Customer Reviews


41 Reviews
5 star:
 (26)
4 star:
 (9)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This isn't just the beginning. It's the beginning of the end
The young gunslinger will soon embark on his world-spanning quest to destroy his sorcerous nemesis... and Gilead is definitely doomed.

The graphic novel prequel of Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series grinds toward its inevitable end... and as Gilead and everyone in it is about to crumble, the story takes on the harrowing dimensions of a Greek tragedy. "The Dark...
Published on February 7, 2010 by E. A Solinas

versus
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent, but not King. (Plot holes and Spoilers)
Having just finished The Wind and the Keyhole, wherein Roland's father is alive and well to send him on a mission directly after the events in Mejis, I was very surprised to see him die in this alternate timeline. Which is what I've concluded: Stephen King didn't write this, so it can't be part of the canon. Even though he is creative and executive director of the series,...
Published on June 29, 2012 by Rubik


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This isn't just the beginning. It's the beginning of the end, February 7, 2010
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
The young gunslinger will soon embark on his world-spanning quest to destroy his sorcerous nemesis... and Gilead is definitely doomed.

The graphic novel prequel of Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series grinds toward its inevitable end... and as Gilead and everyone in it is about to crumble, the story takes on the harrowing dimensions of a Greek tragedy. "The Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead" is filled with blood, tragic deaths, treachery, and evil magic -- and it's a truly brilliant story.

Roland wakes to find that he's killed his own mother under the Grapefruit's spell. Even though it's found that she was a traitor planning to kill her husband, he's faced with the gallows. But it isn't the last death that will tear Gilead apart -- Cort's investigations in Marten's room leads to tragedy when he's exposed to a poisoned book, and another of Stephen's ka-tet falls to the Slow Mutants.

As Marten's web begins to tighten around the city, others fall prey to John Farson's plots and die terrible, bloody deaths -- and Stephen Deschain is gravely wounded in an ambush. Roland and his young friends are called upon to save Gilead from the traitors that riddle its population... but they cannot prevent the death from spreading to even the most invincible gunslinger.

"Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead" is like tumbling down a steep, rocky mountain covered with briars and thistles -- everything just goes downhill, and there's a lot of blood, pain, misery and death. Reading this comic book is a pretty painful experience because our callow young gunslinger is slowly losing everything and everyone that he loves, and the worst part is that there are a few more issues to go.

Peter David and Robin Furth smoothly adapt King's writing into a spare, rough-edged elegance, and they know how to heighten the tragedy of it -- in particular, the destruction of the gunslingers and the loss of the last of Roland's innocence. In fact, the entire story of "The Fall of Gilead" is a shocking string of bloody, violent death -- it was pretty obvious that almost everyone in Gilead would die, but it's still massive shock whenever another gunslinger is murdered.

The artwork is, as always, is brilliant -- bleak, shadowy and locked in perpetual dusk, with bright splashes of red everywhere (blood, scarlet curtains, Aileen's poncho, the Good Man's mask, etc). And it's worth noting that Roland undergoes a change in these issues, slowly morphing from a skinny young boy to a chiseled, strong man. I doubt this was an accident.

This brilliantly dark, bloody series soars into the realm of tragedy in "Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead" -- it can make you weep for people who never were, in a ruined world that never was.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The end is nigh, February 21, 2010
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
I really enjoyed this hardcover. We begin with an exploration of Marten Broadcloak & his past. It's a simple but enlightening enough tale. Then the fall begins. Noticeably enough the demise of Gilead comes from within. There are some real harrowing scenes in it and the pace is relentless. Roland takes a back seat of sorts & it concentrates more on his father for as long as possible. The art once again is fantastic and really suits the mood of the book. Overall it's a thoroughly enjoyable read & well worth the look for new & old fans of the Dark Tower alike.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent, but not King. (Plot holes and Spoilers), June 29, 2012
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
Having just finished The Wind and the Keyhole, wherein Roland's father is alive and well to send him on a mission directly after the events in Mejis, I was very surprised to see him die in this alternate timeline. Which is what I've concluded: Stephen King didn't write this, so it can't be part of the canon. Even though he is creative and executive director of the series, and the woman who did write it is his personal assistant and wrote A Concordance (the encyclopedia King used to keep all Dark Tower references in line), it's not Roland's true history. It's a very close and very similar world that reflects Mid-World, but it's just not King.

As for the book itself the plot was laid out nicely and the art is good, but some points were overly reliant on stark imagery without filling in the action in between. The battle in particular, not to mention the treachery leading up to it, were only given in snapshots. Apparently ALL the men were either traitors or killed before Farson's forces arrived; Steven Deschain's gunslingers are good but not good enough to spot an ambush (so, in fact Roland IS several cuts above the rest); and even though there are awesome deterrents to attacks on Gilead, no one has thought to keep them in good working order over the years.

