A Darker Place and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
A Darker Place has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: ELIGIBLE FOR *FREE* SUPER SAVER SHIPPING. AMAZON CUSTOMER SERVICE AND DELIVERY TRACKING.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Darker Place Mass Market Paperback – December 1, 1999


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.99
$3.78 $0.01
Audio, Cassette
"Please retry"
$12.00

Constant Fear
Constant Fear
Constant Fear "firmly places [author] Palmer alongside the likes of Harlan Coben and Lisa Gardner." — The Providence Journal
$7.99 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

A Darker Place + Keeping Watch + Folly
Price for all three: $34.38

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam (December 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553578243
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553578249
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (83 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #355,811 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Laurie King's 1993 debut novel, A Grave Talent, won American and British honors for Best First Crime Novel, and it quickly established a loyal following for her series featuring San Francisco detectives Kate Martinelli and Alonzo Hawkins. She followed up that early success with a clever expansion of the Sherlock Holmes mythos, The Beekeeper's Apprentice. That novel, and the three that succeeded it, partnered Holmes with Mary Russell--a woman very much Holmes's equal in spirit and mind despite her young age. A Darker Place is King's first book to break from these series as she continues to pioneer new territory between literary and thriller fiction.

The success of A Darker Place comes from its slow revelation of the back story, which illuminates the major players: Anne Waverly, Glen McCarthy, and the people of Change. King brilliantly portrays the psychological split that drives Anne to self-destruction, both in her sexual relationships and in her self-effacing work for the FBI. Though a respected university professor and expert on cults, Anne Waverly was once a cultist herself. For 18 years she has struggled with personal tragedies that wrenched her from that experience, and she has dedicated herself (through academic labor and her covert work for the FBI) to saving the lives of others who become embroiled in religious fanaticism. Now, despite a vow that she has ended her relationship with the FBI and its work in defusing cults, she returns for one last effort at the request of Agent McCarthy. Anne cuts her hair, changes her name, and gradually loses herself in her new role as a member of Change. But her investigation soon becomes a journey into her own psyche, into the dark places of her past, as she sees her own life played out again in the members of the cult. --Patrick O'Kelley --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

King, author of the Kate Martinelli crime novels (With Child) and Mary Russell detective series (The Moor), applies her renegade talents to a suspenseful tale in which a woman penetrates the treacherous realm of religious cults in order to save its victims. Anne Waverly, a professor of religious studies at a small Oregon university, is an erstwhile FBI operative whose traumatic past has shaped her skills for infiltrating fringe religious groups: 18 years before, her departure from a Texas commune precipitated a Jonestown-like mass suicide that claimed her husband and young daughter. Haunted by their memory, she agrees to investigate Change, a Northern California commune dedicated to rehabilitating troubled youths. But once inside, under the alias Ana Wakefield, Anne discovers that Change's leaders are modern-day alchemists, who believe that, with the right combination of elements, a spiritual transformation is possible; the innocence of children and a sexual union of yin and yang will detonate the compound with the desired apocalyptic explosion. King presents Change's leaders as neither simplistic opportunists nor frenzied maniacs, but rather as methodical true believers who inhabit an ambiguous and dangerous middle ground. Anne is equally hard to pigeonhole, a feisty, independent woman whose guilt about her family tragedy leads to a misplaced sense of responsibility toward two of the commune's young wards. Anne's self-destructive tendencies are deftly juxtaposed with her fierce survivor's strength, and her frank sexuality and emotional needs are refreshingly rendered. She is a complicated and enigmatic heroine who perfectly fits the task of illuminating the shadowy world of religious cults.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

