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A Dark and Hungry God Arises: The Gap into Power Hardcover – October 1, 1992


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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Remember how the fairy-tale-ish The Hobbit morphed into a wide-lens The Lord of the Rings? Plots, counterplots, and intrigue galore await readers of the Gap saga, which is still picking up speed. Allusions to Wagner's The Ring Cycle in opening book The Real Story's afterword now become clear as Earth politicians, Holt "Dragon" Fasner, and the rest of the United Mining Company Police bureaucrats enter the fray. Morn and company still teeter between exhilaration and desperation.... even readers who don't care for action or space opera may enjoy a story with this forceful a meld of character, cabal, and adventure. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Although this third volume of Donaldson's projected five-volume space epic doesn't answer the questions raised in the first two books ( The Real Story and Forbidden Knowledge ), it brings many new, if unsatisfying, twists to the various plots and counterplots. And the scattered main characters--captured police officer Morn Hyland and rival pirates Angus Thermopyle and Nick Succorso--are assembled by the book's end. Nick, with Morn under guard and the angry alien Amnion on his tail, has fled to the pirate trading post Billingate, where he hopes to wheel and deal his way out of the mess he's in--even if this means trading Morn to the Amnion. Angus, meanwhile, successfully programmed by the police back in human space, has been sent to Billingate as well, ostensibly to sabotage it. But it seems that Nick, who sometimes works for the cops himself, was sent to wreak havoc on Billingate, too . . . and the convolutions don't stop there. By the final pages, readers may well have no idea who is doing what, or why, or at whose bidding. Original purposes are revealed as lies; new motives contradict others; unlikely coincidences spur major plot twists. But through it all runs Donaldson's trademark sadism, betrayal, amorality and purposeless cruelty, so his fans will hardly be disappointed.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (October 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553071769
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553071764
  • Product Dimensions: 4.7 x 1.3 x 7.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,244,407 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
All good myths (or operas, if you will) must have the characters travel into the underworld, for only there lies the key to solving the problems in the mortal realm. Billingate *is* Hades--take special note of the Bill's physical description and his manner of dealing with people. The Devil you say? I read in one review of person complaining regarding Davies' whining. Wouldn't you whine in his place? Milos deserved his fate--he sold his humanity years ago. Angus's walking crib is painful to endure, but his being let go is as wonderful as when Mhoram came into his power. Remember Mhoram from Thomas Covenant? I've always thought he was one of the truly great fictional characters. Notice how similar Mhoram and Vector Shaheed are? Donaldson continues to excel--each book is a masterpiece.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "general_geiger" on July 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
"A Dark and Hungry God Arises" is an expansion from the second book as much as the second is an expansion from the first. The structure changes from mostly-Morn-and-occasionally-Angus to swapping between many different characters over the course of the long and dizzyingly complex story. Donaldson's world expands to include politicians and leaders, both power-crazy and honest, all driving at their own aims and all caught in utter deadlock by each other. The theme of all the plots and complex intentions of every character in the book concentrating in one spot and acting like a "critical mass" is a good one, and gives a suitable background for a highly explosive ending. The structuring is brilliant - unfaultable, in my book - and if you try listing all the characters the story swaps between after you've read it, you'll find a couple of interesting "nuggets" for the really attentive reader . . . This is true of the third and fourth books, as well.
In my review on here of the second book in the Gap Series, "Forbidden Knowledge", I stated that my considerations of readers of a more squeamish disposition forced me to mark down. In the third book this is less true - the darkness is still there, but the utter horror of the second (particularly the "force-growing" of Davies Hyland on Enablement Station) isn't so much in evidence. Only one particular scene - where an important conversation is conducted to the background of a woman gutting herself for the pleasure of a crowd - is particularly vile. I think that is the only example of horror in the series which can be considered entirely gratuitous. It is unnecessary, and rather wince-worthy. That it elicits disgust from me is testament to that.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
Tension and plotting reach a high point in this third novel (following 'The Real Story' and 'Forbidden Knowledge'). Angus is reunited with the other main characters in a fantastic series of scenes, each outdoing the one before. Political intrigue merges beautifully with the stories of individual strife with a grace Donaldson's contemporaries should take note of.
The continous sequence of characters' schemes outdoing one another left this reader shaking his head in wonder. I may never reread the entire series, but I'll give careful thought to coming back to this one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 12, 1997
Format: Paperback
In book 3 of his Gap series, Stephen Donaldson ups the ante quite a ways. The first two books of the series were merely a prelude for this explosive turning point in the series. The plot is exceptional, Donaldson takes his main characters on a roller-coaster ride through the dark and corrupted Billingate. Unlike most Donaldson books, the plot can actually stand up and compare to his characters, which are still typically dark, brooding, and human
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dan on March 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
Well I will go against the grain a bit and say that I found this, the third of the gap novels to be frustrating and quite tedious. In short, Angus, Morn and Succorso find themselves fleeing the Amnion across the galaxy, while trying to decide what to do next, and how to backstab each other in the process. Other than that, nothing really happens.

I actually think that it was unhelpful to read of Donaldson's inspiration from Wagner's Ring (at the start of the first book). Basically the story revolves around three protagonists (victim, perpetrator and saviour) and the roles switch throughout the course of the story. With this background I found that it spoiled the story because all the peripheral characters besides Morn, Nick and Angus seemed to be ultimately superfluous.

Probably the most frustrating thing about this book in particular was that none of the characters seemed likable. Morn was just annoying, Nick turned into a jerk, Davies even more annoying than Morn, and basically all the other characters carrying around guilt and/or nefarious plans that did not endear them to me. In fact, the only character I had any feelings for was Angus, who in the first two books was a vile sociopath.

The other thing was Donaldson's annoying use of similies. I lost count of how many times Min Donner thought he hands were going to 'blaze like a magnesium flare', and the constant harping on about Angus and 'the crib' got really annoying. This is a trait in many of Donaldson's books. He just overdoes it. I'm reminded of the adage 'never use a big word when a small one will do', but Donaldson often seems to try to show off with is vocabulary, especially scientific terms.
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