All in all, it's a good plot. The writing is decent even with the holes left by the grandstanding art, which was also decent. But ultimately it's one or two Tower levels away from true Mid-World because it's just not King.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A decent attempt to plug a big hole, July 24, 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
They changed the artist. Fail. This series is being written by Robin Furth, not Stephen King, which creates an understandable bit of confusion as to what is official Dark Tower canon and what is not (although King does give his approval to the series and I'm sure he's involved in the production somehow). Maybe, I just need to go back and reread the original novels, but I seem to remember Steven Deschain and his ka-tet dying differently than is being presented in the Fall of Gilead. That could just be me though.

This is, in some ways, entirely new territory for Dark Tower fans. The story being explored here is merely referenced in Wolves of the Calla, when Roland recounts his mother's fate, and cryptically mentions the Battle of Jericho Hill that claimed the lives of his friends Alain and Cuthbert. Here, we see what happens as events unfold in Gilead and learn a good deal about the most eventful and meaningful formative experiences in Roland's life: the death of his father, his ascension to dinh, and his failure to protect his father's city, the city of Arthur Eld, and his friends from John Farson and the Man in Black.

Let's face it though: Furth is not Stephen King, and though she tries to emulate him in box narration ("do ya kennit?" and such), she's just not him and hasn't found her own voice, to this series's detriment. The artwork in this volume leaves much to be desired, and it's fantastically gory (the death of Cort is gruesome to say the least). Perhaps the medium of the graphic novel doesn't do wonderful things for this type of story-telling. Furth does finally help to clarify a couple of things: 1. What happened to Gilead and to Roland's father exactly? and 2. John Farson is indeed distinct and separate from the Man in Black, a.k.a. Walter O'Dimm, a.k.a. Randall Flagg, a.k.a. Marten Broadcloak and not just another one of his alias's. Farson's role in the fall of Gilead and the fate of the Deschains is explained plausibly and with enough new material to keep Tower fans satisfied in the post-King era. He is a miscreant, a rabble-rouser and a revolutionary, an interesting character in his own right. In addition, the fleshing-out of Aileen, the only woman gunslinger continues, and her ties to Roland are further explored. To date, she is the only character outside of the Tower novels to be introduced by the comic writers. I'm on the fence about her still though.

Some interesting questions linger. As the ka-tet escape Gilead, the only survivors of a massacre as Farson's troops sack the city, when will we see the Battle of Jericho Hill? What role will Aileen play and how will they explain the fact that in years traveling together Roland does not mention her to his new crew? What role is Sheemie going to play before the end? And why doesn't Roland remember him? What becomes of Farson and Gilead once it is in his possession? Why doesn't he pursue Roland after Jericho Hill?

The series is good enough to keep me reading, but probably only because I consider the original a masterpiece of Fantasy/Sci-Fi/Horror/Adventure/Romance, whatever...as usual the Dark Tower defies classification.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A nasty case of prequel syndrome. 2.5 stars * spoilers *, May 23, 2012
2.5 stars - 2 for the nice art, .5 for the story telling

While some of the story elements are coherent and even mildly entertaining, eventually the whole thing just falls apart under the weight of prequel syndrome - X has to happen, regardless of whether or not it makes sense in the context of the plot devices we've put in place to make the story interesting.

The final parts of the story are inconsequential and ill conceived. Really? Generic traitors used to kill some of the greatest warriors of all time? Perhaps it could happen, but shouldn't in a good story. Then there is the building climax as the invasion begins, and Roland and his tet struggle to open the pits, and they succeed! ... but since the story has to end a certain way, the gigantic army of Farson (I thought the world had moved on and the land was thinly populated...) just overwhelms them.

I find it hard to believe that King approved this story. Then again, there is 'Maximum Overdrive'...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars And there they died upon a Good Friday for God's sake., April 18, 2011
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
Peter David and Robin Furth, The Dark Tower vol. 4: Fall of Gilead (Marvel, 2009)

No spoiler here; the title tells you what's coming, as did Stephen King's original novels. All David and Furth, who comes on board as a writer for one of the pieces here (she's been a consultant throughout the series), are doing is fleshing out what we already know. While I still wish they'd get back on track with the original books, the work is the same quality we've come to expect from the series so far, and it's enjoyable in that spinoff-series kind of way; not worth it without having read King's original novels, but valuable if you have. *** 1/2
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, once again., November 9, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
Fleshes out a lot of the back story from the novels that (if you're like me) may have been hard to visualize. The art is different from the other graphic novels, only subtly, but enough to make the whole series lose a tad of cohesion--just a tad. Nitpicking aside, another great effort on the work. The physical product is great also--brown hard cover, wrapped in a nice dust jacket--very cool for a comic series. If you buy one of the series then just go ahead and buy the rest because you will save yourself time and you'll be doing it anyway. They're akin to crack . . .or what I imagine crack to be like!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best One Yet!, September 26, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
I had to wait a full year since "Treachery" before I could get my hands on this one. And the wait was worth it! The Fall of Gilead is, so far, the best volume of the series.

