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Daredevil Vol. 4: The Man Without Fear, Underboss Paperback – September 16, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics (September 16, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785110240
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785110248
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 6.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,057,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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A definite must read!
Ian
I'll also be looking for Mr. Bendis's previous DareDevil book, and the follow-up to Underboss, "DareDevil: Out".
Eric Wilson
Bendis and Maleev also give us a well developed plot and a diverse cast of supporting characters.
D. Sippel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 15, 2002
Using five minutes before, a week before inverse chronological style that made Memento such a heady pschological thriller, this collected storyline packs plenty of punches and twists, I had to go back three times while reading Underboss to see if indeed twists were hinted at. The gangland language is awesome or rather goombahrific, and the Kingpin as Julius Ceasar angle(though you know that Kingpin can't be killed off that easy, right ;) all makes for an entertaining read. My one qualm is the "silent" issue, where its all pics and no words(a string of these ran through all the Marvel Universe titles at the time) while still engaging, it was a let down compared to the rest of the stories since the dialogue in this book is so good. Bendis does a superb job fleshing out all the supporting DD characers like Ben Urich, Foggy and Kingpin's son and wife.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. Sippel on March 27, 2003
Verified Purchase
I was never a huge Daredevil fan, for no reason in particular. With the recent attention from the feature film, and my appreciation for the writing of Brian Michael Bendis, I enthusiastically dove right into "Underboss". Bendis is remarkable, bringing the reader right in with Daredevil/Matt Murdock's thoughts and feelings. Maleev's art is perfect for the portrayal of the darkness and seedier side of Hell's Kitchen. The city lives and breathes around us as we follow Matt through his trials and tribulations.
As much as I enjoy traditional superhero stories, I'm even more impressed with Bendis' intention of making sure the reader knows all about the man behind the mask. By making us aware of Dardevil's internal struggles and imperfections, I was identifying and empathizing with him all the way. After a certain point, some costumed crusaders can lose the reader by being too invinceable, too invulnerable, too perfect. Matt Murdock is a human being, whether he's in costume or not.
Bendis and Maleev also give us a well developed plot and a diverse cast of supporting characters. It's easy to envision "Underboss" as a gripping thriller of a movie, or a page turner of a novel. Congratulations to Bendis and Maleev for giving us such enjoyable reading. I look forward to reading the next collection.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vasconcelos Crisogono on February 10, 2008
Underboss is Bendis at his best. Here he writes grounded and realistic crime stories, even though the main character (to a certain extent) is a blind man in tights.

Underboss introduces Silke, a new player in the crime underworld, that will have a significant impact in Murdock's life by the time this story arc is over. Silke is a very interresting character, I only hope Bendis picks up on his storyline in the next arcs. The plot starts with Silke and some of the Kingpin's men betraying the blind Wilson Fisk Caesar style, while a reward is being offered to the man who kills Matt Murdock. What unfolds from the two plot lines is great and makes the reader want to read the whole thin in one go, I admit wanting to put it down, but not being able to.

Bendis makes this a realistic crime story, which is ultimately about betrayal. He focuses on Silke, Murdock, the death of Wilson Fisk and also has Vanessa Fisk playing a significant part in the story. Bendis writes some of the best dialogue in the industry, and his style of talking heads once again help the story a lot, since its mostly moved by dialogue. Bendis also jumps around a lot in time to tell this story and it works well, never leaving the reader confusued.

The art by Maleev is very good, his layouts are great and his pencils give the book a perfectly suited Noir feel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen B. O'Blenis on February 27, 2006
This writeup contains spoilers about the events that happened in the couple of years of Daredevil prior to the issues (Vol. 2 #s 26-31) reprinted here, so if you haven't read the earlier issues and are planning to, you may want to skip this review; the first issues of Volume 2 are reprinted in the Trade Paperback "Guardian Devil".

The Kingpin knows that Matt Murdock and Daredevil are one and the same, and has for quite some time (okay, everybody probably knows that one; it goes back quite a ways). But it, although the Kingpin's organization and Daredevil are constantly at war with one another, it's been a long time since Kingpin attempted to strike out at the Matt Murdock side of the DD/Murdock double identity. Quite a complicated relationship has developed between these two enemies over the years, and the Kingpin seems to have reached the point where he feels it's some kind of matter of honor to strike only against the Daredevil aspect of his nemesis; this in fact goes along quite faithfully with his character: the Kingpin is a ruthless, murderous individual, but he has his own code of honor that makes sense to him, and he prides himself and not violating it even when it would make his life a lot easier.

Here's the hook for the story: the Kingpin's men also know, with a fair degree of certainty, that Murdock is Daredevil, but they know their employer's general feelings on the matter and play ignorant. Into this scenario comes a breash, ambitious young up-and-comer in the world of organized crime, a new lietenant to the Kingpin named Sammy Silke.
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