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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on February 25, 2013
This was one of the most unique books I've read in a long time; in style if not always in content. As I read it, I definitely came to the conclusion I was reading some European author, as the style was so different from anything I had read in a long time (he's not :) ). The story is being told to the reader by a unknown, non-human source, speaking to us in this age of our own history and the lost continent of Atlantis. Often, the story's POV is a bird or a tree, or some minor character, sometimes never to be seen again. The book starts, unabashedly, with the fall of the ruling class of Atlantis, the Kai, and abruptly shifts gears to a village on another, less technologically advanced continent (Europe? Africa?). The book has some strong Star Wars overtones; the more spiritual, less advanced civilization menaced by an overwhelming dark force (Empire vs everyone else); the competing martial arts of the Ki and Kai (Jedi and Sith?); a young man of prophesy who could be savior or tyrant (Luke). There is also, seemingly, a commentary on Eastern and Western philosophy. What I found so unique was the author's patience in moving the story along. The book moves at a snail's pace throughout almost all of the book, sandwiched by two periods of insane, confusing action. Where I would have expected a montage or break to allow for months or years of training and experience to pass by, the book plods along in a very realistic way. People do not change with the turn of a page, and wisdom and knowledge are not gained by the start of the next chapter. Instead, we have stubborn, flawed protagonists, who could just as easily become antagonists in the next book. Any changes in the characters occur, for the most part, so imperceptibly, while we are so close, that I could hardly see it. The same lesson is repeated over and over again, as most lessons must be in reality, but is rarely seen in books. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing, as we tend to use books to escape the tedium of our lives for something more fantastic. Yet, the author certainly kept me guessing enough that I don't trust myself to predict what will be in the next books, and I am looking forward to reading what happens next.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on February 3, 2013
A unique and original story that was vivid, dark, but so full of hope and inspiration!
Enjoyed the writing style and especially enjoyed the relationship between Shinsei, Kieko, Aiko, and Kira.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on August 22, 2012
I saw the link to this book on another authors page. As I am always looking for new material to read in this genre I thought I would check it out.. I was not disappointed! At first I thought it would be hard to follw, being very long and full of lots of characters and history, but as I started reading, I found it easier to follow and became engrossed in the story of Kieko. The Japanese influence was quite interesting and enjoyable. Overall a good book...looking forward to the next one in the series
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2013
Dark Legacy: Book I - Trinity includes both a short novella (The End of the Kai) plus the first book of the Legacy series (additional books are still being written). Because I could read it on my ereader, I also downloaded The End of the Kai and read (and reviewed) that. The End of the Kai includes the novella plus the first three chapters of Trinity.

The End of the Kai is an interesting story and well written, however it leaves you wanting to know more about what will happen (or had happened since this all was supposed to have taken place thousands of years ago). The transition from The End of the Kai to Trinity was a hard cut and a little awkward if you don't realize that Trinity starts a completely new, mostly unrelated story. Elements from The End of the Kai don't really come into play in Trinity until the very end of the book. I'm hoping that more of the The End of the Kai story will be revealed in the other, forthcoming Dark Legacy books. Occasionally in The End of the Kai I found some of the characters, scenarios, and story a little confusing. It jumps right into a lot going on and there is a very complex social, political, and religious structure that is apparent in the Atlantean society, but for the most part the information unfolded in a way that wasn't too overwhelming. I do wish there was more substance to the whole story though to give more background, flush out the characters a little more, and continue past where the novella ended.

Trinity starts a completely new story set in a small village on the fictional(?) lost continent of Lemuria. At first I was wanting to know more about Atlantis, but quickly I got engrossed in Kieko's story. This is a story of a boy becoming a man, learning about mysterious forces in the universe and his relationship to a dark past through the teachings of a wizened master who encourages Kieko to let go of anger and darkness and embrace peace and light. There are plenty of similar plots abounding in literature, both past and current. But the most obvious parallels are the Star Wars stories, particularly the original trilogy that tells the story of Luke's rise from humble farmer to Jedi Master. But this is definitely not Star Wars. You won't read this and think "Hey, he ripped of George Lucas", but you will read it and think "That's kind of like when Luke..." It's enough to make you start thinking about how this story would look awesome on the big screen.

At times the pace of the book is very slow, but it never felt unnecessarily slow. As Kieko goes through his training and learning if the Ki philosophies you feel like you are also learning and going through similar training exercises. Concepts are repeated, but not in the condescending way some authors have of trying to make sure their readers don't forget what's happening, but in a way that makes you feel as if you are progressing through the training process with Kieko. It really is a fascinating ride and though provoking as well.

