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Dare We Hope That All Men Be Saved? With a Short Discourse on Hell Paperback


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Dare We Hope That All Men Be Saved? With a Short Discourse on Hell + Answer to the Pelagians (I/26) (Works of Saint Augustine) + 14. St. Prosper of Aquitaine: The Call of All Nations (Ancient Christian Writers)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 254 pages
  • Publisher: Ignatius Press (November 1, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0898702070
  • ISBN-13: 978-0898702071
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 4.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #456,208 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: German

Customer Reviews

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Hans Urs von Balthasar -- but arguably one of the most important.
David Zampino
We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, and that if we persevere in that love, nothing whatever can separate us from Christ (cf.
TheoGnostus
He hopes all will be saved, not because all deserve Heaven, but rather because all will come to know the great mercy and forgiveness of Our Lord Jesus Christ.
Pete Vere

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Pete Vere on November 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is one of my two favorite books written by Hans Urs von Balthasar. The Catholic Church asserts that certain individuals are in Heaven, but never declares a specific individual to be in Hell. In fact, the Church still hopes that in their final moments of life, even the greatest sinners such as Judas Iscariot and Adolph Hitler would have repented of their terrible sins.
In this book, Hans Urs von Balthasar pushes the hope that in their final moments of life, all souls will repent and make their peace with God. He hopes all will be saved, not because all deserve Heaven, but rather because all will come to know the great mercy and forgiveness of Our Lord Jesus Christ.
Nevertheless, von Balthasar HOPES for the salvation of all. He does not maintain all will indeed be saved, but rather this is his hope. Several times in the work, von Balthasar reminds the reader that Hell remains a very real possibility, and that man must always keep this possibility before his eyes.
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53 of 56 people found the following review helpful By David Zampino VINE VOICE on October 15, 2001
Format: Paperback
. . .by the late Catholic theologian Fr. Hans Urs von Balthasar -- but arguably one of the most important.
Critics have unfairly suggested that Fr. von Balthasar is either denying the existence of a literal hell, or denying that anyone is/has been/will be located there. These critics miss the point entirely.
My (extremely brief) summary of Fr. von Balthasar's argument does not concern the existence of hell but rather of the duty of the Christian, which is to fervently pray and hope that all men ARE eventually saved; that the love of Christ CAN eventually reach and be accepted by all; and that knowing through Holy Writ that some will NOT be saved and will choose against God does not free the Christian from the duty of praying for such persons.
In today's troubling times, von Balthasar's message is of timeless importance. To dare to hope and to dare to pray that the love of God will melt the heart of even the most heinous of sinners is a difficult duty. Indeed, such a reminder is liable to make many people angry. But it is, nevertheless, a reminder which needs to be made.
This book is less technical than much of von Balthasar's work, and thus should be much more widely accessible to the informed layman.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Didaskalex VINE VOICE on November 25, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"We are allowed to hope that no human is eternally damned. This is a founded theological hope, it is not a certitude. Indeed each person must existentially live with the real possibility that he or she might be doomed. The thesis itself is prompted, we believe, by mercy." Balthasar

Hell and Salvation:
The Church's teaching on Hell has been generally avoided by Christian theologians, who believe that the Lord's own desire that everyone be saved 1Tim 2:4. Hans Urs Cardinal von Balthasar is a notable exception of this attitude, who amended Dare We Hope "That All Men Be Saved"? With a Short Discourse on Hell (1988).

Apokatastasis, Restoration of all things:
Since the soul is essentially rational, argued Origen, it will eventually be restored to the divine truth, salvation will follow. The word Origen used to describe this process of universal salvation "restoration of all things," was apokatastasis. Prompted by his idea of the pre-existence of souls, Origen may have come to view the mission of the temporal Church as "a gathering up of all lost, fallen souls into a unity resembling that which subsisted primordially." Origen could not rationalize the standard Christian idea that certain souls will inevitably fail to achieve salvation, and be plunged into eternal torment. Apokatastasis, may be viewed as restoration, the culmination of gathering souls in a unity of faith. "Origen held a firm conviction that not a single rational being will be lost to the darkness of ignorance and sin. Even the most recalcitrant sinner, he argued, will eventually attain salvation." Edward Moore.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Anne Rice on October 19, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Are our beliefs about Hell changing? I would say that they are. Many Christians today, I think, are deeply uneasy with the notion of a place of eternal damnation and unremitting punishment. Their faith in God is strong. But they have real questions as to whether any soul can really merit everlasting torment. ---- And non Christians report that the concept of Hell is something that stands between them and embracing faith. ----- This does not mean people don't want to face the consequences of sin, I don't think. It means that they have trouble grasping the finality of damnation and the everlasting punishment for sins committed by flawed human beings. -----Whatever the case, many are troubled by the concept of Hell, but they long to be faithful to their God, to the Scriptures, and to their churches. Does that mean they have to believe more people go to Hell than to Heaven? Does that mean that they have to believe people are burning in Hell now and will be for all eternity? This book by a brilliant theologian explores the possibility that we might indeed hope that all humans can be saved. Balthasar examines Scripture, Christian tradition and the writings of the saints on this subject. And he quotes much very impressive material. Whatever one concludes, after reading this book, one has to be aware of the complexity of the questions surrounding Hell, and God's justice and mercy.
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