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Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead Hardcover – February 17, 2010


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Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead + Stephen King The Dark Tower: Battle of Jericho Hill + Dark Tower: Treachery
Price for all three: $54.87

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel; First Printing edition (February 17, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785129510
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785129516
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.5 x 10.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #94,076 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Peter David has had over fifty novels published, including Sir Apropos of Nothing and the sequel The Woad to Wuin, Knight Life, Howling Mad, and the Psi-Man adventure series. He is the co-creator and author of the bestselling Star Trek: New Frontier series for Pocket Books. Peter's comic book resume includes an award-winning twelve-year run on The Incredible Hulk, and he has also worked on such varied and popular titles as Supergirl, Young Justice, Spider-Man, Spider-Man 2099, X-Factor, Star Trek, Wolverine, and many others.

Robin Furth is the personal research assistant to Stephen King and the author of Stephen King's The Dark Tower: A Complete Concordance, which was published by Scribner on December 5, 2006. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Robin Furth was born and raised in Philadelphia and attended the University of Pennsylvania. While enrolled in the Ph.D. program at the University of Maine, she was introduced to Stephen King, who needed a research assistant. She has been working with King for more than five years and is now busy writing story lines and folktales for Marvel's forthcoming Dark Tower comic book series. She divides her time between Maine, the south of England, and Mid-World.

Customer Reviews

The art once again is fantastic and really suits the mood of the book.
Derrick O'Rourke
Just like in King's books, I find myself becoming emotionally invested in these characters and sympathizing with their individual plights.
Joshua Miller
This graphic novel is bringing us slowly but surely to the Battle of Jericho Hill, and the beginning of Stephen King's Dark Tower series.
Frank J. Konopka

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The young gunslinger will soon embark on his world-spanning quest to destroy his sorcerous nemesis... and Gilead is definitely doomed.

The graphic novel prequel of Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series grinds toward its inevitable end... and as Gilead and everyone in it is about to crumble, the story takes on the harrowing dimensions of a Greek tragedy. "The Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead" is filled with blood, tragic deaths, treachery, and evil magic -- and it's a truly brilliant story.

Roland wakes to find that he's killed his own mother under the Grapefruit's spell. Even though it's found that she was a traitor planning to kill her husband, he's faced with the gallows. But it isn't the last death that will tear Gilead apart -- Cort's investigations in Marten's room leads to tragedy when he's exposed to a poisoned book, and another of Stephen's ka-tet falls to the Slow Mutants.

As Marten's web begins to tighten around the city, others fall prey to John Farson's plots and die terrible, bloody deaths -- and Stephen Deschain is gravely wounded in an ambush. Roland and his young friends are called upon to save Gilead from the traitors that riddle its population... but they cannot prevent the death from spreading to even the most invincible gunslinger.

"Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead" is like tumbling down a steep, rocky mountain covered with briars and thistles -- everything just goes downhill, and there's a lot of blood, pain, misery and death. Reading this comic book is a pretty painful experience because our callow young gunslinger is slowly losing everything and everyone that he loves, and the worst part is that there are a few more issues to go.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Derrick O'Rourke on February 21, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this hardcover. We begin with an exploration of Marten Broadcloak & his past. It's a simple but enlightening enough tale. Then the fall begins. Noticeably enough the demise of Gilead comes from within. There are some real harrowing scenes in it and the pace is relentless. Roland takes a back seat of sorts & it concentrates more on his father for as long as possible. The art once again is fantastic and really suits the mood of the book. Overall it's a thoroughly enjoyable read & well worth the look for new & old fans of the Dark Tower alike.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rubik on June 29, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Having just finished The Wind and the Keyhole, wherein Roland's father is alive and well to send him on a mission directly after the events in Mejis, I was very surprised to see him die in this alternate timeline. Which is what I've concluded: Stephen King didn't write this, so it can't be part of the canon. Even though he is creative and executive director of the series, and the woman who did write it is his personal assistant and wrote A Concordance (the encyclopedia King used to keep all Dark Tower references in line), it's not Roland's true history. It's a very close and very similar world that reflects Mid-World, but it's just not King.

As for the book itself the plot was laid out nicely and the art is good, but some points were overly reliant on stark imagery without filling in the action in between. The battle in particular, not to mention the treachery leading up to it, were only given in snapshots. Apparently ALL the men were either traitors or killed before Farson's forces arrived; Steven Deschain's gunslingers are good but not good enough to spot an ambush (so, in fact Roland IS several cuts above the rest); and even though there are awesome deterrents to attacks on Gilead, no one has thought to keep them in good working order over the years.

All in all, it's a good plot. The writing is decent even with the holes left by the grandstanding art, which was also decent. But ultimately it's one or two Tower levels away from true Mid-World because it's just not King.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By N. Kunka on July 24, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
They changed the artist. Fail. This series is being written by Robin Furth, not Stephen King, which creates an understandable bit of confusion as to what is official Dark Tower canon and what is not (although King does give his approval to the series and I'm sure he's involved in the production somehow). Maybe, I just need to go back and reread the original novels, but I seem to remember Steven Deschain and his ka-tet dying differently than is being presented in the Fall of Gilead. That could just be me though.

This is, in some ways, entirely new territory for Dark Tower fans. The story being explored here is merely referenced in Wolves of the Calla, when Roland recounts his mother's fate, and cryptically mentions the Battle of Jericho Hill that claimed the lives of his friends Alain and Cuthbert. Here, we see what happens as events unfold in Gilead and learn a good deal about the most eventful and meaningful formative experiences in Roland's life: the death of his father, his ascension to dinh, and his failure to protect his father's city, the city of Arthur Eld, and his friends from John Farson and the Man in Black.

Let's face it though: Furth is not Stephen King, and though she tries to emulate him in box narration ("do ya kennit?" and such), she's just not him and hasn't found her own voice, to this series's detriment. The artwork in this volume leaves much to be desired, and it's fantastically gory (the death of Cort is gruesome to say the least). Perhaps the medium of the graphic novel doesn't do wonderful things for this type of story-telling. Furth does finally help to clarify a couple of things: 1. What happened to Gilead and to Roland's father exactly? and 2. John Farson is indeed distinct and separate from the Man in Black, a.k.a. Walter O'Dimm, a.k.a.
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