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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the Man Without Fear with a spring in his step and a twinkle in his eye... is Frank Miller okay with this?
Celebrated comic book scribes have come and gone on DAREDEVIL, and call it the Frank Miller influence but they'd all pretty much bestowed ridiculous tough love on Matt Murdock. The Man Without Fear has been thru some bleak times. To quote Matt: "It has been a miserable last few years. And every time I thought I'd finally hit bottom, God somehow found me a bigger...
Published on February 6, 2012 by H. Bala

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24 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fresh new direction that holds onto a stale concept
I hadn't read Daredevil since Brian Bendis left the book and I heard such horrible things about Shadowland, but when Mark Waid writes a book, I just have to check it out.

Waid takes Daredevil in a new direction. Instead of a Matt Murdock who is grim, gritty, down on his luck, self-loathing, and holds a grudge against life in general, we get to see a cheerful,...
Published on January 28, 2012 by R. J. Sand


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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the Man Without Fear with a spring in his step and a twinkle in his eye... is Frank Miller okay with this?, February 6, 2012
By 
H. Bala "Me Too Can Read" (Recently moved back to Carson, California, or as I call it... the center of the universe) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)
Celebrated comic book scribes have come and gone on DAREDEVIL, and call it the Frank Miller influence but they'd all pretty much bestowed ridiculous tough love on Matt Murdock. The Man Without Fear has been thru some bleak times. To quote Matt: "It has been a miserable last few years. And every time I thought I'd finally hit bottom, God somehow found me a bigger shovel."

Off the top of my head, there are two veteran comic book writers whom I absolutely respect: Ron Marz, the Top Cow's main architect who's demonstrated longevity on WITCHBLADE, and Mark Waid who's been doing big things with BOOM Studios' IRREDEEMABLE and INCORRUPTIBLE. And I loved their run over on the defunct CrossGen company. But here's Mark Waid now to kick dirt on what Frank Miller has wrought on DAREDEVIL, and maybe it's time someone did that, do away with the nonstop doom and gloom. Daredevil's fall from grace during the Shadowland arc had me wondering in what direction they would take our blind vigilante. Waid aims to let in some sunshine on Matt Murdock's corner of the universe. The result is perhaps 2011's most unexpectedly successful comic book title.

Remember those early, pre-Miller years when Daredevil actually exhibited a sunnier disposition? This was back in the day before the comic book medium got all post-modern and started focusing on depicting gritty, realistic stories. Mark Waid brings back the Silver Age sensibility. He reintroduces Daredevil's zest for life and his swashbuckling demeanor. He makes him into a more lighthearted adventurer. And so what if it's Matt Murdock purposely wallowing in self-denial? Criminy's sake, dude was just possessed by a demon and forced into performing heinous deeds. He's entitled to a break.

Matt's back in New York City, back from who knows where. He and Foggy Nelson are intent on reestablishing their law firm. But Matt's step back into the court room is confounded by opposing counsel's constant mention of his crimefighting alter ego. Yes, plenty of people still believe Matt is Daredevil. This compels Matt to come up with a new way to practice law. But is it completely above board?

There's optimism now, and brightness and a renewed sense of adventure, and you get a whiff of all this from the opening moments of the revived series' first issue, as Daredevil crashes a mob wedding and foils an abduction attempt by the Spot (and then plants one on the bride). Waid is such a solid storyteller; he knows pace; he writes sharp dialogue. He has a way of presenting his protagonist as heroic without being pompous. That opening sequence is Waid's gambit in a nutshell. Lighten up the ol' hornhead.

Foggy - who's in on Matt's devilish alter ego - isn't sure he's down with Matt's suddenly carefree philosophy. He's waiting for the other shoe to drop (maybe we all are). That doesn't happen in this volume. Instead, Matt's civilian job has him taking on a police brutality case and a wrongful termination case. This last one presents Matt and Foggy with a blind client who had inadvertently uncovered a sweeping conspiracy connecting five superterrorist organizations. That makes him a desperately wanted man.

