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Database Modeling and Design: Logical Design, 4th Edition (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems) Paperback – September 20, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0126853520 ISBN-10: 0126853525 Edition: 4th

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Product Details

  • Series: The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems
  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann; 4 edition (September 20, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0126853525
  • ISBN-13: 978-0126853520
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,727,236 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An explicit presentation on Business Intelligence is a major strength of this book. For beginners, there is an elegant presentation on SQL in the appendix and the book is supplemented by a detailed glossary. Exercises, examples and solutions constitute an important part of this book. This book is useful reading for both beginners and advanced users as the contents integrate elements that would address various audiences at different levels."
- P. Pichappan, Department of Information Science, Annamalai University, India

Book Description

Extensively revised edition of the classic logical database design reference.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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It's nicely written and concise.
Frank Cohen
The sections on transformation, 3NF, and BI (including data warehouse, OLAP adn mining) were clear, and a great "how to".
Dave Guevara
An excellent discussion of database design and modeling, practices and techniques.
J. Bean

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Robert J. Muller on January 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
I also am a reviewer of the book and an interested colleague. I've used this book since its first edition as my main reference on basic data modeling, and I have been happy to comment on its newer editions. This 4th edition improves on earlier ones by including the Unified Modeling Language (UML), my own first choice for a design language for data modeling. The chapter on the UML includes everything you need, but it keeps it as simple and straightforward as possible, making the material very accessible. The real contribution of the book is in the normalization chapter and in the excellent description and examples of n-ary relationships and the consequences of their multiplicities, a very-hard-to-understand corner of the data modeling world. The inclusion in this edition of material on OLAP and data warehousing is also welcome, though very limited in scope. Finally, moving the physical design material into a separate book makes this book much more cohesive and useful as a reference for data modeling.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Michael R. Blaha on January 21, 2006
Format: Paperback
I am one of the reviewers for this book, but have no connection to the authors, other than being an impressed colleague.

This is a well-written, solid book by knowledgeable authors. Based on my consulting experience, many applications fall flat because of missing or inferior database conceptualization and design -- the subject of this book. The authors clearly explain how to build a database in terms of Entity-Relationship modeling. So if you think you could benefit from some advice, I recommend that you consider Teorey et al's new book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Filipuci Bruno on June 13, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book can be considered as having been structured in four distinct parts.

First part, the introductory one, is made of three chapters starting with the description of the Database Lifecycle, from Requirements Analysis to Physical Design. Then, follow the Entity-Relationship Modeling and the UML chapters in which the reader is presented ER constructs and basic UML notation used in the following chapters.

Second part is about the core of the book: Data Modeling. Requirements Analysis and Conceptual Modeling are addressed in chapter 4.
Next chapter is about transforming the Conceptual Data Model to SQL and contains a very useful set of figures that summarize how different relationship types, i.e. one-to-one, one-to-many, many-to-many, are translated into sets of SQL table creation constructs, including primary and foreign key attributes. This chapter alone may be worth the price of this book.
Chapter 6 addresses Normalization. Expectedly, First, Second, Third and Boyce-Codd Normal Forms are explained here, without resorting to too much theory. Things are different, however, for the Fourth and Fifth Normal Forms, as a good understanding of MVD - Multivalued Dependency - and of related rules and axioms are needed to grasp what 4NF and 5NF really mean. These are the most theoretical 10 pages or so of this book.
In the last chapter of this part, there is "An example of Logical Database Design"; an insignificant chapter of a few pages long, based on a very simplistic implementation of the all-too-common "Retail Store" problem that barely translates into 8 SQL table creation construct sets.

Third part, chapter 8, is about Business Intelligence. It covers Data Warehousing, OLAP and Data Mining.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Frank Cohen on June 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book is now next to my desk as a reference text. It does a good job at explaining the basics of relational database models and how they fit into a modern business architecture. The authors obviously have a methodology that works for them and the chapters seem to be organized according to their methodology. They start with UML, analyze the model in UML for potential problems, then move into SQL, normalization at the SQL stage, and end with an example. It's nicely written and concise.

-Frank Cohen

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Carl A. Barlow III on September 2, 2009
Format: Paperback
I thought the early chapters had some good information, but it's information I can find in some other books that I've already read. Earlier editions of this book may have been there first chronologically, I don't know. I really have problems with Chapter 6 on Normalization: I think the main example (figure 6.2) is very non-intuitive (report_no isn't a primary key for the Report table--it seems to be a one-to-one relationship with editor, dept_no, dept_name, and dept_addr based on the small sample data). Additionally, the example repeatedly states that there is only one candidate key in this table. The data sample doesn't seem to bear that out. I also think it would have been better if the author had given an example of how a table might NOT meet the First Normal Form, rather than just starting with an example of a table that is. I think the definition of 2NF is imprecise, although the example and solution are correct. I think the whole topic (of Normalization) is covered much more clearly and realistically by Clare Churcher in "Beginning Database Design".
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