There are dozens of pages of glossary and character lists, and I read most of them and skimmed the rest. I'm not sure they were absolutely necessary since, as I said, most of the information is presented gradually enough to catch on, but it is nice to have the guides for reference. One thing I noticed is that some terms say to reference the guides in other books of the Dark Legacy series, books that haven't been written yet, so that was a little weird.

Overall, this was a great read. There were a few typos and grammatical mistakes; more than in a book from a typical mainstream publisher, but not enough to detract from my enjoyment of the story. Domenico has an excellent tale to tell and tells it very well. I am anxiously awaiting further installments in the Dark Legacy series.

>> As a disclaimer, I did receive my copy of Trinity for free via a Goodreads giveaway. I don't know the author, however, and my review was not influenced by winning the book. <<
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2013
I originally started out with the intro book: Dark Legacy: The End of the Kai, which is basically the first 1/4 of this book. After reading through the incredible blend of fantasy and sci-fi, mixed with Eastern philosophies, I had to buy the full book and finish it.

Without getting into details of the story, the book starts out with a flowing, poetic writing style which allows the reader to gain a lot of understanding about the world the author is envisioning, and draws the reader into the story. From there the reader is transitioned into a more tranquil story line to build the foundation of the rest of the series, and in the last part of the first book the writing crescendo's in fast paced storytelling, and leaves the reader at the end wanting more.

I'm anxiously awaiting the second book which is due out next year.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on September 3, 2012
Dark Legacy is a sweeping blend of epic fantasy and science fiction is written in a 'high fantasy' style. It begins with the destruction of the Kai Order, and the society they are tasked to defend, by the evil Maniok and his devastating armies. The mix of magic and technology by the author is compelling and effective as he describes in chilling detail the final stand of the Atlantean forces against their ambitious and ruthless foes.

In a faraway land, the son of the last Kai guardian is growing to manhood among a people who despise and abuse him because of his mixed-blood heritage. Here, the tale turns into a coming of age story as Kieko embraces the way of a Ki warrior and the mentorship of a warrior priest. He must learn to accept his past and seize control of his future, a destiny that has the potential for darkness and evil should Kieko fail to grasp the knowledge that his Shinsei attempts to impart.

The author has succeeded in building a rich and detailed world with distinct cultures, where the characters act in accordance with their personas and within the wider societies they populate. They are presented with great detail and consistency, while they also grow and develop as the story progresses.

Whether you are a fan of fantasy or science fiction--or even if you've never read genre fiction before--you will not be disappointed by Dark Legacy: Book 1 -- Trinity.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on January 17, 2012
Dark Legacy: Trinity, is a fantasy novel with a blend of science fiction that will appeal to both preferences in readers. It is a coming of age story of Kieko, son of the last Kai guardian of Atlantis. He is trained by the priest, Shinsei, as the relentless force that took Atlantis draws closer to his peaceful home of Ikishi.

The oldest mystics of the Orient against the pinnacle of human kind--Atlantis, fused together seamlessly. When the technology of science fiction clashes with a primitive culture, sparks fly. When it collides with rich characters who are rooted deep in their spirituality, then it becomes a battle of absolute willpower against a merciless evil. Add just the right touch of vivid detail, characters and story, and you have this epic tale that is hard to put down.

Kieko, Aiko and Kira are all lovable and thoroughly entertaining to follow to where their youth takes them next. As they become adults together, their trials and tribulations grow a powerful and unbreakable bond that the reader can easily connect with and follow alongside.

Domenico Italo Composto-Hart has made a most impressive step into the fantasy and science fiction genre. This first book of the Dark Legacy series will join my shelf alongside my all-time favorites.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2012
Dark Legacy: Trinity is the the first foray into the world of SF by Domenico Composto. To describe the book with a single word: staggering.

Detailing the clash of two civilizations, one technogenic and the other spiritual, this book is told from the perspective of a child thrust into the rural world of lemuria, grappling with his Atlantean past.

The book details the coming of age of Kieko (the child), as the two nations clash. The characters are believable, the setting is seamlessly integrating fantasy with reality, but the most compelling factor of the book is the atmosphere: at times frustrating, forboding or alternately light and full of hope.

At times, the book is nigh on impossible to put down.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on January 14, 2012
I am related to the author ;-) Science fiction isn't my type of genre, but after the first sixty pages I got into the book and discovered a deep spiritual Eastern philosophical side to the story. Now every time I draw a circle or write the letter O I am reminded of the void that is discussed in the book; it is the nothingness that pervades in all things. Very much a Zen concept. "It is from this nothingness that all things come from and return to." A deep and interesting reality to ponder.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on December 9, 2012
I was hooked on this book from page 1. It's definitely a page-turner... I couldn't put it down and am anxiously awaiting the rest of the series! I have been recommending this to everyone and all of my friends enjoyed it too.
Check it out! Definitely worth the read.
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