It's no coincidence that both cases have Matt more directly involved as Daredevil. As such, he ends up tangling with Klaw, Master of Sound, and with a paid assassin called Bruiser. Bruiser is a metahuman who can shift his center of gravity to any part of his body. Bruiser is interesting in that his ultimate goal is to fight the Hulk. As such, he's steadily working his way up the ranks of superhumans, each adversary more powerful than the last. Bruiser has a check-off list. He even writes a blog about it. In their first scrap, he wipes the floor with Daredevil. Matt, hey, easy on the hubris.

The tandem of artists, Paolo Rivera and Marcos Martin, brings a vibrant and dynamic aesthetic. Rivera handles the first three issues, with Martin picking up the three after that (Martin also draws the backup story in issue #1). These two cats complement each other perfectly, both favoring delicate yet lively line works. Credit Waid for a lot of this series' newfound success, but don't sneeze at Rivera and Marcos's contributions. I particularly love how they visually translate Daredevil's radar sense. This allows us a peek into how Matt's enhanced senses interpret the world for him. Pages 4 & 5 of Martin's issue #1 backup story transforms Matt and Foggy's simple neighborhood walk into an exquisite visual treat, partly because we get to see what Matt "sees." It's a joy nowadays to read this title, sir. There's that sense of escapism again. Next thing you know, Waid'll have DD back in nostalgic black and yellow threads.

DAREDEVIL collects the first six issues of the relaunched series. This volume also reprints two interviews with Mark Waid (one of which concerns his return to Crossgen's old RUSE series). Added bonus features present several variant covers, a sketchbook by (and interview with) Paolo Rivera, and a two-paged layout in which Paolo walks us thru his illustrating process.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible read, one of the best today!, February 2, 2012
This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)
First, speaking as a DC Comics fan, I didn't expect to actually like this book. Daredevil isn't one of those characters I consider to be an end-all, be-all of the Marvel Universe when there are more iconic characters around (Spider-Man, Hulk, Captain America, etc.). But this book took me by surprise.
Mark Waid is one of my favorite writers working today, so I naturally had to give this a shot when it came out. I haven't looked back. I'm now a regular Daredevil reader. Never thought I'd say that.
I don't want to spoil the story for you and I think it's been covered by other reviewers, I'll just put it as simply as I can: this is a great book!
It's especially great for people who might not have given Daredevil a shot before. It does contain some references to events that played out in previous story lines, but don't let that scare you off. Those events have little or nothing to do with what's happening now. This story is geared for those just getting into the Man Without Fear.
It doesn't mean this won't please long-time Daredevil fans, though. There's plenty of what made Daredevil fun and exciting pre-Frank Miller and even a little bit left over from the Miller time period. The manic depression has been sucked right out, though and replaced with something that's so much better: ACTUAL heroics.
It's not contained in this collection, but Daredevil #7 was one of the most amazing books I read last year. There's incentive to pick up the next volume.
If you like the fun of Spider-Man, but get a little tired of the self-deprecating humor or you love Batman, but don't want to be bogged down by loads of continuity or maybe you just want to find something that's both fun and thrilling all in the same place, do yourself a favor and pick this up. The price is pretty great for the hardcover edition, but if you're cheap like me, the paperback is even better on the wallet (or purse).
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24 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fresh new direction that holds onto a stale concept, January 28, 2012
This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)
I hadn't read Daredevil since Brian Bendis left the book and I heard such horrible things about Shadowland, but when Mark Waid writes a book, I just have to check it out.

Waid takes Daredevil in a new direction. Instead of a Matt Murdock who is grim, gritty, down on his luck, self-loathing, and holds a grudge against life in general, we get to see a cheerful, playful, "devil" may care, determined to be happy Matt Murdock, and it's great. It makes the book a lot more fun.

