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Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One's Looking) Hardcover – September 9, 2014


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Crown (September 9, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385347375
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385347372
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (101 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #877 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Q&A with Christian Rudder, cofounder of OkCupid and author of Dataclysm

Christian Rudder

As more of our social interaction happens on social media, how much can researchers learn about us from our online interactions?

Well, they can only learn what we tell them, but in the age of Facebook and Google, that’s become pretty much everything. To the extent that friendship, anger, sex, love, and whatever else happen online, we can investigate them.

Your search history tells us what kind of jokes you like. Your Facebook network reveals not just your friendships, but in some cases the state of your marriage. Your preferences on OkCupid tell us what you find sexy, and your reaction to the strangers the site offers up tells us how you judge people. The articles you “like” tell us not just about your politics, but even predict your intelligence.

You fold in data points like these for millions and millions of people, and you start to get a whole new picture of humankind.

In Dataclysm you’re taking this flood of information and putting it to an entirely new use: understanding human nature. So what have you found?

I tried really hard to avoid the numerical dog and pony show. There are of course lots of interesting one-off factoids, but I mostly found what I (and probably you) have always known: that people are gentle, mean, stupid, lusty, lonely, kind, foolish, shrewd, shallow, and endlessly complex. Dataclysm’s central idea isn’t necessarily what we can see using big data; it’s the fact of the vision itself. That we can get real data on even the most private moments in people’s lives is an astounding thing. It’s like the second advent of reality television, but this time without the television part. Just the reality.

Are you worried about any of this?

I have mixed feelings about the implications. I myself almost never tweet, post, or share anything about my personal life. At the same time, I’ve just spent three years writing about how interesting all this data is, and I cofounded OkCupid. My hope is that this ambivalence makes me a trustworthy guide through the thicket of technology and data. I admire the knowledge that social data can bring us; I also fear the consequences.

You have a lot to say about race in the book, and you use data to shed light on the many ways it affects the way we interact with one another. What surprised you about your research in this area? Did you find anything unsurprising?

The data on race was surprising only in its stubborn predictability—for all the glitzy technology, the results could’ve been from the 1950s. I grew up in Little Rock and graduated from Central High, the first school in the South to be integrated: Eisenhower, the National Guard, mobs of white people screaming at nine black children, that’s Central. The school embraces its history and is now over half black. I’m no brave crusader, but race (and racism) were part of my education. So when, in researching the book, I unpacked three separate databases and found that in every one white people gave black people short-shrift, I wasn’t shocked, you know? Asians and Latinos apply the same penalty to African Americans that white folks do, which says something about how even (relatively) recent additions to the “American experience” have acquired its biases.

What makes this moment in time—and this set of data—different from the massive data surveys of the past, such as Pew, Gallup, or the Kinsey Institute?

The data in my book is almost all passively observed—there’s no questionnaire, no contrived experiment to simulate “real life.” This data is real life. Online you have friends, lovers, enemies, and intense moments of truth without a thought for who’s watching, because ostensibly no one is—except of course the computers recording it all. This is how digital data circumvents that old research obstacle: people’s inability to be honest when the truth makes them look bad. Digital data’s ability to get at the private mind like this is unprecedented and very powerful.

Review

"Most data-hyping books are vapor and slogans. This one has the real stuff: actual data and actual analysis taking place on the page. That’s something to be praised, loudly and at length. Praiseworthy, too, is Rudder’s writing, which is consistently zingy and mercifully free of Silicon Valley business gabble."
Jordan Ellenberg, Washington Post

"As a researcher, Mr. Rudder clearly possesses the statistical acumen to answer the questions he has posed so well. As a writer, he keeps the book moving while fully exploring each topic, revealing his graphs and charts with both explanatory and narrative skill. Though he forgoes statistical particulars like p-values and confidence intervals, he gives an approachable, persuasive account of his data sources and results. He offers explanations of what the data can and cannot tell us, why it is sufficient or insufficient to answer some question we may have and, if the latter is the case, what sufficient data would look like. He shows you, in short, how to think about data."
—Wall Street Journal

