with vigor and taste. Milanov was probably in her prime in 1944, and while even then one can't imagine her singing a complete Gilda (I doubt if she had the coloratura for Caro Nome, for example), the voice is perfect for Act 4, and she gives a deeply moving performance. Leonard Warren's Rigoletto singing in the act is beyond criticism. All of them are wonderfully expressive and seem unconstrained in any way by Toscanini's brisk tempos. It's true -- no one on record sings the Duke's music as beautifully as Bjoerling did; Gobbi's complete Rigoletto is very special; and the young Sutherland's 1959 Gilda is a marvel in many ways, but this recording of Act 4 is one of the glories of recorded opera. Grab it if you can.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous French Masterpieces March 8, 2006
Format:Audio CD
Here is a good sampling of Arturo Toscanini's French repertoire in a very fine compilation of performances with the NBC Symphony Orchestra.

Certainly the highlights are the spectacular performances of Paul Dukas' "The Sorceror's Apprentice" and Maurice Ravel's "Daphnis and Chloe - Suite No. 2." The famous Dukas symphonic poem, inspired by Goethe's poem (which was inspired by an ancient legend), is a treasure. It is taken from a recording session in NBC Studio 8-H, without an audience, in 1950 and was among Toscanini's final recordings in the NBC Symphony's longtime home. The results were quite good, with some reverberation and high fidelity sound. The performance itself is among the best ever recorded, filled with mystery, beauty, and energy. It is generally faster-paced than many recordings, but this does not detract from the overall impression, given the virtuoso playing by the NBC musicians.

The Ravel (recorded in Carnegie Hall in 1949) has considerable drive, too, and is really delightful. The second suite includes approximately the second half of the full ballet, minus the usual wordless mixed chorus. Toscanini keeps things moving throughout and there are some very impressive performances by the principal players, especially the flutist. It all culminates with the furious finale dance that ends the ballet, given one of the most intense and relentless performances ever recorded.

Camille Saint-Sanes' "Danse macabre" is one of those all-too-familiar works that is given new life in this performance by Toscanini and the NBC Symphony. The strings of the NBC orchestra are especially excellent in this performance. It was also recorded in Studio 8-H in 1950.

The remaining works are all very impressive.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0x9f952534)

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category