The Good
-Brilliant art... again. The art in the entire series has been awesome, but this volume stands out. Some of the panels, the way they were framed, the colors...ooohh, I felt like I was reading a movie. Every tragic death scene is horribly memorable (Roland holding his deceased mother, bleeding Cort in his bed, Vannay and Dr. DeCurry, just to name a few) and Farson's massive army truly instills a feeling of hopelessness. Most importantly (and noticeably) in this volume were the character's faces. A few panels, such as Roland in the jail cell or Sheemie...wow.
-Story and writing: I was transported to Lord of the Rings. The same hopeless feeling, the intensity, the race against time, all of the right elements are there. Especially after "Treachery", The Fall of Gilead cranks the intensity up to eleven.
-The DT Universe: I'm in love with the novels, reading Fall of Gilead was like a family reunion. There is so much here, so many familiar names, Arthur Eld himself even makes an appearance! This volume made me realize how much I like Cort.
I love the additions to the universe as well, most notably Alieen.

The Bad
-So many people die... :-(

Get this book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some interesting revelations..., July 21, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
This book was a good purcase for me just based on the info presented in the Dark Tower vein that I didn't know before. I've read all the previous books and graphic novels and it was really cool to find out a little more about Marten/Walter/Randall Flagg/The Man In Black. That being said, now knowing his stature and breeding it's hard to believe his fate in DTVII!! I really enjoyed the story line and the artwork was top notch. It's worth the bucks...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Flawless Execution of Storytelling, June 21, 2010
This review is from: Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead (Hardcover)
I don't care if you don't read, or have never read, "comic books," or dislike fantasy, or hated The Dark Tower series as it unfolded Stephen King`s epoch, and oft-delayed, vision. I must nevertheless tell you this: If you appreciate great literature, you should be buying and reading and following Marvel Comics' adaptation of The Dark Tower. All of the elements of great literature--passion, tragedy, pathos, irony, and nobility--are included within, in great and equal measure.

If I may, please let me recap what the creators of Stephen King's The Dark Tower: Fall of Gilead--Robin Furth and Peter David in collaboration on the narrative, and Richard Isanove on the artwork--have been doing with this volume and the three that preceded it. Their intent is to tell the opening of King's opus in linear and in comic book form, with some additional first-class mortar added to King's solid brick masonry. The result is a story with which you may already be familiar, with additional elements newly revealed, all told from a new perspective and with King's approval and blessing. The result--with Fall of Gilead, four hardbound volumes to date, each of which collects a six-issue story arc as well as two sets of covers for each issue featured therein--is a flawless execution of storytelling born of concept, story, and art.

There is deep and dark tragedy within the pages contained between the binding of Fall of Gilead, and it is spooned out in heartbreaking, incremental pieces. Fall of Gilead begins with a crack or two in the foundation, which leads to other cracks, and then collapse. All of the above are occasioned by magic, bewitchment, betrayal, and passion. Indeed, it begins, as does everything, with sex, as the Magician, Marten Broadcloak, seduces the wife of Steven Duchain, Lord of Gilead, while she in turn is murdered by Roland the Gunslinger, her own son--by accident, but murdered nonetheless. The opening chapter, "The Sorcerer," originally published as a standalone work, serves as an epilogue, if you will, to Treachery, the volume that immediately preceded it, and as a prologue to Fall of Gilead. "The Sorcerer" reveals more, but not all, of Marten's grand scheme, providing additional and horrific explanation to what has gone before and provides the six chapters that, as published issue by issue, constitute the Fall of Gilead story arc. One by one, many of the friends whom we come to love over the course of the previous three volumes are irrevocably, horrifically lost, their passing made all the more terrible as much by the nobility of their death as by the offal-encrusted hands of those who cause them. Isanove's art is unflinching here. The unadorned cruelty of Broadcloak and John Farson, the dark lord who believes that Broadcloak is in his employ (and who may be in for a surprise before all is done), and the betrayal of Gilead are unflinchingly portrayed as well. As with the prior volumes, the script by Robin Furth and Peter David is the equal of the art, a seamless story that respects the original foundation while creating something that is new and yet familiar, like a ghost memory come to life.

Stephen King's The Dark Tower adaptation in general, and Fall of Gilead in particular, is nothing less than the dark matter of nightmare brought to vision.
-- Joe Hartlaub
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead
Dark Tower: The Fall of Gilead by Robin Furth (Hardcover - February 17, 2010)
$24.99 $18.29
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.