"Rudder is the co-founder of the dating site OKCupid and the data scientist behind its now-legendary trend analyses, but he is also — as it becomes immediately clear from his elegant writing and wildly cross-disciplinary references — a lover of literature, philosophy, anthropology, and all the other humanities that make us human and that, importantly in this case, enhance and ennoble the hard data with dimensional insight into the richness of the human experience...an extraordinarily unusual and dimensional lens on what Carl Sagan memorably called ‘the aggregate of our joy and suffering.’"
—Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

"Fascinating, funny, and occasionally howl-inducing...[Rudder] is a quant with soul, and we’re lucky to have him."
—Elle
 
"There's another side of Big Data you haven't seen—not the one that promised to use our digital world to our advantage to optimize, monetize, or systematize every last part our lives. It's the big data that rears its ugly head and tells us what we don't want to know. And that, as Christian Rudder demonstrates in his new book, Dataclysm, is perhaps an equally worthwhile pursuit. Before we heighten the human experience, we should understand it first."
—TIME

"At a time when consumers are increasingly wary of online tracking, Rudder makes a powerful argument in Dataclysm that the ability to tell so much about us from the trails we leave is as potentially useful as it is pernicious, and as educational as it may be unsettling. By explaining some of the insights he has gleaned from OkCupid and other social networks, he demystifies data-mining and sheds light on what, for better or for worse, it is now capable of."
—Financial Times

"Dataclysm is a well-written and funny look at what the numbers reveal about human behavior in the age of social media. It’s both profound and a bit disturbing, because, sad to say, we’re generally not the kind of people we like to think — or say — we are."
—Salon

"For all its data and its seemingly dating-specific focus, Dataclysm tells the story set forth by the book's subtitle, in an entertaining and accessible way. Informative, eye-opening, and (gasp) fun to read. Even if you’re not a giant stat head."
Grantland

"[Rudder] doesn’t wring or clap his hands over the big-data phenomenon (see N.S.A., Google ads, that sneaky Fitbit) so much as plunge them into big data and attempt to pull strange creatures from the murky depths." 
The New Yorker

"A hopeful and exciting journey into the heart of data collection...[Rudder's] book delivers both insider access and a savvy critique of the very machinery he is employed by. Since he's been in the data mines and has risen above them, Rudder becomes a singular and trustworthy guide.
—The Globe and Mail

"Compulsively readable — including for those with no particular affinity for numbers in and of themselves — and surprisingly personal. Starting with aggregates, Rudder posits, we can zoom in on the details of how we live, love, fight, work, play, and age; from numbers, we can derive narrative. There are few characters in the book, and few anecdotes — but the human story resounds throughout."
Refinery29

"Rudder’s lively, clear prose…makes heady concepts understandable and transforms the book’s many charts into revealing truths…Rudder teaches us a bit about how wonderfully peculiar humans are, and how we go about hiding it."
—Flavorwire

"Dataclysm is all about what we can learn about human minds and hearts by analyzing the massive ongoing experiment that is the internet."
Forbes

"The book reads as if it's written (well) by a curious child whose parents beg him or her to stop asking "what-if" questions. Rudder examines the data of the website he helped create with unwavering curiosity. Every turn presents new questions to be answered, and he happily heads down the rabbit hole to resolve them."
—U.S. News

"This is the best book that I've read on data in years, perhaps ever. If you want to understand how data is affecting the present and what it portends for the future, buy it now."
—Huffington Post

"Rudder draws from big data sets – Google searches, Twitter updates, illicitly obtained Facebook data passed shiftily between researchers like bags of weed – to draw out subtle patterns in politics, sexuality, identity and behaviour that are only revealed with distance and aggregation…Dataclysm will entertain those who want to know how machines see us. It also serves as a call to action, showing us how server farms running everything from home shopping to homeland security turn us into easily digested data products. Rudder's message is clear: in this particular sausage factory, we are the pigs.” 
New Scientist