One of Laurie King's best reads.
Lizanne C Gottung
While I thought the ending "went off the deep end," and was a bit too much, the author did lay the groundwork for her ending.
K. Durkin
I hoped for more as I read deeper into the book but bombastic as the ending was, it wasn't enough to save the book as a whole.
Denise Bentley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By JulieS on August 15, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Not only has Laurie R. King created two amazing original series, the Kate Martinelli and Mary Russell books, but she has written this riveting book as well. She is a master at creating suspense, not in a cheesy John Grisham way, but deliberately leaving you hanging at the end of the chapter so you can't wait to turn the page and find out what happens. This book has a lot of interesting psychological discussions of people involved in cults and shows the mentality of the leaders, and the followers. I think King is a very fair and balanced leader and doesn't make the mistake some writers would make with this subject by showing all cult leaders as amoral, or all cults as harmful. The book keeps you hanging until the ending, which is concise bordering on abrupt. I could see how some people were dissapointed with the ending because it was so curt, but in a way, that's more interesting than books with a long drawn out conclusion and typical "happy ending." King leaves it ambiguous and more up to the reader's imagination (or maybe open to a sequel, I'm not sure). Once again, Laurie R. King shines in the world of shallow popular fiction, outstanding among her peers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 9, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Laurie King has been one of my favorites, both for her tortured policewoman and of course for Mary Russell. Such chutzpah - to give Holmes a wife at his age! But the stories have a wonderful plot and sinister rise with anticipation. Thus, I started this book with grave (get it?) anticipation. The characterizations and character development is incredibly excellent. Ana is wonderfully drawn and executed and very believeable as is her FBI contact. The children, too. I kept wondering if I had missed a book of LKing's. Had she written one with these characters before? And it is not yet published? The flashbacks were too substantial and yet too wispy. If there was no previous book there needed more explanation. The plot was very suspenseful and I quivered with anticipation. I read very slowly as the evil got worse and worse. I did not understand why they had to go to England, I guess it is as good as Montana, but I think people are less likely to be left alone in cults there. I have reread the ending 4 times and still don't understand it. It just sort of fell apart. I need an epilogue, not just a pulse at the end. Something between Ana and Jason or the FBI man something. I will read it again, but will write my own ending.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 30, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have read every book by this author and enjoyed them all, with a particular affinity for the Mary Russell series. This book insulted me. There were 100 pages or more of setting up the characters, mostly unnecessary. We knew as little about character motivation by the time the book really started in chapter 8 as we did on page 1. I think the author had worked so hard thinking it all up, she couldn't bear to tighten up the story by dropping enough of the blather to help us love her characters.
I dislike books that try to impress with wordiness--did Anne really "fossick" through papers on page 53 and does anyone even know what that means or care? I love intelligent mysteries, but the mystery was sacrificed in this one for too much intellect.
I hung on for dear life, hoping for good things to come, and the book did get better, keeping me turning pages instead of tossing it away. Then came that terrible ending. What happened to Stephen, why was it necessary to have separate locations for this cult that seemed so unconnected, was greed the motivation or the desire for transcendence, if the latter, to what were they transcending? Why include references to coming events and then never speak of them again? And what happened at the end? It just ended with no satisfying conclusion. After all those unnecessary words at the beginning, surely the author could have spared a few for the ending.
Anne was a great character in a very bad story. I was so disappointed, I am writing my first ever review to rid myself of the lingering bad aftertaste.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 1999
Format: Hardcover
When I noticed that Laurie King had a new book out, I bought it without even checking to see if it was a Kate Martinelli or Mary Russell story. Both of those heroines are so satisfying that it really didn't matter which it concerned. Imagine my delight to meet a new friend-Anne Waverly. I hope that this is the first of many in a long line of Waverly books. King is an adept writer who can take you through the back streets of London with Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, modern day police matters with Kate Martinelli and her crippled, female lover, or - now - penetrate religious cults with Anne Waverly. Far from being a stuffy theologian, Anne is all too vulnerable to the task at hand. Male readers, don't be afraid to try this, or any of King's books. This is not a "chick" writer. I've read some of her other works to my husband, and he is as spell bound as I am. "A Darker Place" had me up until 2:00am several nights until I finished the last page.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 21, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I've enjoyed all of Ms King's previous works and A Darker Place looked to be another 5 star treat until the last chapter. The book ends as if the writer just got tired of writing. There are enough loose ends to weave a carpet. I understand that a sequel is in the works. This book absolutely requires it. My recomendation: wait for the sequel and read them as a two book set.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

New York Times bestselling crime writer Laurie R. King writes both series and standalone novels.

In the Mary Russell series (first entry: The Beekeeper's Apprentice), fifteen-year-old Russell meets Sherlock Holmes on the Sussex Downs in 1915, becoming his apprentice, then his partner. The series follows their amiably contentious partnership into the 1920s as they challenge each other to ever greater feats of detection.

The Kate Martinelli series, starting with A Grave Talent, concerns a San Francisco homicide inspector, her SFPD partner, and her life partner. In the course of the series, Kate encounters a female Rembrandt, a modern-day Holy Fool, two difficult teenagers, a manifestation of the goddess Kali and an eighty-year-old manuscript concerning'Sherlock Holmes.

King also has written stand-alone novels--the historical thriller Touchstone, A Darker Place, two loosely linked novels'Folly and Keeping Watch--and a science fiction novel, Califia's Daughters, under the pseudonym Leigh Richards.

King grew up reading her way through libraries like a termite through balsa before going on to become a mother, builder, world traveler, and theologian.

She has now settled into a genteel life of crime, back in her native northern California. She has a secondary residence in cyberspace, where she enjoys meeting readers in her Virtual Book Club and on her blog.

King has won the Edgar and Creasey awards (for A Grave Talent), the Nero (for A Monstrous Regiment of Women) and the MacCavity (for Folly); her nominations include the Agatha, the Orange, the Barry, and two more Edgars. She was also given an honorary doctorate from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific.

Check out King's website, http://laurierking.com/, and follow the links to her blog and Virtual Book Club, featuring monthly discussions of her work, with regular visits from the author herself. And for regular LRK updates, follow the link to sign up for her email newsletter.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
A Darker Place
This item: A Darker Place
Price: $7.99
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com