This volume is incredibly accessible for new readers. Waid keeps reminding readers of who Daredevil is, what his powers are, and the grim & gritty past that he's trying to let go. In fact, this book may be TOO accessible. Waid repeats these things frequently, leaving me to wonder how many times I'm going to have to hear how echolocation works during this series.

A plethora of background plots are the highlight of Waid's Daredevil: Matt & Foggy trying to salvage their law firm, the mysterious Fantastic Four artifact, and hints of a possible romance with a state prosecutor that won't stop calling Matt "Daredevil."

Daredevil Volume 1 is made up of two primary stories from Daredevil #1-6 (2011). The collection starts off with a strong first chapter that sets the tone and direction of the series. Issues 2 & 3 pit DD against Klaw, the master of sound, which is in theory a great villain for a hero with enhanced senses, but the script is a bit clunky, especially in issue #3. It doesn't have a good flow, there's a bit of technical jargon that doesn't make a lot of sense, and by the time the story was over I still didn't really know what the whole thing was all about.

The second story in issues #4-6 is better with a strong focus on may of the earlier-referenced subplots. DD's mission in this story is to help a young blind man who feels he was wrongly terminated from his job. A whole conspiracy is set into motion involving five terrorist organizations. It sounds like a leap, but Waid connects the dots in a way that flows naturally and it's a very good story.

Probably my favorite part of this volume is how reflective Matt is about his abilities and what he can do with them such as learning to play a musical instrument in a matter of moments or identifying individual strawberries by scent. There's also an awesome scene where Matt overthrows an entire hit squad with the flip of a switch.

One aspect of this book I can live without is the constant reminders that Matt Murdock isn't Daredevil. He is, obviously, but he's trying to cover up a leaked identity. This was a major story the last time I read Daredevil years and years ago. I can't believe it's still going on. The series really needs to move past this. It's stale.

At times I find the series to be uneven in pacing and energy. It may be because of the stale "I'm not Daredevil" reminders or repeats of details about echolocation. When I hit these scenes it's like someone tossed an anchor and killed the momentum. I also think forcing Matt out of the court room and turning him into a legal adviser works against one of the defining aspects of the character.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great new start for the man without fear., May 18, 2012
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This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)
Frank Miller took Daredevil to a dark dark place, but since then its never really changed. The writers have been using that same dark formula for years, but finally Matt Murdock has been born again as a swashbuckling, vigilante/lawyer/superhero that he once was. Its much more interesting now that Daredevil has been through so much over the years. Its like he can be that guy again, yet he is much wiser and more experienced.Its good to see Murdock enjoying life for once. I personally loved this book. It had a simple mystery story but with a lot of heart, humor and personality that is rare in comics these days.The artwork was interesting as well. It was pretty old school and was very nice. If you ever loved Daredevil, this is a must read/own book and I'm excited for whats next.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well written, Awesome art., February 28, 2012
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This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)
I got this in the mail today. While Im a die hard Spidey fan, Ive only read Daredevil on and off(Frank Miller Collections, Bendis' run, "The Return of the King") because it just wasnt....enough. Enough fun, enough story, enough action. It was so dark and noir-y that it just didnt work for me. Recently there was a Daredevil/Spidey crossover which required me to buy an issue of the current Waid/Rivera series and...wow. Just wow. I know that was Marvels plan in making the crossover, but it worked in a big way.I dont always like Mark Waid(Good on ASM, Okay on Hulk, bad at Avengers) but he has DD down. His take on Matt Murdock is the most enjoyable in years. Hes not grim and foreboding anymore.Or possessed by an actual demon, or running an international crime syndicate,yes these were real(and stupid) storylines past. Hes enjoying himself, and it shows. And I fell in love with Paolo Riveras artwork two years ago when he was a regular on Amazing Spider-Man. His lines are so clean and simple, yet his storytelling flows so fluently. And just look at the cool cover. He illustrates Daredevil's powers in a way I have never seen before(the radar sense especially, check out how DD sees the Spot). Plus the series is only at issue 9(8 was the Webhead/Black Cat crossover) and this collects 1-6 so its not to late to jump on. Highly recommend.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The new Daredevil, February 24, 2012
This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)
I have never read Daredevil before this series I'm familiar with the character thanks to the 90's Spiderman cartoon. What I really like about this book is it doesn't hash out another boring origin tale but it's still a great jumping on point. Matt Murdock has had a rough life up to this point and he's ready for a fresh start and a new attitude toward life this is why it's a great place to start with Daredevil because you're not weighed down by all his history because Matt is sick of living in the past and he's letting it go. The book does show you what Daredevils powers are and how they work if you're not familiar with the character. I enjoyed the writing and the art it's just a great book all around. I would recommend this book to any Daredevil fan as the character is taking a new direction under a creative team who are doing an awesome job. I also highly recommend this book to any comic book fan who would like to read a well done upbeat super hero story to get away from the dark and brooding character that seems to be all the rage right now. When Daredevil lays that kiss on the mob bosses new wife at her own wedding that's when I fell in love with the new Daredevil. Good stuff.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A New Start for Daredevil, March 2, 2013
By 
Adam (Boise, ID, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Paperback)
Daredevil's back and minus the load of depression. After three decades of gathering gloom, with the last dozen or so years being particularly intense in gloom, Daredevil is reborn under new writer Mark Waid.