"Studying human behavior is a little like exploring a jungle: it's messy, hard, and easy to lose your way. But Christian Rudder is a consummate guide, revealing essential truths about who we are. Big Data has never been so fun."
—Dan Ariely, author of Predictably Irrational
 
"Dataclysm is a book full of juicy secrets—secrets about who we love, what we crave, why we like, and how we change each other’s minds and lives, often without even knowing it. Christian Rudder makes this mathematical narrative of our culture fun to read and even more fun to discuss: You will find yourself sharing these intriguing data-driven revelations with everyone you know."
—Jane McGonigal, author of Reality Is Broken
 
"In the first few pages of Dataclysm, Christian Rudder uses massive amounts of actual behavioral data to prove what I always believed in my heart: Belle and Sebastian is the whitest band ever. It only gets better from there."
—Aziz Ansari

"It’s unheard of for a book about Big Data to read like a guilty pleasure, but Dataclysm does. It’s a fascinating, almost voyeuristic look at who we really are and what we really want."
—Steven Strogatz, Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics, Cornell University, author of The Joy of x

"Smart, revealing, and sometimes sobering, Dataclysm affirms what we probably suspected in our darker moments: When it comes to romance, what we say we want isn't what will actually make us happy. Christian Rudder has tapped the tremendous wealth of data that the Internet offers to tease out thoughts on topics like beauty and race that most of us wouldn’t cop to publicly. It's a riveting read, and Rudder is an affable and humane guide."
—Adelle Waldman, author of The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.

"Christian Rudder has written a funny and profound book about important issues. Race, love, sex—you name it. Are we the sum of the data we produce? Read this book immediately and see if you can answer the question."
—Errol Morris

"Big Data can be like a 3D movie without 3D glasses—you know there's a lot going on but you're mainly just disoriented. We should feel fortunate to have an interpreter as skilled (and funny) as Christian Rudder. Dataclysm is filled with insights that boil down Big Data into byte-sized revelations."
—Michael Norton, Harvard Business School, coauthor of Happy Money

"With a zest for both the profound and the wacky, Rudder demonstrates how the information we provide individually tells a vast deal about who we are collectively. A visually engaging read and a fascinating topic make this a great choice not just for followers of Nate Silver and fans of infographics, but for just about anyone who, by participating in online activity, has contributed to the data set."
—Library Journal

"Demographers, entrepreneurs, students of history and sociology, and ordinary citizens alike will find plenty of provocations and, yes, much data in Rudder's well-argued, revealing pages."
—Kirkus Reviews

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Customer Reviews

Overall, I found the book interesting and very easy to read.
Anderson
Well written and entertaining, I recommend this book to anyone who loves research, interesting tidbits or just good reading in general.
Lauri Crumley Coates
Probably the most interesting and thought-provoking book I've read in a long time.
Gavin Scott

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Gavin Scott on July 29, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book may be to Data Science and Big Data what Freakonomics was to Economics.

The author is one of the founders of the dating web site OKCupid and has spent a lot of time sifting through the vast amount of data collected by user interactions with their website and each other, and he uses this wealth of personal and private information to explore what it can tell us about human social behavior.

The writing is excellent and it is a very fun read (I was hooked by the second page of the introduction, finished it in a couple sittings, and was never bored).

There's lots of information in this book that will make you think, and a lot worth talking about more. I think it's at its best in the first part where the theme is "things that bring us together" and he talks about statistics relating to how people find each other on his dating site. In the second part of the book "what pulls us apart" he deals with issues like race and what his data shows about the prevalence of racism in American society, as well as the internet's capacity for rage. The last part of the book "what makes us who we are" continues with the relationships theme as he investigates a few more racial as well as gay and bi-sexual issues before covering a few miscellaneous topics like comparing the kind of uses of this data he makes and his vision of using it for good compared to things like marketing and government spying.

