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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Home sweet home
Roland Deschain has suffered a lot and lost a lot in the last two arcs of the "Dark Tower" graphic novels-- and unfortunately he doesn't have an easier time when he finally gets home.

Picking up after the end of the prior arc, Stephen King's "Dark Tower: Treachery" brings our hero and his embattled ka-tet back to Gilead and more trouble waiting for them...
Published on April 21, 2009 by E. A Solinas

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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars To Short
The images are great, Mid World is very well presented. The only problem is that the story advances very slooooooooowly. I mean in 7 issues Roland and his ka tet are very introduced.

I expected more (this is the 3rd series in the comic after all). I think the guys at Marvel Comics are milking this story for all it's worth.
Published on May 18, 2009 by Rene A. Herrera Gonzalez


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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Home sweet home, April 21, 2009
This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
Roland Deschain has suffered a lot and lost a lot in the last two arcs of the "Dark Tower" graphic novels-- and unfortunately he doesn't have an easier time when he finally gets home.

Picking up after the end of the prior arc, Stephen King's "Dark Tower: Treachery" brings our hero and his embattled ka-tet back to Gilead and more trouble waiting for them. Between Jae Lee's gorgeously gritty, colourful artwork and King's almost Shakespearean tragedies, it's a moving piece of work that shows how Roland Deschain became the gunslinger anti-hero we know and love.

Alain and Bert are made official gunslingers, but are troubled by Roland's continuing obsession with the Grapefruit and the horrors it contains -- visions of the Crimson King, of a blood-coloured wasteland, and of his murdered father. In the meantime, their fathers set out to destroy Farson's gang, nearly costing one of the gunslingers his life; Cort's teenage niece embraces the life and practices of a gunslinger, even though she isn't allowed to technically become one.

Worst of all, Roland's disgraced mother Gabrielle (sent to repent in a nunnery) is seduced back into doing Marten's bidding, so he can destroy the "mighty beast that is the gunslingers." And after Roland almost shoots his best friends, he tries to do the right thing by handing the Grapefruit to his father -- but he already knows too much of the horrific danger approaching Gilead.

Most of "Dark Tower: Treachery" is the calm before the storm -- the forces of evil are approaching Gilead but most of the people there don't know yet. So while this is a slower-moving affair than "The Gunslinger Born" and "The Long Road Home," all the piece of an epic clash are clicking into place. And you can tell that this is not going to end well for the people around our tortured young hero.

As rewritten by Peter David, King's rich, old-time narrative translates well into comic form, almost as if he were conversing with the readers ("Now there are some who simply equate riddles with jokes..."). And his simple dialogue has a powerful sound, mingling Old West and medieval styles ("I have the rest of eternity to feel no pain. I'll endure what I must until then").

And since this is a King story, there are moments of sheer horror: the killing of Charles and his poor little baby, and Steven's ka-tet stopping a fatal wound with gunpowder. The inside of the Grapefruit is relatively tame, but the close-ups of the Crimson King are pretty nightmarish.

Jae Lee weaves a colourful, hazy painting around the entire story as well, with plenty of striking artwork (a naked, emaciated Roland hugging the glowing Grapefruit). He splits much of the narrative between where the good guys are (the dusty, rather run-down citadel of Gilead) and the bad guys' domain (blood-red skies, twisted trees, all-engulfing mist and the suitably reddish domain of the King). It's lovely work.

Roland really gets put through the grinder here -- not only is he haunted by his torture inside the Grapefruit and the loss of Susan Delgado, but he basically becomes a Grapefruit junkie. Alain and Bert get to shine as newly-minted gunslingers and steadfast friends, and Aileen adds a strong female presence to the cast. They need it, since the only other surviving woman is Gabrielle -- and it's hard to see how a strong guy like Roland could have such a pitifully weak mother.

