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Das Kapital Paperback – March 2, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (March 2, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 145388632X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1453886328
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 6.9 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #65,413 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

A lot of the ideas in this book are still valid today.
chris
This version, the CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform version, seems an amateur printing with a blurry, digital cover photo.
James W. Ritter
This doesn't seem to be the full version of Marx's writing.
Brian Murphy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Brian Murphy on July 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This doesn't seem to be the full version of Marx's writing. However, I did not see it clearly labeled as an abridgment or some other alteration.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By James W. Ritter on July 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This version, the CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform version, seems an amateur printing with a blurry, digital cover photo. I returned mine, and recommend you consider another version if you value a real book and don't want what seems to be the result of someone clicking print on a PDF and having it bound at Staples.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Martin Asiner on January 4, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
When historians look at the impact that Das Kapital has had on world events, they tend to place it in a literary continuum that began with his Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right (1843), followed by Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, The German Ideology (1846), The Communist Manifesto (1848), Grundrisse (1857), "Theses on Feuerbach" (1886), and Das Kapital (Volume I, 1867, Volumes II/III, 1893-1894). What they share is the belief that history is a forward moving phenomenon with one stage leading predictably to the next. Further, Marx saw only a very limited number of stages. The first stage was the primitive hunter-gatherer one of the Paleolithic. The second was the centering of clans into tribes and tribes into small cities and small cities into larger ones and ultimately into empires. The third was the feudal system following the dissolution of the Roman Empire. The fourth was the mercantile/capitalist system that began with the gradual breakup of feudalism beginning in the sixteenth century. According to Marx, when he wrote Das Kapital, humanity was in the Last Days of capitalism. Looming inevitably in the near future was the coming revolution of the proletariat that would usher in a workers' paradise of a classless society. Where Marx differs from his predecessors (most notably Hegel) was how and why the current capitalist system would soon enough vanish. Hegel used the dialectic of ideas to nail down his thesis that the future of mankind lay in the gradual maturation of a Spirit that would infuse man with the driving force for change. Marx agreed with Hegel concerning the need for a driving impetus but disagreed about this impetus. Marx envisioned a world of a constantly evolving materialism that forced human beings to remain in eternal conflict.Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jason Spear on March 31, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a required text for one of my Upper Division classes. I would highly
recommend this version to anyone who is interested in learning about Marx, or
wants an understanding of his views on an effective Capitalistic economy.

It is a stunningly accurate critique of political economy as it was then and as it has
unfolded today. To conclude, for common misconceptions, Capital identifies the many inconsistencies
and problems of political economy in the realm of the Capitalist mode of production.
What it does not do is outline how to organize and make work a "socialist" or centrally planned economy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By César Takemoto Quitério on August 29, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Poor translation and readability (in the kindle version you can't access the footnotes at a click) for such a classic.
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18 of 24 people found the following review helpful By chris on December 21, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very interesting book. A lot of the ideas in this book are still valid today. An important book and a fascinating read an answer to the problem of capitalism, his ideas are sound. I do recommend reading The Communist Manifesto first.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr K Andzsans-Balogh on October 29, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
No value for money. A PDF file printed out, very poor quality. The size is far from optimal reading experience.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By MR D MCMILLAN on January 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
According to legend the boss of HSBC bought a copy of Das Capital (or sent a minion to buy one!) to explain what on earth was happening in the credit crunch. The people who run the economy haven't a clue as to how it works and have to go running to "The Enemy" to find out! This is a well-written and lucid exposition of the workings of capitalism.

Explaining the world is one thing. Changing it is another. Marx would probably have been disgusted by some of the people who have called themselves Marxists in the time since his death. Some have betrayed the working class, others have sought to lord it over them.

Don't let that blind you to the validity of his argument in Capital
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