Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $1.92 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Dark Spring (Exact Change... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Crisp, clean, unread paperback with light shelfwear to the covers and a publisher's mark to one edge - Nice!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dark Spring (Exact Change) Paperback – October 1, 2008


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.03
$8.03 $7.80

A Spool of Blue Thread
The story of the Whitshank family told in Anne Tyler's hallmark setting—Baltimore. Read the full description | Learn more about the author
$12.03 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Dark Spring (Exact Change) + The Hearing Trumpet
Price for both: $26.31

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Exact Change
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Exact Change (October 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1878972308
  • ISBN-13: 978-1878972309
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #470,046 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

Preadolescent sexuality merges with depressive fantasy--to devastating (if ineffably morbid) effect in this once-notorious novel by a German writer and artist (1916–70) who, like this novel's young protagonist, took her own life shortly after its (1967) publication. She's a nameless suburban girl who's provoked, by her slovenly mother's indifference, her beloved father's long absences from home, and her own claustrophobic self-absorption, into masturbatory daydreams and tentative baby steps toward adult sexual expression. The story's (expertly caught) tone and rhythm are indeed hypnotic (though one nowhere senses the complexity attributed to it by translator Rupprecht's labored introduction), and Zürn caps it with a marvelously bleak, brisk final scene. Unusual and memorable fiction. -- Copyright © 2000 Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
60%
4 star
30%
3 star
10%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 10 customer reviews
This is an incredibly vivid and haunting book by a very talented writer.
Megan A. Burns
This particular work is semi-autobiographical and eerily foreshadows the writer's own suicide by defenestration.
K P Ambroziak
Would recommend it to anyone interested in the effect Freudian psychoanalysis had on literature.
Ronnie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Hencke on October 31, 2004
Format: Paperback
The ending of this book will I believe haunt me for days to come...One of the best novels I have ever read though not for all tastes. I found Zurn's writing hypnotic and mystifying. A dark and honest german tale of innocence tarnished, love lost, suicide, dreams, sex, violence, domestic hell all seen through the eyes of a lonely twelve year old girl. Beautiful, sad and and unfortunately prophetic - spoiler-(Unica Zurn, the author killed herself in real life). Anyone interested in psychology or stories dealing with youthful angst must read this gripping literary work of art. A masterpiece.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Megan A. Burns on April 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is an incredibly vivid and haunting book by a very talented writer. As a result of her life, her work seems to not receive the recognition that it should. The writing in this book is beautiful. She deals with the fractured feminine psyche piling on surreal images that create a nightmare echo that resounds from cover to cover. Brilliant.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K P Ambroziak on July 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Unica Zürn's Dark Spring is a haunting story about the debilitating confusion a child can experience when confronted with gender awareness, sexuality and abuse. This particular work is semi-autobiographical and eerily foreshadows the writer's own suicide by defenestration.

A German Surrealist, Zürn was a writer, artist, and muse. She was the prototype for Hans Bellmer's infamous poupée art. Zürn's ink drawings are some of the most striking images evoking the disturbed mind, and her writing is even more telling for sufferers imprisoned by their own hallucinations.

Institutionalized several times throughout her life, Zürn's work is replete with reflections on mental illness. Even within a state of clinical madness, she is capable of writing about insanity as though it were something she were observing from the outside, empathizing with it rather than being subject to it. Zürn reassures her reader she is aware of her crazy disposition and delusional fabrications, but that there is beauty in this unique state of being.

Like no other writer I have read, Zürn is capable of telling an autobiographical story in the third person without losing any of the first person intimacy. Written in 1967, Dark Spring is a surrealist text that speaks to the fusion of the dream world with reality, particularly the state of being androgynous. I use androgyny here with its Greek roots in mind, referring to its intentional marriage of andr - man - and gyné - woman. I am not implying that Zürn felt as though she were a man trapped in a woman's body, nor confused about her gender. I think she was highly sensitive to the anatomical, and spiritual, differences between men and women.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steven Davis on February 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
Dark Spring is a novella about a young girl whose unhappy life in a broken home leads her to retreat into a private world of romantic and sexual fantasies. The unnamed girl, said by Zurn to represent her own childhood experiences, grows up in Germany during and after the First World War. She idolizes her father, though he is absent more often than not, but despises her promiscuous mother. The girl comes to believe that desire is better than fulfillment, and happiness can be obtained only by suffering. She develops a series of elaborate fantasies in which she relishes being frightened and threatened. Her first sexual experiences reinforce the notion that to desire is better than to have. Being withdrawn and denying herself even the hope of gratification takes its toll on the 12-year-old. Eventually the girl concludes that suffering is the normal state of mind for all creation. "Do happy people even exist?" she asks herself. "Her crying becomes so intense that she screams."

Despite its unadorned, present-tense prose, Dark Spring has the intensity of a steady, wide-eyed stare. It is a brutal, unflinching look at childhood despair (and the despair of adults as well--the author took her own life a year after publishing this novella.) The author suggests in more than one passage that language is incapable of expressing the intensity of her grief. The girl and her playmates invent private languages to express sorrow and longing. This is indeed a horrific and disturbing work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kirk Alex on December 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
Unica Zurn had her problems, no doubt about it, but she was also a talented writer who had the ability to turn her pain and suffering into art. This sort of reminds me of that other gem on the same topic entitled THE BELL JAR by Sylvia Plath. I suggest you get it. Unica Zurn deserves to be read and remembered.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Dark Spring (Exact Change)
This item: Dark Spring (Exact Change)
Price: $12.03
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com