"Dark Tower: Treachery" is the windup for a devastating blow, and its lack of a central plot is its only weakness. Glorious art, a scarred teenage hero and plenty of eerie bad guys make this a great adaptation.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "In a world that has moved on...", July 2, 2009
This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
To those not in the know, Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series began with one of the first stories he ever wrote, The Gunslinger, which would eventually be published in 1982 as a standalone tale in a post-apocalyptic world of a man in black who fled across the desert and the gunslinger who followed. But King had plans. Big plans. 33 years later, his magnum opus was completed with the release of the seventh and final book in the most epic undertaking of his extremely prolific career. His original notion was a The Lord of the Rings-inspired tale that would weave together genres of fiction and conglomerate them all into a single existing multiverse. I said "epic undertaking" already, right? Horror, science fiction, fantasy, and especially westerns served as jumping off points for the series' premise which then grew to include metafiction and eventually every possible work of fiction all existing simultaneously with our own world. You'd think the conclusion of the story would have been enough. But King is not only in the process of revising and rewriting the entire series to fix glaring errors that resulted from the long delays between books, but he has also teamed up with Marvel Comics to fill in the massive gaps in the origin of the series' protagonist, Roland Deschain, in style. The first arc in this prequel series, The Gunslinger Born, was little more then an abridged retelling of the tale told by Roland that takes up most of the fourth novel, Wizard and Glass, which set up the chain of events that would lead to the Fall of Gilead. It was excellent. The Long Road Home followed it up with a story that felt a bit uneventful and forced, but was visually as impressive as the first arc. Plus, there were mutant wolves. Awesome mutant wolves. With "Treachery" the event are now in full swing and writers Robin Furth and Peter David have really hit their groove and are back to doing the original series justice.

"Treachery" picks up with the young Roland and his band of friends (ka-tet) returning from an ill-fated mission that changed them all forever and set in motion the wheels that would eventually leave only a cold and broken-hearted Roland standing. With Roland being a mess and in the thrall of evil forces, much of the story revolves around the side characters which turns out to be a very good thing. Alain and Cuthbert receive their guns as payment for thier service, which causes a rift between them and their jealous compadres who have to face exile to earn that honor. Meanwhile the mentor of all of Gilead's gunslingers has a problem with a strong-willed niece who feels she is every bit the fighter as the men and dreams of being a gunslinger herself which is forbidden to women. Marten the sorceror, who is the ultimate Stephen King villain and has been in many books under many names (most famously Randall Flagg) concludes his complete seduction of Roland's mother, who is tapped while doing penance for her sins to commit the ultimate betrayal. Meanwhile, Roland's father, the leader of Gilead, and his company run into some serious trouble of their own. This is the most brutal entry into the series yet and features some seriously horrific imagery. Ever seen an unborn full-term child ripped from the mother's belly in a comic book? Damn. They are not messing around. This is definitely the strongest Dark Tower graphic novel to come out yet and is worth wading through the rehash of the first arc and the relative mediocrity of the second. Fans of sex and violence will be well-served and there is plenty for fantasy fanatics as well. With this set-up, the series conclusion "The Fall of Gilead" should be epic.

If you are unfamiliar with the Dark Tower series, you probably are not a legit Stephen King fan and I honestly can't tell you how much you'll get out of this comic series. The imagery is astounding at times and the story starts at the very beginning so I imagine so long as you begin with "The Gunslinger Born" you'll be fine, but there's no substitute for the original novels as far as groundwork for this comic goes. Mid World has it's own dialects, terminology, and culture that will make fans of the novels feel right at home, but the writers here were fairly accommodating in utilizing it in a way that is easy to catch onto so newcomers need not feel too intimidated. The big complaint with these collections is that they throw out the additional content found in the original comic issues. The stories and appendices are wonderful and do so much to flesh out the lore, culture, and history of Mid Land that I simply cannot believe that Marvel would leave these vital pieces of this series out. No way is any of these collection getting a perfect score like that. If you have not read the Dark Tower books, you really should. It's a remarkable series that sadly falters in the end, but is still an absolute necessity for King fans if for no other reason then it's sheer scope and ambition. Understanding those novels will certainly aid in your appreciation of this comic book series, but if you are like me and can't get a moment's peace to get into a full novel these days then give this series a try if your up for something different and cool that redefines classic western iconography and combines it with science fiction and fantasy.
4 1/2 stars, rounded down for skimping content.

"I do not aim with my hand.
He who aims with his hand has forgotten the face of his father.
I aim with my Eye.

I do not shoot with my hand.
He who shoots with his handhas forgotten the face of his father.
I shoot with my Mind.

