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Dark End of the Spectrum Paperback – February 4, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 460 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (February 4, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441471685
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441471680
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,689,046 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Anthony S. Policastro has been writing all his life. The publication of his first novel, Absence of Faith, is the pinnacle of his work having previously published articles in The New York Times, American Photographer and other national, regional, and local publications. Policastro was the former editor-in-chief of Carolina Style magazine, a regional lifestyle publication similar to Southern Living magazine. He was a former journalist, photographer, and webmaster. The author's background is in technology, business intelligence, and communications. He lives in Raleigh, North Carolina.

More About the Author

Writing has been something I always did no matter where the winds of life took me. I always wrote.

It could be a paragraph here or there, an idea for a new piece of technology or how I felt about a particular political situation or news event. I feel I have this voice inside that is always trying to say something, get its message out, make a difference, enlighten, entertain or just make people see things a little differently. I think everyone has a unique voice, but some choose to express theirs more than others. Mine seems to be shouting all the time.

Words are powerful things - they change people for better or worse, move mountains, and cause monumental changes. Look what words did to Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare's words are just as powerful today as they were when he wrote them over 500 years ago. Imagine, writing something today that is so universal, so truthful, so inspiring that people still read it 500 years from now.

Words have that powerful effect on us no matter where we find them, in a book, in a magazine, on a computer screen.

Words are food for the mind. They make us think, imagine, dream, dance in the joy of the things we love.

When I write a scene I know that each one of us who reads it will see different images, experience a different experience and have a unique feeling. This is the power of storytelling. TV or video games can never awaken our imaginations like words do when you read a story. If you choose to express your inner voice through words like I do, then all you can do is write.

________________________________________

Anthony S. Policastro has been writing all his life.

The publication of his first novel is the pinnacle of his work having previously published articles in The New York Times, American Photographer and other national, regional, and local publications.

Policastro was the former editor-in-chief of Carolina Style magazine, a regional lifestyle publication similar to Southern Living magazine. He was a former journalist, photographer, and webmaster.

The author's background is in technology, business intelligence, and communications. He is the former senior business analyst for Lulu.com, the largest do-it-yourself publisher in the world headquartered in Raleigh, NC.

A member of the Backspace writers group, he has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Creative Writing and a BA in American Studies both from Penn State University.

His short essay on "What does it mean to be an American family" won in the Borders books Gather.com contest to promote the movie and book, Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri.

He currently writes a blog with Michael Neff, creator and editor of the Webdelsol and Algonkian websites, about writers' issues called The Writer's Edge. Policastro and Neff have been referred to as the Ebert and Roeper of the literary scene with their point/counterpoint posts.

He has two BA degrees - one in Creative Writing, and another in American Studies from Penn State University, both of which have greatly enhanced his writing career.

Born in New Jersey, he now lives in Raleigh, North Carolina with his wife. He has two sons and a daughter.

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
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The ending is horrible.
David Retherford
Poor characterisation, cliched writing, shallow characters who seem to make no or little sense in relation to each other.
R. F. Smallcorn
Very likely, this is the worst book I have ever read.
PaulDj

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Policastro on February 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
When planes start dropping out of the sky and when people and their electronic equipment - computers and cellular phones - are baked and fried from a deadly energy pulse, the CIA, FBI, Homeland Security, and the President of the United States discover they are helpless against their own technology, which has been commandeered by a group of terrorists and turned against them. Without any plausible way for the government to prevent the terrorists from destroying the lives of millions of people on the East Coast - unless the government meets their demands - Dan Riker, a family man and an IT Security Expert, finds himself in the middle of a technological war that will remind the reader of the many patriotic exploits of Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan. If you like Jack Ryan, you'll love Dan Riker.
Policastro's second novel, Dark End of the Spectrum, is a blockbuster of a story, with nonstop action that will keep you turning the pages. You will be swept away not only by the nonstop action that is typical of such authors as Tom Clancy, James Rollins, and Harlan Coben, you'll be captivated by Dan Riker's wife, Amelia, and his daughter, Kaileigh, who are abducted and held hostage by the terrorists to prevent Riker from helping the government. You will be reminded of one of the more classical and memorable lines of Bogart when he says to Bergman at the end of Casablanca: "The problem of three little people don't mount to a hill of beans in this crazy world." And this is significant because Bogart expresses the same sentiments Riker feels throughout the story, especially when he is forced to choose between saving the lives of millions of unsuspecting people or saving the lives of his beloved wife and daughter.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Anora McGaha on May 26, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating story; a page turner. When I downloaded my 99 cent copy on my iPhone via a Kindle app, it was the first book I ever read as an ebook, so the book had two tests to pass - that of a new author and subject area for this non-fiction reader; and that of being read on my iPhone. It passed both.

