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Data-Driven Services with Silverlight 2 Paperback – January 1, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1st edition (January 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596523092
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596523091
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,769,933 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

Data Access and Web Services for Rich Internet Applications

About the Author

John Papa is a Microsoft C# MVP, MCSD.NET, and INETA Speaker who has been working with Microsoft distributed architectures for over 10 years. He has enterprise experience architecting and developing with .NET technologies focusing on architecture, patterns and practices, data access and mobile development. John has authored or co-authored several books on data access technologies, is the author of the "Data Points" column in MSDN Magazine, has presented MSDN WebCasts and can often be found speaking at industry conferences such as DevConnections and VSLive.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 18 customer reviews
The book is very well written, and easy to understand.
Giovanni
There are lots of good books that cover the fundamentals of Silverlight, but this book goes deeper!
Erik Mork
I highly recommend the book for all Silverlight developers.
Shawn Wildermuth

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Techie Evan on December 25, 2008
Format: Paperback
While many initial books on Silverlight tended to highlight the ease with which one can create great looking animations and user interfaces, this book is focused entirely on tools and techniques for building and debugging data-bound applications with Silverlight 2 as the client. The first four chapters discuss in great detail various data binding concepts and how Silverlight 2's offerings are more limited than those available with WPF. Chapters 5 and 6 are devoted to discussions of building and consuming ASMX and SOAP-based WCF services, cross-domain policies, and new data serialization features available in .Net 3.5 SP 1; one key learning from these chapters is that Silverlight 2 only supports basicHttpBinding for SOAP-based WCF Services. The next three chapters explain how REST-based Services differ from SOAP-based Services, how to build REST-based WCF Services, and how to consume such services as well as RESTful Services available from Digg, Amazon, and Twitter using the WebClient class (a scaled down version of the full .Net version) included in the Silverlight 2 plug-in. Those chapters demonstrate how to issue GET and POST RESTful requests but only briefly describe the availability of workarounds for issuing PUT and DELETE Restful requests with no further pointers or sample code. The same chapters include demonstrations of how to consume responses formatted in XML or JSON using LINQ to XML and LINQ to JSON, respectively. The next chapter provides information on how to interact with Syndication Feeds, and the last chapter is a lengthy excellent discussion of how to use ADO.Net Data Services. Appendix A provides a Quick Reference on ADO.Net Data Services and Appendix B discusses a few HTTP Sniffing Tools that can be used for debugging Silverlight 2 applications.Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Neil Kimber on April 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book comprehensivley covers all of the important topics required for constructing SilverLight apps that are interacting with different data sources through WCF or REST. It provides very detailed information on the different techniques available. It includes a great chapter on using ADO.Net Data Services, including how to use the Entity Framework. Most developers will pick one particular data integration architecture and stick with it, this book will certainly help architects to make the correct decision and answer their questions regarding the different alternatives. A valuable resource.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By W. Simons on April 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
My favorite parts of this book include data binding and ado.net
data services. I did wish that john covered asp.net ajax a bit deeper
and went into sql custom domain modeling. John papa writes for msdn
magazine and his books and articles are a pleasure to read....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brian Peek on February 24, 2009
Format: Paperback
I've just started to dig my way into Silverlight 2 and this book has been invaluable in getting me up to speed on the technology. If you don't know anything about WPF or XAML, you may want to get a primer book to accompany this, but once you're up to speed on the basics, this book will take you to the next step of getting your Silverlight applications talking to a variety of services in a variety of ways. For me, the chapters on using REST services and ADO.NET Data Services (Astoria) were invaluable in getting my application going. If you want to learn how to effectively use Silverlight in a data-based application, you'll definitely find some useful information here.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By MEERIGH MOHAND on March 24, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I give the book 5 stars for the topics covered overall, but only 3 stars for repeating things over and over. If it were not to the source code excerpts, the book would be closer to a transcript of an SL class than to a commercial book.

To get an idea of how annoying things are at times, consider the following two sentences from the first paragraph in page 150:

"The ADO.NET EF is a far more powerful tool than LINQ to SQL, and it can easily create a domain entity model that is mapped to a database. The EF can easily create a domain entity model that is mapped to a database."

Other examples of repetitiveness include descriptions of cross-domain restrictions, binding modes, etc...
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tim Heuer on January 23, 2009
Format: Paperback
As one who interacts with Silverlight beginners and experts on a daily basis, I will tell you that the #1 questions are always with regard to accessing information (data) from Silverlight. This book covers all the basics and the advanced for anyone to really understand. Providing samples in both C# and Visual Basic, John does a great job providing the information you need to be successful.

This should be required reading/reference for ANY Silverlight developer.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Marcus F. Schluper on April 1, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book may be the best available at this time and I appreciate it exists already. But I could have waited another week or two to have it cleaned up. It looks like the author never took the time to plan where he would introduce concepts and hence ended up introducing them repeatedly. Or do authors get paid by the page? For instance, the concept that a DataContext for a control can be specified at every level in the control hierarchy above (and including) this control is mentioned SIX times (pages 27, 28, 36 (twice), 37, and 38). Explaining INotifyPropertyChanged and Binding Modes is important, but does it really need 21 pages to cover them? Do we really need an example with 10 properties (both in C# and VB) to get it? Couldn't the XAML (page 51) at least be clean? On page 101 he writes (no kidding!)

"This window will search for any service that exposes Web Services Description Language (WSDL), which makes it discoverable. Both WCF web services and ASMX web services support SOAP 1.1 and are discoverable, so you can find them through this window. You can add as a service reference from a Silverlight 2 application any SOAP service that is discoverable and supports the basic profile of SOAP 1.1. Discoverable services are those that support WSDL. These include both WCF services and ASMX services"

John Papa's articles in MSDN Magazine are of much higher quality.
So I definitely do not agree with others who claim this book is very well written. When I read the same thing over and over again I feel I am listening to a poorly prepared presentation, taking too much of my time. Hopefully next time the editors (are allowed to) play their role. The subject deserves it.
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