While Marvel began the Waid run by relaunching the numbering system making this Volume 3 of Daredevil, Waid doesn't write the book as if the past dozen or so years of pure misery for Daredevil didn't happen. He acknowledges it.

In this collection, Matt Murdoch's got a spring his step. He's not Pollyanna, but he he's made a choice to be positive. In an important short in the first issue, Murdoch lays it on the line. The last few years are going to be rough, but he's going to choose to be happy. Daredevil features Daredevil back as a rough and tumble swashbuckling hero.

In some ways, the book is an improvement on the Silver Age version of Daredevil who was determined to defeat evil but was really a superhero for the thrills and excitement. Here we see Murdoch using his legal skills to help others. When public suspicion of his Daredevil career ruins his courtroom rep, Murdoch to teaching people how to defend themselves. He's helping people in need directly.

The only thing for parents of teens to be aware of is that the book has some innuendo and there's some violence but it's not as graphic as in the Frank Miller days. The overall content of the book is about that of a TV-PG TV series.

Overall, Waid shines a bright life brings back balance to a character that desperately needs it with stunning art, clever writing, and plenty of action and adventure.

Rating: 5.0 out of 5.00.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Devil may care, February 3, 2013
This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Paperback)
In this revamp Mark Waid rejects the popular version of Daredevil as this overly dark and gritty character and returns him to his 1960s roots with a carefree attitude, smiling as he takes down bad guys, and basically being an upbeat and cheerful sort of chap who enjoys being both Matt Murdock and Daredevil. This is a refreshing take on the character especially as dark and gritty is really something that's run its course in superhero comics and is generally something I'm sick of reading about.

Daredevil's usual nemesis Kingpin is entirely absent from this book, instead the baddies he fights are long-forgotten villains only someone with an encyclopaedic mind of classic comics like Waid could remember and resurrect for his run. Villains like The Spot, a guy who uses spots to teleport about the place, or The Klaw, a guy who manipulates sound and would prove a challenge to someone like Daredevil who relies heavily upon sound to operate. There's also a villain who likes to hit people called Bruiser. These villains are so-so. It's not that I'm against Silver and Bronze Age creations, I like the silliness of them, their garish costumes and strange motives, but they're very forgettable and insubstantial. Colourful obstacles but nothing more. It'd be good to see, not Kingpin, but at least a villain that can be built up over the series for Daredevil to fight, rather than these goofy guys.

As this is a first volume, Waid does his best to familiarise any new readers jumping onboard with Daredevil/Matt Murdock and his abilities. So there are a number of scenes where Matt is telling Foggy about his powers but the amount of times he talked about echolocation and how it enables him to be Daredevil became too many. It did lead to a good scene where he demonstrates how his superior hearing allows him to master a complex instrument like a violin almost instantly but, come on Waid, stop repeating yourself!