I do not kill with my gun.
He who kills with his gun has forgotten the face of his father.
I kill with my Heart"
-Gunslinger's Creed
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beware of this Addiction, August 27, 2009
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This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
I picked up on the gunslinger series long ago when I was still in the military. The concept of the earth moving on and reverting to the old west intermixed tapped into my younger days watching westerns (which are no longer in vogue) and mysticism. I finished the last novel when it was released and felt a lot had been left out. Since then, I took a job in Iraq and was surprised to see that King decided to create a graphic novel that give more information about Roland's early years.

This is the third series I purchased. The first I purchased as individual comics and appreciated the sidebar information they provided in each issue. I purchased The Long Road Home and Treachery as combined novels. They didn't give the side bar, but the content is first rate. King has a way of building you up with anticipation for the next page then shattering all faith you have left in humanity.

I went home on vacation this past May knowing my son was just finishing up the first novel in the Gunslinger series and I told him I would bring my graphic novels so he could get a better understanding of the novel. Treachery arrived just prior to me leaving and I decided to read it once I got home.

If you are like me, since I had been away for so long there was a honey do list as long as my arm and so many people to see that I didn't get a chance to start reading until my last couple days home. This volume is very intense and provided more action and suspense than The Long Road Home. It also introduces Cort's niece who has fire and bravado. It gives quite a bit more information about Roland's mother and her tragic failings. I had to take the book with me to finish once I returned to Iraq.

When I called back to announce that I had arrived, imagine my shock when my wife was interrupted by my son asking what happened to the last book. He had read all the previous graphic novels and was dying to read how the third volume turned out. I ended up having to purchase him a copy and send it to him. I called him a few days later and we talked about the story for nearly an hour.

If that doesn't tell you how compelling these novels are, I don't have the capacity to explain it better. I am patiently waiting for the next volume The Fall of Gilead to be complete so I can find out what happens next. I now understand the crazed woman in Misery who went to such ends to force the writer to keep it going. Good luck dealing with your addiction should you start this journey.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excelent art, excelent comicization of a great book., December 26, 2010
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This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
If you're a Dark Tower fan who's interested in a visual representation of the story, or if you're a comic fan interested in getting into a non-comic origin story line I highly recommend this.

Stephen King himself stated that he somewhat regretted that Wizard and Glass was going to have to be a prequel for the most part, but that it had to be done in order to make the rest of the series work. In this comic book (really graphic novel) adaptation the prequel comes before the rest of the Dark Tower, as King himself wants.

The Dark Tower series spans so many interest, so many topics, so many works of fiction, from Stephen King and other sources, I recommend this series of graphic novels to anyone who is interested in any type of fantasy fiction, multiple universe theories, or is simply interested in epic storytelling.

I consider this a companion to the original novels, not a replacement (though it does stand alone quite well). The in world history and summarization section at the end of the book does an incredibly good job of describing All-World, the peoples, the characters, and the histories involved. Reading the back section makes the original seven novel series easier to understand.

Disclosure:
I was a heavy collector of comic in my teens, from about 1990 to 1995 or so, but getting a car put a stop to that. I started reading the Dark Tower during that time period. Even though I no longer collect comics (they're an addiction, like crack) I still make exceptions for certain special things. The Stephen King comics and the Tick are among them.

If you are new to the Dark Tower may I suggest reading a few other things first:

The Stand: Expanded Edition: For the First Time Complete and Uncut (Signet)
The Eyes of the Dragon
Salem's Lot
The Talisman

The Stand and Salem's Lot are absolute must-reads to make sense of the series, especially two or three novels in, which as of the time of the writing is beyond the point the graphic novel collections have gotten to. The good news is The Stand is getting the same treatment as the Dark Tower, so you can read that as graphic novels also.

Having some background on Star Wars, Harry Potter, Charlie the Choo Choo, and the Fantastic Four can't hurt either. (yes, I'm serious - but only further in)
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Return Home, April 13, 2010
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tvtv3 "tvtv3" (St. Louis Metro East Area) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
THE DARK TOWER: TREACHERY begins immediately after the events of THE DARK TOWER: THE LONG ROAD HOME. Roland Deschain and his ka-tet have returned home to Gilead after their adventures in Hambry with the Big Coffin Hunters. Alain and Cuthbert are to be made official gunslingers. However, Alain and Cuthbert are worried about Roland who is still obsessed with Maerlyn's Grapefruit, despite knowing how it is using him. Meanwhile, Cort's niece, Aileen Ritter, decides that despite the fact there has never been one, she's going to be a gunslinger. Rumors of war spread and Roland's father and his ka-tet set off to battle Good John Farson's gang. But as the title of the book makes clear, treachery abounds as Roland's mother, Gabrielle is seduced by Marten Broadcloak who convinces her to steal the Grapefruit and kill her husband if necessary.

