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Dark Entities Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Regions Press; First edition (September 28, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1888993650
  • ISBN-13: 978-1888993653
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6.8 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,854,927 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Dunwoody knows what he's doing when it comes to writing good fiction...From the zombies Dunwoody is known for, to demons, werewolves, and things that have no explanation -- even in the horror realm." --Dark Scribe Magazine

About the Author

David Dunwoody lives and writes in Utah. His debut novel, Empire, was published by Permuted Press in Spring 2008, and he is currently at work on the sequel. His latest novel, "The Harvest Cycle", can be read at harvestcycle.blogspot.com. Dave is also in the process of writing a new book for Dark Regions Press.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Colleen Wanglund on September 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
In a series of books by Dark Regions Press called New Voices of Horror, the first installment is DARK ENTITIES by David Dunwoody. All of the stories deal with death in one way or another and Dunwoody does it well. The foreword, by James Roy Daley (THE DEAD PARADE) is creepy as Hell and made me a bit uncomfortable; a very good start. The cover art and illustrations by Thomas Moran are fantastic.

A stand-out story for me is BROWNLEE's BLUE FLAME in which Death witnesses something never seen before, and in trying to find out what it means Death sees how it will inevitably affect the human race. Another story I thoroughly enjoyed is THE ABBOTT AND THE DRAGON which takes a different look at the zombie apocalypse in both how it started and where civilization, or what's left of it, has gone. BIRTHRIGHT takes an interesting look at Hell, the fallen angels, and demons, and A CARRION TO WOUNDED SOULS is a very disturbing story involving a child murderer.

All in all there isn't a story here I didn't like. The only complaint I do have is that as much as I enjoyed the story SUNSET, I wish it had been a little longer. I would have liked more insight into the how and why of the circumstances of the islanders. Other than that I think David Dunwoody is a top notch storyteller with a vivid imagination. I highly recommend this collection.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rhys on October 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
First and foremost, the stories in this anthology are diverse in theme, plot, characterization and quality and there seems to be signs of improvement from the earliest published work included to those written for the anthology. This is speaking in general terms, though, as the new stories are in some cases as lacking as the earlier works. The quality fluctuates so much that I think, for the sake of keeping this review simple and to the point, I shall only focus on the two worst and two best.

The worst-In the Clay*2/5* and Carrion for Wounded Souls*2/5*

In the Clay-Incomprehensible and a total let down. The name suggests some large and formidable possibilities which are never explored. The name implies that the characters would be made of clay or some type of shaping of persons in clay, but the concept is barely touched on and it is not clear who the antagonists are or what they are. The dialogue is also the least impressive in this story. The proper story to begin this anthology would have been the second story, Brownlee's Blue Flame.

Carrion for Wounded Souls-this one started with promise with the introduction of the twilight man(I was under the impression that it was exactly what he was and the story would go in a dark science fantasy direction). However, the concept is never truly fleshed out and what remains is an odd being that is not explained entirely. The story literally hinges on what he is, but it is left up in the air and the sudden ending-which felt forced out after a smooth flow. The only sense that I could make of it is that the diction is also inconsistent, leaving the protagonist/antagonist sound indecisive and schizophrenic, creating the sense that his mental state is in the "twilight.
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By D. Anderson on April 27, 2013
Format: Paperback
I read this a year and a half ago, so forgive any details that may have faded.

Ok, so, great collection by Dunwoody. I like that a lot of the stories focus on creatures, we really do get to see some DARK ENTITIES.

Here are some stories I remember clearly, still, they were that good:

IN THE CLAY -- I found this to be a bit Lovecraftian. Has a bit of the 'waiting for the Old Ones to return' type vibe.

BROWNLEE'S BLUE FLAME -- Kind of a Grim Reaper origin story. Or just a thoughtful look at his reaperness.

THE AMBROSIA SUPPER CLUB -- Groovy werewolf type story. Memorable.

BIRTHRIGHT -- Groovy hell story. If you like demons and hell stuff, check it out.

THE RUN -- Another Lovecraftian type story.

All the other stories were fantastic as well, those were just a few. I dig this collection.

5 stars
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Format: Paperback
"Dark Entities" is a terrific collection of short horror fiction that I enjoyed a helluva lot more than I thought I was gonna. Not every tale is a home run, but most of `em are extra-base hits. ALL of them are worth reading, which actually says a lot.
Like many of us, I buy WAY more books than I could possibly read. But yesterday, as I wandered by the shelf lined with several Dark Regions Press books, this particular burnt-orange spine lettering leapt out towards me, and without thinking, I just put the book in my briefcase to take home.
As they say, sometimes the book picks you.
I tore through this set in a few, greedy gulps.
Personally, I find tone and style can go a long way in telling a horror tale, and I loved Mr. Dunwoody's tone and style.

A few noteworthy stories:

"The Ambrosia Supper Club" is a dandy "monsters versus us real folk" riot.
"Sunset" is a cinematic, bleak nightmare of an idyllic island vacation gone spectacularly wrong. Dunwoody here offers some of his best characterizations; this is one of the longer pieces.
"Birthright" is an interesting take on Hell...it's got a great sense of "place"...this one left me wanting more.
"The Abbot and The Dragon" has a "Walking Dead" vibe crossed with, believe it of not, a little "Jurassic Park."

Not only did I enjoy those stories more than the others, I kinda wanted each one of them to be a novella on their own.

As soon as I finish this review, I'm off to go check out more of Mr. Dunwoody's work...this is an impressive introduction.
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