How the echolocation is represented through the art of Paolo Rivera and Marcos Martin is the best aspect of the book. Through innovative panels showing figures made up of a particular sound to illustrate how Matt "sees" them or through a kind of pop-art version of a street scene where words representing a sound or smell replace objects, they provide the reader with a unique and clever perspective on Daredevil. All this despite drawing Matt to look like Val Kilmer.

Waid does make a couple of questionable decisions that I felt were missteps. He takes Matt and Foggy from the courtroom and puts them in their office, coaching people who can't afford their counsel to represent themselves in court. So while the defendants are in court, Matt and Foggy are sat in an office waiting for the phone to ring with the verdict. While morally admirable, I felt it detracted from a key image of the character, of Matt standing in court looking like the real life version of the statue of justice. Removing him from that setting feels wrong.

Waid also decides to keep to Brian Michael Bendis' storyline of Matt Murdock revealing that he's Daredevil and then tries to retcon it. So there's a lot of "No I'm not Daredevil" dialogue from Matt throughout the book that I felt could've just been ignored. It was an idea that was explored but Marvel have clearly moved on so they should just pretend the storyline never happened and that, for this new run, everyone doesn't know.

Despite these criticisms, this is a pretty decent take on Daredevil, it's just not the game-changer I thought it'd be given the overwhelmingly positive response it's received. Maybe it's just because I'm not all that crazy about Daredevil as a character, but I thought this was a pretty average outing for the superhero. I might check out the next book in the series but the first book hasn't impressed me as completely as it has so many others.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Daredevil for those who want in on the Daredevil craze., May 1, 2013
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This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)
Okay, it is this Daredevil series that started the daredevil craze. Nontheless, This is a wonderful story on its own merits and will surely deliver, and satisfy any reader, comic or novel alike. Mark Waid brings a new take on Daredevil, and its one I'm surprised no one ever thought of until now. Marcos Martin and Paulo Rivera are the two artist for this first story arc and they also contribute to the quality of the title. They both bring a nuance and almost reinvent the way to draw Daredevil comics.

This is a perfect jumping on point for all new readers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Even Better Than It Used to Be, April 6, 2013
By 
Timothy C Allison (Louisville, KY United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Paperback)
"It has been a miserable last few years and every time I thought I'd finally hit bottom, God somehow found me a bigger shovel. All this pain and all this loss and...and I just can't bear the weight of it anymore and stay sane. I know that. So this is the way I've decided to be."

Matt Murdock's speech to Foggy is perhaps Mark Waid's statement of intent with his run on Daredevil. Acknowledge the grimdark past of the comic, while offering a dramatic change of pace and tone. It's perhaps a soft reboot more than anything, with past events staying in continuity, even while there's a change of focus away from that type of storytelling.

Waid's fresh approach to the title is in some ways a return to its silver age roots. Forgoing many trends of contemporary comics, Waid's Daredevil is a swashbuckling hero. His concerns are at a more human level, protecting the poor and disenfranchised, than with slugging it out with supervillains. The stories are shorter, punchier, and more self-contained. A reader doesn't need to know 50 years of Marvel continuity to understand the storyline. It feels fresh exciting and fun.

The art duties are split between Paolo Rivera and Marcos Martin. Their simple clean lines reflect this reversion to silver age aesthetics visually. The colorists, Javier Rodriguez and Muntsa Vicente, only add to the throwback effect. Bold color choices, often themed in red and yellow (DD's colors, don't ya know). The overall effect is evocative of the pop art of the 1960s, the era of Daredevil's birth.

I couldn't be more impressed with a contemporary comic. It has both the fun and energy of a silver age comics, but with the stylistic sophistication of a 21st century piece. Highly recommended for all ages.
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Daredevil, Vol. 1
Daredevil, Vol. 1 by Mark Waid (Hardcover - February 8, 2012)
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