I enjoyed THE DARK TOWER: THE GUNSLINGER BORN but was a little disappointed by THE DARK TOWER: THE LONG ROAD HOME. I wasn't disappointed by THE DARK TOWER: TREACHERY. The book is a little short, but the pacing and plot of the story definitely quickens, leading to what can only be a showdown between good and evil and one that readers should already know beforehand doesn't end well for our heroes. The story reads like a chess match as we see the pieces fall into place between Farson and those of Gilead and this part of the story has one kicker of a finale.

The art work is gorgeous. With the return to Gilead, the color scheme is more vivid in TREACHERY than in THE LONG ROAD HOME. In THE LONG ROAD HOME, there was a lot of crimson, velvet, brown, and blacks. TREACHERY covers the whole visual spectrum, illustrating once again the difference between the Affiliation (good) and Farson (evil).

I thoroughly enjoyed THE DARK TOWER: TREACHERY and look forward to reading the other volumes in the series as they become available. Recommended for fans of Stephen King's "The Dark Tower" series, those who have read previous "Dark Tower" graphic novels, and people who enjoy serialized comic books.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Highest Possible Recommendation, November 23, 2009
This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
You can't judge a book by its cover. Yet a picture is worth a thousand words. Indeed. The cover to Stephen King's Dark Tower: Treachery says it all: a young woman, in profile, pelvis thrust forward in practiced, deceptive, invitation, a six gun in one hand and another on her hip. The woman in question is the niece of Cort of Gilead, and she...well, let's not get ahead of ourselves here. She is but one unforgettable player among many.

Dark Tower: Treachery is the third volume of Marvel Comics' adaptation of King's epic tale of Roland Deschain of Gilead. Actually, adaptation is the wrong word. Robin Furth and Peter David are the tellers of the tale, Jae Lee and Richard Isanove the visual interpreters; what they do is not so much an adaptation of the story as a true "growing" of it, if you will, with King's guidance and blessing. The hardbound collection Dark Tower: Treachery is a gathering of the third six-issue story arc of this masterful, enthralling effort, a tale of dark valor, casual violence, misguided passion, foul murder, and (of course) treachery dolloped in heavy measure into a place where, as in our world, the forces of good are outmatched by evil.

Dark Tower: Treachery begins with the return of Roland and his ka-tet, Alain and Bert, from their sojourn against the forces of the Crimson King, a quest that has earned them the right to have the title of "gunslinger" bestowed upon each and all of them. Roland, however, harbors a secret. He remains internally in thrall to Maerlyn's Grapefruit, an orb he wrested away from the Crimson King; it is Roland, however, who remains in its grasp, haunted by unspeakable dreams; yet he is unable to surrender the Grapefruit to his father, Stephen Deschain, even as it devours Roland's body and soul. When Roland, at the prompting of his ka-tet, ultimately turns the sphere over to his father, however, his act ironically sets a chain of events into action that foretell ill for the royal family in general and Gilead in particular. Meanwhile, Gabrielle, Roland's mother, remains in the nunnery of Our Lady of the Rose, repenting her betrayal of Stephen even as she acquiesces to her involvement in a plot that is far worse than what she has done previously. Matters come to a head with the occurrence of the great banquet held to celebrate the coming of age of Roland, Alain, and Bert. Kingson, a sinister musician new to the court, seeks to wrest the riddling title from Cort, the formidable weapon master of Gilead whose mind, we soon learn, is the most dangerous weapon of all. Aileen, Cort's niece, seeks Roland's heart and guns of her own; her chances of obtaining either are equally unlikely. And Gabrielle, at the bidding of her diabolical lover, seeks to carry out the ultimate treachery against Stephen and all that is light.

The elements of Dark Tower: Treachery--the story, the words, and the art--come together exquisitely. There is irony and horror and mystery in every sentence and every line and every shade in every panel in every page. As with the first two volumes, Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born and Dark Tower: The Long Road Home, Dark Tower: Treachery transcends its own medium. It is something new, something different, a half-step beyond print or film into wondrous new territory. It is an encounter, an experience, you will not soon forget. Of particular interest to those who read King's magnum opus, or, for that matter, to anyone who has ever thrilled to a story well told, Dark Tower: Treachery is a masterpiece. Highest possible recommendation.