I loved the book. Loved the high tech landscape of the storyline - which I only partly understood, but didn't have to fully understand to follow the story; it kept me intrigued. Loved the unexpected artistic details, phrases highlighting something beautiful or pointing out a subtlety that made me respect the author's awareness. Loved the physicality of the story - the descriptions of what sensations the characters experienced, like the burning in their legs as they ran for their lives. And I really enjoyed the relationships.

The writing was so vivid I felt like I was watching a movie. (It would make an exciting movie!)

PS The ending caught me by surprise. I wrestled with it, and am still wrestling with it. If I were telling a fellow softie about the book, I'd say, it's a great ride, enjoy it, and maybe stop before the ending! (At least the ending comes at the very end!)
PPS I recommend reading the three reviews written previous to mine, as each is informative to a prospective reader in different ways.
PPPS It's a great read!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sheila Deeth VINE VOICE on June 3, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition
At 468 pages, Dark End of the Spectrum, by Anthony S. Policastro, felt rather long to me, but the pages turned quickly, even on a computer, and by the time the CIA arrived to take Dan away from his family on a sunny day off I was thoroughly hooked. I'm not sure what I'd have done then if my cell-phone had rung.

Dan understands technology. He talks about Ultra Wide Band transmissions and 512 bit encryption, and I wonder how out of date I am. But he's plausible and convincing when he describes the danger of secure networks being compromised by wireless devices. It's certainly interesting to see how we might sacrifice security for simplicity, and then to be sideswiped by the idea that we might have sacrificed security in the name of avoiding terrorism too.

But the novel isn't just about technology gone wild. Dan has a wife and child and a home life too, and the up-down relationship of a marriage strained by work grounds the tale very realistically. The author writes convincing dialog, and Amelia's sudden anger as Dan leaves to help the CIA saddened me because of its plausibility. It did disappoint me that Dan so easily attributes her outburst to her period. But then...

Well, then the story really takes off. DEWs and HSPs and other acronyms abound, but the reader soon learns to speak the same language. Dan runs for his life, not knowing who to trust, while the whole world falls apart. Cars, helicopters and houses are destroyed. People die, spectacularly. And, when the whole country is held to ransom, even the President gets involved.

Descriptive details and discussions slowed the story down at times, but not enough to distract me from reading on.
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Format: Paperback
I just cannot believe that somebody rated this book with 4 or 5 stars. Very likely, this is the worst book I have ever read.

This book is so disappointing that I almost feel cheated. The disappointment comes from the fact that the beginning is actually gripping. It is fast paced -as some of the positive reviews point out- and technologically interesting. The beginning. But then the story goes downhill, really really fast, and it doesn't seem to stop.

The English is bad. I don't know how many of you care about bad grammar, but I am put off when a book -for which I paid- contains all sorts of "you're" vs "your", "it's" vs "its" and that kind of mistakes. Example? "You're name must be a magic word like open says me" (literal), or "peddling" instead of "pedaling". Yes, the writing is THIS bad. Same for punctuation. Same for back-references.

The plot (implausible),... the technology (puah!)... the characters... It would really be a pain to discuss these aspects. Do yourself a favor, pass on this one.

P.S.: Ok, I get it now: one of the 5-star reviews is from the author himself!!!
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