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Darren Waterston: Representing The Invisible Paperback – June 1, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Charta (June 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 888158624X
  • ISBN-13: 978-8881586240
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,793,420 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jacquelynn Baas (BA Michigan State, PhD Michigan) was founding director of the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College after having served as Hood Chief Curator and, previously, as Registrar and then Assistant to the Director at the University of Michigan Museum of Art. In 1988 she was appointed director of the University of California Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. Named Director Emeritus in 1999, she returned to BAM/PFA as Interim Director in 2007-08 and served as Interim Director for the Mills College Art Museum in 2008-09.

In 2000 Baas co-founded the arts consortium, Awake: Art, Buddhism, and the Dimensions of Consciousness, which over the course of its five-year existence generated some fifty exhibitions, educational programs, artist residencies, and two books: Buddha Mind in Contemporary Art (California 2004) and Smile of the Buddha: Eastern Philosophy and Western Art from Monet to Today (California 2005). She is co-editor of Learning Mind: Experience into Art (California, 2009), Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life (Chicago 2011), and Chicago Makes Modern: How Creative Minds Changed Society (Chicago 2012), and has published a number of essays, including "The Epic of American Civilization" in Jose Clemente Orozco in the United States (Norton 2003), "Unframing Experience" in Learning Mind (cited above), "Meditations on the Medium of Time" in Measure of Time (BAM/PFA, 2006), "Before Zen: The Nothing of American Dada" in East-West Interchanges in American Art (Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2012), and "Agnes Martin: Readings for Writings" in Agnes Martin (Tate Modern 2015).

Baas has organized over thirty exhibitions and has published, lectured, and conducted numerous workshops on modern and contemporary art and architecture, with subjects ranging from print culture to the Mexican muralists to Asian perspectives in European and American art. She was curator for the 1990 exhibition, The Independent Group: Postwar Britain and the Aesthetics of Plenty (ICA London; LAMOCA; UC Berkeley; Hood Museum, Dartmouth; IVAM Valencia); for No Boundary: Duchamp, Cage, and Mostly Fluxus at the 2006 Gwangju Biennale; and for Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life, which traveled from Dartmouth to NYU and the University of Michigan in 1911-12 and was voted "Best Show in a University Gallery" by the American Chapter of the International Association of Art Critics. Her latest exhibition, Berkeley Eye: Perspectives on the Collection, opens in the new building of the University of California Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in July 2016.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. K. Lidster TOP 1000 REVIEWER on January 11, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With his most recent project, an art installation for Mass MoCA titled 'Filthy Lucre', Waterston takes his artistic genius in new directions, creating a dark psychic mirror of the infamous Peacock Room created by James McNeill Whistler. A very close approximation of the original, this Peacock Room imagines the context that's missing from the Leyland project as a corrosive radiation. The bitterness and anger that Whistler made so public, enraged that Leyland wouldn't pay any more than half the sum he demanded after completing the Peacock Room without getting the owners assent, has ravaged the decadent Victorian beauty.

Waterston's gifts have never been clearer than they are in this excellent monograph, published by Charta. His work prior to 'Representing the Invisible', collected in his self-titled monograph from St. Ann's press, shows the artist at the edge of a breakthrough. Still relying on figurative elements, the nascent strains of pure abstraction are not embraced with the same confidence he demonstrates. It may represent a stage of transition, but the results are beautiful, nonetheless.

'Representing the Invisible' is Waterston after the revelation. Although it's typically listed as a softcover, the edition I own is a hardcover. At around 140 or 150 pages, it's not impressive in terms of dimensions or page-count, but it uses thick, high-quality paper-stock, is sturdily bound and well-designed. Out of 350+ monographs, however, it's one of my favorites, one I come back to time and again. Waterston's excitement and inspiration is evident on every mysterious canvas; revelatory images of things we've never seen, could never name; 11 dimensional reality, translated in 4, represented in 2.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By T. Bryan Morehouse on February 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
Whatever I might write about this collection of Waterston's work will pale in comparison to its incredibly astonishing quality. Merely the deep core feeling that seems to exude from every painting would be enough to fill one's mind with a certain dark joy and wonder, but along with the expertise demonstrated by his use of many techniques; his creation of mysterious, complex and gentle undulating forms; his blending of precision and anarchy; and his absolute mastery of depth and color... the resulting whole is exalted to stratospheric heights. It is both entropic and autotrophic. As a designer, I've found this work very inspirational, and as a quite poorly painter, I find it utterly mind-boggling. I might also add that the quality of the book printing and presentation is very high. I strongly recommended this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By lucy on December 24, 2011
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So beautiful, I could only imagine what it would be like to see his art in person. This particular book of his art is in amazing quality and has a lot of his work not just a few pieces.
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One of the most pretentious and disappointing interviews I have read in years. I am amazed that Waterston, a masterful artist, painter of magical images, would give away all his credibility in one swipe . The interviewer is 50% to blame, sure, but I really respected Waterston.
Still love his paintings and his space at MOCA this summer ( a satire
about Whistler's "Peacock Room"), but
please-stay away from those interviews!!!
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