People who consider themselves Data Scientists may be bothered by the fact that he does not go into much formal detail and actually few of his analyses require any fancy math or a PhD in anything.
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24 of 30 people found the following review helpful By W. A. Carpenter VINE VOICE on August 5, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Christian Rudder, one of the founders of the dating service OkCupid and a Harvard trained mathematician, offers us insights from some really big social media data bases. Using analytic techniques to look at overall trends, rather than predictions about individuals, he demonstrates an ethical way to use all of the data that is collected on people who do Google searches, use dating sites, tweet on Twitter, and "friend" people on Facebook.

The results are not always dramatic or interesting, but it is amazing how much can be determined from the on-line behavior of millions of people. He offers, for example, a very credible estimate of the percentage of the population that is gay. He also has an interesting analysis of how people reacted when it became clear that Obama was going to be our first black president.

The only reason I did not give this book five stars is due to the author's tendency to throw in unnecessary profanity and sarcastic comments. I think he intended these to be humorous, in at least some cases, but I found them distracting interruptions in the flow of an otherwise fine book.

Rudder has a number of really wonderful graphs in the book, showing the trends in the data sets. These are inspired by the work of Edward Tufte - see The Visual Display of Quantitative Information for example - and he could not have chosen a better role model. One of the most interesting parts of the book, to this geeky reader, was his final Note on Data which should be the standard that all researchers in this type of analysis.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Rosco Snappy on September 15, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed his blog, OKTrends http://blog.okcupid.com/. The best parts of this book are just a rehash of the posts from OKTrends plus many, many pages of insufferable pontificating.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mike VINE VOICE on September 14, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In short, a mildly amusing, somewhat inaccurate popular science portrayal of BigData from the viewpoint of a former OKCupid head honcho - who is not all that good at statistics or experimental design.
----------
The Good:
The book is a lively and occasionally interesting work which you will find of interest if you use OK Cupid a lot or don't know anything about BigData. The graphs in the book are very pleasing to the eye.

The Bad:

This person thinks Wikipedia is a reputable source for, well, everything. Sources are misattributed. Some facts are just plain wrong - like embeddedness' origin (it's Polanyi). A lot of the statistics involve sweeping and bizarre assumptions (sentences have no impact on language) or incorrect extrapolations of information (Twitter is far superior to Shakespeare).

Profanity is used needlessly (this would otherwise be perfectly appropriate for young teens). Last, but certainly not least, sources are unreliable (Wikipedia is used repeatedly). The book is disorganized and desperately needs some chapters juggled around to be a more cohesive entity. I blame the editor as much as the author.

Overall, very readable, but thoroughly mediocre and terribly sourced.
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Mediocre. 2.5/5
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45 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Paul Cassel VINE VOICE on August 18, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The author implies that this book presents data which will change the way we see ourselves. Not true. Instead, what we have here are snippets of often interesting but, for the most part, unrelated bits of data sourced variously and without mention of method.

There are two issues with the data itself. It's not cohesive. That is, the author doesn't drive toward a point or perform research. Instead he samples this or that he apparently either finds interesting himself or he thinks the readers will enjoy absorbing. Some of the data is worth thinking about or discussing around the water cooler tomorrow at work. The other issue is the interpretation the author puts on the data or the lack of it or something or other.

A good deal of the data is taken from the dating site, OKCupid.com which the author started along with two others. Any person who's taken Statistics 101 can tell you that this sample has a few issues from self-section to it not representing humanity as a whole. For example, you can be well assured that no happily married folks had anything to do with these data sets. Aren't happily married people part of `humanity'?

The second issue starts with the author seeming to make a good deal out of nothing. In one chart with frequency of words used to describe oneself cross tabbed with race, he finds Hispanic males rarely describe themselves as having a southern accent, having blue eyes or being a redneck. I believe the author's data here, but did I need to see this chart to know these things?

In another chart, how men rate women's looks is cross tabbed by women's race. The chart shows that black women are, and are by far, rated as less good looking than Asian, Latina or white women. So what do we take from that?
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