-- Joe Hartlaub
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4.0 out of 5 stars The world is moving on, June 11, 2009
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This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
This was the best of the graphic novels so far. It put Roland's fathers ka-tet on display, really emphasized how close society is to falling, and further examined Rolands redemption from the grapefruit.

The introduction of Aileen is a decent distraction. She was created solely as a character in the comics and was never mentioned in the novels. She's a darker reflection of Susan Delgado - having lost her parents, raised by an uncle instead of an aunt, wishing to follow her own path and not that which is expected of her, etc.

I'm curious and eager to see the series progress, since we've reached the end of where the novels account for Roland and his ka-tet, as well as his father and his. What becomes of Stephen Deschain and his ka-tet is never accounted for in the novels. We know he hands over his guns to Roland, but why? Is he retiring as a Gunslinger? Alain and Cuthbert both inherit an ancestors guns, not their fathers.

There's obviously a fast-track to the fall of Gilead, culminating in the collapse of mid-world at Jericho Hill. We know that happens when Roland is 19 or 20ish, which gives him about 5 years before he's on his own in a world that has moved on. It's bittersweet to read these comics - we come to know the characters better than ever, armed with the knowledge that not a single one survives the fall of Gilead except Roland. (ok, and Sheemie)
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4.0 out of 5 stars Aileen, the Female Gunslinger, January 27, 2010
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This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
The "Treachery" story arc of Marvel's Dark Tower comics features the best addition yet: Aileen, Cort's niece and aspiring gunslinger. Annie Oakley was one of the best gunslingers in our world, and the scene where Aileen bests Cuthbert is breathtaking. Once again, thanks to the creative team of Peter David and Robin Furth for fleshing out the alien, yet familiar, place that is Mid-World, and to Jae Lee, who creates powerful, dramatic (albeit static) images that stay with the reader. My only complaint (one that many other reviewers have voiced) is Marvel's criminal decision to omit Furth's writings from the collected versions of the Dark Tower books. Although memorable characters are introduced to the always evolving universe, they are just a shade underdeveloped, their back stories presumably told in the extra material. Unless Marvel (or Furth) are planning to release them as a collection unto themselves, it is unfair to make the Dark Tower junkie (such as this reviewer) to pay extra for the individual issues just to get them. Marvel needs to take a lesson from the Distinguished Competition and learn how to truly collect their stories.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dark tower, June 29, 2009
This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
The Dark Tower Graphic novel series has been very kind to this DT fan. I've been reading through the books for the last year, and between them, reading the comics. The artistic direction coming from Jae Lee is top notch. I've enjoyed him ever since I read his ultimate fantastic four story arch. The writing really fit's too. Furth put together the DT chronology for Stephen King, and King himself checks up on everything before publishing. I would have thought if was King himself, if I didn't know better. The first two installments were perfect, and this one is close behind, but it suffers from Two Towers syndrom. It's in the middle, between two great sories. No biginning and a light cliffhanger ending. Still, you can't enjoy the Lord of the Rings without Two Towers, and you can't (or at least shouldn't) enjoy Roland's early years without Treachery. Buy it. Enjoy it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Straying farther from the path, but still keeping the spirit alive., February 9, 2011
This review is from: Dark Tower: Treachery (Hardcover)
Peter David, The Dark Tower vol. 3: Treachery (Marvel, 2008)

Having established the tangential precedent for this series in The Long Road Home, Peter David and his band of merry men decided to try and see how thin the canonical line was in Treachery. Aileen, Cort's niece, is introduced; she wants to break the traditional social mores and become a gunslinger, while both Cort and Roland's father Stephen have their eye on her as a prospective match for Roland. As such, she becomes a major character in this story arc (and, we assume, in the foreseeable future). That alone isn't enough to push it, but the more Aileen interacts with Roland, the closer we get. Canon doesn't get broken in this volume, but it's obvious David (and King, presumably) are tempted... we'll have to see where this goes. *** ˝
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Dark Tower: Treachery
Dark Tower: Treachery by Peter David (Hardcover - May 5, 2009)
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